Nomad
The Garden Apartment Thursday 13 Nov 2014

Nomad is a portable herb planter made from folded fabric. The design is adaptable to a variety of environments with limited space for plants. It can hang from a rope, sit on the coffee table, be transported to the window for more sunlight or the user may choose to only plant one side and hang it on the wall to create a vertical garden. The open ended design leaves the placement up to the user.

The planter is created from a fabric rectangle, folded into a double sided pot and stamped with an eyelet. There is a gap between the two layers which allows the soil to breathe and drain. The design is reduced to its essential structural elements, creating an efficient manufacturing process that all takes place in New York City. Nomad is then shipped flat-packed in a 12" x 15" envelope.

Nomad is made from scrap boat sails and boat covers. The materials are locally sourced from the post production waste of sail makers in the Bronx. Some of the materials are also sailcloth from the 80s that isn't up to par with the sail industry today.

Herbs require minimal maintenance, so their needs are adaptable to city apartments and their limitations. By growing herbs the user can harvest them as needed and it makes for more interesting, inexpensive meals, since in a grocery store setting herbs can be as expensive as vegetables.

Herbs serve many more uses other than culinary, also having healing properties and aromatic benefits. Thus access to fresh herbs is an inspiration to cook and to celebrate the culture of food. Nomad is a stepping stone to a more self-sufficient lifestyle that The Garden Apartment envisions.

designer biog

The Garden Apartment

The Garden Apartment is a collaboration between two product designers with a common passion for food and design. Swiss born Miriam Josi and Australian born Stella Lee Prowse met during their time at Parsons The New School For Design in New York City. The Garden Apartment is their attempt to reconnect with the culture of growing and cooking at home in an urban environment where busy lifestyles and easy access to take-out creates a disconnect between a meal and where it comes from