• Photo Credit Ruy Teixeira thanks to Native Land Click image to expand

    Photo Credit Ruy Teixeira thanks to Native Land

  • Photo Credit Ruy Teixeira thanks to Native Land Click image to expand

    Photo Credit Ruy Teixeira thanks to Native Land

  • Photo Credit Ruy Teixeira thanks to Native Land Click image to expand

    Photo Credit Ruy Teixeira thanks to Native Land

  • Photo Credit Ruy Teixeira thanks to Native Land Click image to expand

    Photo Credit Ruy Teixeira thanks to Native Land

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    London-based studio Waldo works have recently completed the penthouse in the Richard Rogers NEO bankside building, next to the Tate Modern. The building itself is spectacular, and in the penthouse most walls are glass, offering fantastic views over the cultural quarter of Southbank and across the Thames to St Paul's and beyond. 

    Waldo Works first looked to the strong geometric architecture of NEO Bankside and unprecedented views of the city skyline, which lead them to take reference from sacred geometry. With the undulating River Thames below, the historic lifeline for London, and the vast sky surround, the penthouse is undeniably connected to the elements and something bigger than itself.

    Referencing this and to create a sense of place, the studio turned to the beauty and complex delicacy of the constellations and vast expanse of the sky. The studio used this as the basis for the design concept, to establish the principals of significance, proportion and meaning.

    Impressive in location and architecture, on entering the penthouse, the visitor walks into the double height living area with a sloping wall in front; a full height library stocked with carefully curated objects. Above is a gallery walkway, hung with artworks and a desk overlooking the floor below, leading onto the guest bedrooms and en-suite bathrooms.

    The lower floor is broadly in two zones: the living areas and kitchen and dining areas, designed to play on the idea of the passing from day to night, from light to dark. The kitchen and dining area picks up on the watery colours of the London light, and the living areas hints toward a moodier darker sky, the walls painted in tones of grey.


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