Elements
Friday 28 Oct 2016

Recently launched at Decorex, the Elements collection of hand knotted rugs has been over two years in the designing and making. Hand made in Nepal, each rug is translated into wool and silk from Tania’s own photographs of light, shadows and reflections. 
The six new designs in the collection; Dots, Forest, Rays, Stream, Sunlight and Tide all portray these elements of light and shadow in impressionistic detail. 
Dots: A textural interpretation of Tania’s photograph of patterns formed by shadows on an uneven surface. Raised circles of pure silk dot a wool background creating a beautifully tactile effect.
Forest: An intricate portrayal of trees blurred by rain.
Rays: Light falling on a gravelly surface is depicted through pure silk on a wool background.
Stream: Reflections on the water’s surface are translated through tonal shades of colour
Sunlight: Dappled sunlight is conveyed using an extensive colour palette mixing tints of different hues
Tide: the soft ebb and flow of the sea are conveyed through subtle shades of silk and wool.
Each of these abstracted patterns can easily be considered for a range of applications from residential to hospitality and commercial projects. 
Tania Johnson Design works with leading interior designers and international showrooms. All her work is bespoke and can be commissioned to specific colours and scale. Every rug is hand knotted and Tania has worked closely with the same manufacturer since starting her business. With each of her regular visits to Kathmandu, her connection with the people and country deepens and she is constantly amazed by the incredible skill involved at every stage of the hand weaving process, from dyeing each shade to weaving every knot.
Every rug in the collection is certified by GoodWeave, ensuring no child labour is used during the production and aiming to improve working conditions for adults. 
Designed with integrity from beginning to end, each Tania Johnson rug conveys a unique connection between inspiration, tradition and skill.
Photography: Gavin Kingcome