1. Click image to expand

    Images by Champalimaud and YTL

  2. Click image to expand

    Images by Champalimaud and YTL

  3. Click image to expand

    Images by Champalimaud and YTL

  4. Click image to expand

    Images by Champalimaud and YTL

  5. Click image to expand

    Images by Champalimaud and YTL

  6. Click image to expand

    Images by Champalimaud and YTL

  7. Click image to expand

    Images by Champalimaud and YTL

  8. Click image to expand

    Images by Champalimaud and YTL

  9. Click image to expand

    Images by Champalimaud and YTL

  10. Click image to expand

    Images by Champalimaud and YTL

  11. Click image to expand

    Images by Champalimaud and YTL

of

Peacocks on Monkey Island

Katie Hnery
20 Nov 2019

Monkey Island Estate, located in the historic village of Bray-on-Thames Berkshire, has reopened after undergoing enormous renovation from award-winning New York-based studio Champalimaud Design.

Champalimaud Design used the renovation as a celebration and tribute to the island’s glorious history. Inspiration for the design was taken from the two original island structures of the Temple and Pavilion buildings, constructed in the late 1730s by Charlses Spencer, 3rd Duke of Marlborough. 

The new design includes melded garden elements including a stunning botanical wallcovering in the entry hall for the Pavillion, a lattice covered Marlborough Ballroom and the extension of the lounge and restaurant into the adjacent terrace and gardens. Champalimaud Design worked to use the developed features to celebrate the soulfulness found in the original Robert Morris Buildings. 

The design also celebrates the anecdotal history of the island and some of its human and animal inhabitants. The famous Andieu de Clermont paintings have been retained and restored in the Estate, featuring monkeys dressed in finery and doing human activities. The Monkey Lounge and Bar are made with upholstery fabrics that are inspired by the clothing worn by the monkeys, reflecting their crimson and blue knee-length coats. 

Another tribute to the island is made through the use of peacock blue in the restaurant wallpaper and painted ceiling to celebrate the flock of peacocks that live there. There are also peacock silhouettes placed in the wallpaper in The River Room. 

The lodging interiors were influenced by the boats moving along the river, paying close attention to the surroundings of the project and the rich history that it holds. They also created bespoke amenities and storage cabinets inspired by the cabins on board, as they would make people feel very at home whilst on the Thames. The colours used are a variety of warm greys, deep blues and caramels that perfectly reflect the colours of the gardens. 

The studio worked to create a modern, fresh and spa like feel for the guest bathrooms. They also did a full restoration of the historic Temple Building’s Wedgewood Suite, with the iconic ceiling remaining the signature Wedgewood blue and decorated with the contrasting white platerwork. Along with the renovated ceiling, paneled walls and wood flooring, a contemporary bathroom and dressing room was installed.