• Joe Price Studio Number 1 (project, perspective with bridge), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, 1953-54: Bruce Alonzo Goff, American, 1904-1982. Reproduction ©The Art Institute of Chicago. Click image to expand

    Joe Price Studio Number 1 (project, perspective with bridge), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, 1953-54: Bruce Alonzo Goff, American, 1904-1982. Reproduction ©The Art Institute of Chicago.

  • John Garvey House Number 1 (project, interior perspective), Urbana, Illinois, 1952: Bruce Alonzo Goff, American, 1904-1982. Photograph by Robert Lifson. Reproduction ©The Art Institute of Chicago. Click image to expand

    John Garvey House Number 1 (project, interior perspective), Urbana, Illinois, 1952: Bruce Alonzo Goff, American, 1904-1982. Photograph by Robert Lifson. Reproduction ©The Art Institute of Chicago.

  • Nancy and Eugene Bavinger House (North elevation), Norman, Oklahoma, 1950-1951: Bruce Alonzo Goff, American, 1904-1982. Photograph by Robert Lifson. Reproduction ©The Art Institute of Chicago. Click image to expand

    Nancy and Eugene Bavinger House (North elevation), Norman, Oklahoma, 1950-1951: Bruce Alonzo Goff, American, 1904-1982. Photograph by Robert Lifson. Reproduction ©The Art Institute of Chicago.

  • Perfect Prisms: Crystal Chapel, 2009: Ellen Sandor, Chris Kemp, Chris Day, Ben Carney, and Miguel Delgado, (art)n. This work was inspired by Bruce Goff’s breathtaking designs for a nondenominational chapel at the University of Oklahoma. The chapel has been constructed with an array of various prisms advancing out into space. Refraction of light and reflection color break up the serene environment and awaken it with new energy. Click image to expand

    Perfect Prisms: Crystal Chapel, 2009: Ellen Sandor, Chris Kemp, Chris Day, Ben Carney, and Miguel Delgado, (art)n. This work was inspired by Bruce Goff’s breathtaking designs for a nondenominational chapel at the University of Oklahoma. The chapel has been constructed with an array of various prisms advancing out into space. Refraction of light and reflection color break up the serene environment and awaken it with new energy.

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Bruce Goff: A Creative Mind

Sian
Tuesday 28 Sep 2010

Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art hosts enlightening exhibition on the late Bruce Goff

Natural talent is a term thrown around with alarming regularity these days, with almost every other architect or designer noted as having an intrinsic ability to turn out innovative design after design at the lethargic flick of a pen. Late American architect Bruce Goff on the other hand earned this title through sheer imaginative curiosity. Goff began his design career from a very early age - taking on an apprenticeship with a Tulsa architecture firm (Rush, Endacott and Rush) at the tender age of twelve and completing his first full design at fifteen.  

With no formal education past high school to fall back on Goff threw himself into the design world, eventually accumulating a portfolio of around 500 projects - a quarter of which were carried through to full realisation. Not content with the singular role of an active architect, in 1946 Goff also took a teaching position at the University of Oklahoma School of Architecture, soon stepping up to the plate as the institution's chairman despite his lack of extended formal education.

Over time, Goff became renowned in his field for his fearless experiments in material and construction. Designs such as the soaring art deco Tulsa Boston Avenue Methodist-Episcopal Church and the Pavilion for Japanese Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (a slight side-step from his usual project locations of Oklahoma and Illinois) managed to cement Goff's position as an architect to be reckoned with.

Though respected the world over for his contributions to the architecture community, nowhere is the adoration of Bruce Goff as profound as in Oklahoma, U.S. In celebration of his life, the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art at the University of Oklahoma is hosting an exhibition entitled Bruce Goff: A Creative Mind which will feature an array of original drawings, paintings and 3D models of the architect's work. Alongside this, Skyline Ink Animation has recreated twelve structures through state-of-the-art digital tours so that visitors can experience Goff's work on a first hand basis.

The exhibition opens to the public on 9th October 2010 with a free launch event featuring lectures and a panel discussion. For more information about the exhibition, click here.

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