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TUESDAY 16 JANUARY 2018

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NEWS IN PICTURES

UK construction giant Carillion goes into liquidation

Lead News

Birmingham Post 

The UK's second biggest construction company has collapsed

Talks between UK-based construction firm Carillion, its lenders and the UK government, aimed at saving the firm from collapse, have failed to reach a deal. Carillion has run up huge debts on large contracts which means the UK government will have to step in to provide funding if critical public services run by Carillion are to continue. The company has 43,000 staff worldwide - 20,000 in the UK. It is not clear yet how those staff will be affected. The firm has debts of £1.5bn and a £587m pensions shortfall.  It is heavily involved with public sector projects in the UK as part of the UK government’s often criticised policy of privatising public sector services. Hundreds of smaller firms that are in the supply chain on Carillion led projects will also be affected. A large number of architects will be affected by Carillion's liquidation. Bennetts Asso

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The escalator rises to the occasion

The escalator rises to the occasion

thyssenkrupp celebrates the escalator’s 125th birthday

Imagine a world where dreams of being transported upwards via a moving staircase was simply that, a dream. Urban mobility would look significantly different today, and be far more complicated, had it not been for a man who, while attempting to create New York City’s first double-decker subway, created something even more important. Over one hundred and twenty-five years ago, Jesse Reno invented the first working escalator, which was patented on March 15, 1892. The first escalator, then known as an incline elevator, was installed at the Old Iron Pier at Coney Island in New York City on January 16, 1893. The moving stairway elevated passengers on a conveyor belt at a 25-degree angle and traveled only seven feet. The escalator ran for two weeks at Old Iron Pier before moving to the Brooklyn Bridge. It is estimated that it carried 75,000 passengers during its two weeks at the Old Iron Pier. Today, more than 100 billion people in the United States alone use escalators every year. Perfected by thyssenkrupp Elevator The technology that Jesse Reno first developed 125 years ago has been perfected over the years and decades by thyssenkrupp. Today, the company’s solutions are installed all around the globe in huge numbers. If all escalators installed by thyssenkrupp were joined together, they would be long enough to scale a mountain with a height of 500 kilometers. A huge variety are available – from an escalator that’s only 890 centimeters long up to one that measures 53.68 meters. There are “Royal Mode“ escalators designed for kings and queens to easily start and stop by simply pressing a button, and even mobile solutions that are a “to go” option and can be carried around the world in air planes. In Prague and some Russian cities people travel with high speed -- with some escalators moving their passengers at 0.9 meters/sec. In Germany, escalators have only been manufactured in serial production since 1950. Before then they were built by hand on the construction site. Securing jobs worldwide thyssenkrupp Elevator solutions not only move people and goods, but also secure jobs: Today, around 155,000 people are in the elevator and escalator industry worldwide. In Germany alone there are around 18,000. In Hamburg, thyssenkrupp runs Germany’s only factory for escalators. The company also maintains about 25,000 escalators in Europe. A mechanic cares for up to 40 escalators – per month! Today, in Europe there are more than 136,000 escalators installed, 35,600 of them in Germany. An average escalator’s lifespan is up to 30 years before it has to be modernized, but there’s still growth ahead - with some additional 5,500 new escalators every year. The escalator’s 125th birthday is a great occasion for thyssenkrupp to celebrate: to look back at history and into the future with its potential technical developments that continue to make urban mobility smarter. With the rope-less MULTI elevator, thyssenkrupp already provides a look into what the future may hold.

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Pointing to the heavens

Pointing to the heavens

This chapel is dedicated to Our Lady of Fatima and is inspired by the outdoor life that is central to the Scout movement

