London’s skyline set to be filled with 510 more towers

Nick Myall
Monday 23 Apr 2018

Canary Wharf, Docklands and Greenwich Peninsula continue to be the focus for high rise development

London’s skyline is set to be transformed by 510 tall buildings over 20-storeys. Work has already started on 115 towers according to research from New London Architecture (NLA) and GL Hearn.

Canary Wharf and the Docklands area continue to be development hotspots as well as Greenwich Peninsula with 40 applications for tall buildings last year. More than 90% (458) of the tall buildings coming forward are residential and could deliver up to 106,000 new homes.

Delivering towers has become more challenging with only 18 tall buildings completed in 2017 – a 30% drop from 2016 when 26 were completed.

There was also a 25% fall in the number of tall buildings coming out of the ground with work only starting on 40 in 2017. Political and economic uncertainty brought about by the BREXIT vote may have caused this.

Peter Murray, Chairman of New London Architecture said: “We continue to see a steady increase in the number of tall buildings coming forward and with London’s population continuing to increase and the demand for new homes only getting higher, our view remains that that well designed tall buildings, in the right place, are part of the solution.

“Uncertainties and challenges to deliver these tall buildings remain, which is perhaps why we are seeing a slight slowdown in the in the number of applications, construction starts and completions. However our reports over the past five years show us in the right places, towers allow us to use the finite resource of land very efficiently.”

Stuart Baillie, GL Hearn said: “Inner London remains the focus for the majority of tall building but Waltham Forest and Bromley feature in the pipeline for the first time.”

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Nick Myall

News editor

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