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C.F. Møller completes student homes with a twist

Nick Myall
Tuesday 19 Apr 2016

A unique complex of sustainable student housing with twists and turns that create views of the Danish countryside

The Campus Hall Student Housing at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense by C.F. Møller Architects has completed, and is now fully occupied by a mix of Danish and international students.

The design is based on a strong community spirit, with the 250 student residences located in three interconnected 15-storey buildings. This means that the residence has no front or back, but appears attractive from a 360-degree perspective. The building's distinctive shape makes it easily recognizable on the campus. The dorm rooms are located on the outer faces of the three towers, where they all enjoy views of the countryside without overlooking neighbouring rooms, due to the building's turns and twists. Each room has a private balcony, which both helps make the homes attractive, but also has an environmental function: The shading internal balconies help manage solar gain, contributing to significant energy savings.

The shared areas are carefully graded from small and intimate communities to larger rooms for big occasions, to establish a balance between the common and the need for privacy. Moving inwards from the private rooms towards the communal kitchen in the centre, areas gradually become more and more collective: A shared living room acts as a social meeting place for the small cluster of seven rooms, which all residences are grouped in, and acts as a transition to the fully communal spaces. The kitchens at the centre of each floor are shared by all, and feature generous glazed facades that ensure light and views in three directions. The top floors have spectacular views, and are reserved for common activities such as study groups, party rooms and green roof terraces.

The Campus Hall is a low-energy construction made from quality materials that meets the strict Danish codes for low-energy class 2020 and gives priority to public transport and cycling - a bike for each resident is provided. The building's overall energy concept is based on the optimization of passive design parameters such as shape, orientation, adaptation to climatic conditions, daylighting, ceiling heights and structural thermal mass, as well as a highly insulated and airtight building envelope, use of natural cross-ventilation, and extensive heat recovery from exhaust air, waste water and showers.

The WAN Sustainable Buildings Award 2016 closes on April 30. For more information contact:

christina.ingram@builtenvironmentmedia.com

+44 (0) 1273 201 123

Nick Myall

News Editor

Key Facts:

Education Residential
Architecture
Denmark

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