From the architects... The construction of this building came from the desire to have a chapel at the National Scout ?s Activities Camp (CNAE), in the municipality of Idanhaa Nova, central region of Portugal, for the XXIII National Jamboree of Portuguese Catholic Scouts, which involved about 22,000 participants, and to join the other definitive buildings that this scouting centre has. The chosen location is a plateau area, central in the CNAE, surrounded by a rural environment, with an extraordinary panoramic view .The spacial experience begins with the access route to the chapel, a gradual passage to a more introspective environment. This space is delimited by a wood fence, composed of spaced poles, sufficient to delimit the space, but purposely open, showing a chapel available to all who pass by. Crowning the entrance there is a bell, acclaimer of Christian life, and allusive to the catholic Scout association of Portugal and to the XXIII National Camping. The chapel is dedicated to Our Lady of Fatima and is inspired by the scouting experience: outdoor life, camping, the tent, and by the sobriety and simplicity of buildings and lifestyle. The pointed edges of the building allude to the scout’s scarf, the symbol of vow and commitment of this movement. The chapel was thought out as a large tent,with open doors to everyone, at all times:a constant welcoming point for shelter, contemplation and introspection. It ?s very simple form, asa classical tent, is formed by a gable roof,adapted to receive all visitors. The structure approaches people in the entrance area, where the volume is lower and narrower, closer to the human scale, and stretches forward and upward, elevating the user to something higher, facing a dazzling landscape in background, that amplifies these sensations.  The east / west orientation of the chapel enables the sunrise to illuminate its interior space, and the sunset to fill the place with an immensity of colours, tones and ambiences, that arouse the eye and sustain the architectural arrangement. In fall and winter, the light emphasizes the tranquility of the place, and the unadorned symbiosis between building and landscape.The entrance point, where the building resembles the scouts scarf, and the way it rests on the neck, is also marked by the presence of water, that is “born” here. Here emerges a watercourse, that invites to visit the chapel and the Mystery that it celebrates. This course evokes the long and rich biblical and liturgical symbology.The water crosses the whole space of the chapel, on a path that develops into the altar -the central place of any Christian celebratory space -and then into the landscape, directing the user to the cross, which is outside the chapel, in the same alignment. The cross points out the landscape and consolidates the feeling of amplitude and projection to the Divine. The large cross, implanted at the landscape, with its imposing and yet delicate form, tapers as it gains height, and testifies the solemnity of the place. The alignment of these liturgical elements is arranged along a path that is covered by the architectural form, which while protecting, also projects the user upwards and towards the landscape, unifying the purposes of the formal and conceptual design of the building. The wood and zinc structure give a simple and protective external aspect to the temple, and creates a cozy interior ambience. Inside, the covering is supported by 12 wooden beams (an allusion to the Apostles)revealing the constructive simplicity and truth.With a total length of 12m, the structure reaches its highest point at 9m, after the Altar, where the raising of the main beam increases the space depth, and highlights this sacral point. The chosen materials integrate the building in the surroundings, the scout practice, and in the architectural concept. Wood is a material widely used by scouts in their constructions. It is a natural and traditional material, which provides solidity and comfort. Zinc, also a traditional material, here chosen not only for its excellent qualities of tightness, but also for the feeling of protection it confers. The altar, the fountain and the path of water are permanent elements of the building,and are made of stone,a natural and noble material. The chair, the ambo, the support of the ceremonial candle, the base of the figure of Our Lady of Fátima and the benches of the assembly are movable. These elements are made of solid wood, worked in a simple, almost crude form, cleared of additional elements, letting function overlap decoration. Light, an important theme in architecture and religious expression, was designed to highlight the expressiveness of all interior and exterior space. Due to its location, in a rural environment, the chosen artificial lighting is discreet and harmoniously distributed. At night the illumination highlight ?sand frames the building with the surrounding nature and stars above. The light comes from underneath,and projects itself in the edified set, and in the great cross, enriching the dimensions of the architecture, and giving it ethereal dimensions. A single point of light stands out from the rest of the illumination, and falls from the top of the structure's shaft, over the altar, consecrating the reverence of this element. The chapel serves the scout community and hosts celebrations for a greater number of people. In these cases the assembly can be in the large exterior space, leaving the celebrant facing the landscape, which transforms the whole chapel into an altar. This is a spiritual place, a simple, sacred existence. It invites reflection and an encounter with faith, while looking forward, to a higher horizon.

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Milan University goes green

Milan University goes green

The new complex of the international faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Physiotherapy at the Humanitas Research Hospital is designed by architect Filippo Taidelli

The official opening of the new Humanitas University Campus -International faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Physiotherapy at the Humanitas Research Hospital – has taken place in Milan. The complex of buildings and greenery designed by the Italian Architect Filippo Taidelli of the FTA Studio is an articulated university campus consisting of three new buildings covering 25.000 sq m. The complex has been designed to accommodate 1,200 students from 31 different countries, teachers, researchers, a 2,000 sq m Simulation Lab - one of the most technologically advanced and largest in Europe, high-tech classrooms, a digital library and a student residence. The total investment was about 100 million euros. The architecture, simple and essential, promotes functionality and the fading of borders between the didactic center, the research pole and the multifunctional hub: placed in a sort of "Triangle of knowledge" starting from the clinical aspect and ending through didactics with the lab which is the foundation of the Humanitas mission. The project consists in three volumes: a multifunctional building with canteen, library and common functions; a didactic center with classrooms, offices and the Simulation Center; the research labs, organized around a square opening on a green internal courtyard. Large windows make the space fluid, characterized by double and triple heights and wide terraces, which can be also used as outdoor classrooms. SUSTAINABILITY The spaces have been conceived according to the most modern standards in technology and in comfort. The application of these climatic strategies co-operating with active systems such as groundwater heat pumps, low temperature radiant panels heating and installation of photovoltaic panels in the roof, have obtained the top energy class CENED A3. The green campus is not limited to landscaping but is the demonstration of a special attention to environmental issues that makes possible a significant reduction in energy consumption and an increase in users comfort. Nick Myall News editor

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IN BRIEF

Woods Bagot Announces New China Head

Stephen Jones has been appointed Regional Executive Chair, China, for

University of Bristol appoints Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, Hawkins\Brown, and BuroHappold for new University Library

A new £80 million library development is to be built at the hear

AIA|LA announce winners of 2017 student awards competition

The American Institute of Architects Los Angeles chapter (AIA|LA) is d

EVENTS

22.02.2018 

Annual Architecture & Design Film Festival 
Annual Architecture & Design Film Festival Washington D.C. from February 2 

05.04.2018 

Dwell on Design 
The Largest Design Fair on the West Coast of the USA at the Los Angeles Con 

Stanton Williams extends Cambridge Judge Business School

Stanton Williams extends Cambridge Judge Business School

A major centre for business education has been created in Cambridge as existing much-loved University buildings have been extended

Stirling Prize-winning architect Stanton Williams has completed a £21.5 million expansion for Cambridge Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge in the UK, demonstrating the practice’s expertise in unlocking the potential of complex sites, and creating a versatile hub for postgraduate and executive business education. The Simon Sainsbury Centre is built adjoining the Business School’s Grade II listed, John Outram-redesigned Addenbrooke’s building. This wonderful new space brings together all parts of the Cambridge Judge Business School community: pre-experience and post-experience students; EMBA participants; Executive Education clients; faculty; staff and external partners, enabling the Cambridge Judge Business School community to continue solving real-world problems with greater diversity and creativity. The new four storey 5,000 sq m building replaces two former nurses’ hostels on Tennis Court Road along the eastern boundary of the site. It has been designed to complement rather than compete with the Outram building, which was completed in 1995 as a remodelling of the 18th and 19th Century hospital buildings. As well as providing flexible education spaces for the School’s Executive Education programme, the Centre contains additional teaching, conferencing, office breakout and dining spaces for the school, reflecting the evolving culture of the University and the changing requirements of learning environments. Through the physical juxtaposition of old, new and the more recent past, the project demonstrates a complex layering of history which embodies the identity of the School whilst expressing its contemporary needs. Stanton Williams’s design is conceived as an extension to the original hospital, drawing inspiration from the historic masonry façade designed by Matthew Digby Wyatt. This rhythm of brick buttresses and fine stone columns sets the structural and material tone of the new building. The height of the hospital wards within the existing building establishes principal floor levels and room heights across the site, while the massing reinstates the scale of the original hospital campus, helping to anchor the school in its urban setting. Use of strong colour and refined materials, juxtaposed with exposed structural concrete, references the bold colour, rich materials and exposed structure of both the 19th Century building and the 1990s Outram transformation. The resulting campus creates a unified identity that transcends individual period styles. Internal spaces have been designed to promote interaction between students, delegates and staff through the provision of generous foyer and circulation spaces. This engaging environment provides a sequence of spaces of different scales and characters, all with a strong sense of materiality and access to views. The Centre is on track to achieve a BREEAM Excellent rating for sustainability. It utilises an innovative strategy of distributed ventilation with the incorporation of 60 small heat recovery units within the building envelope to create a ‘breathing façade’. This use of the Trox system is the first of its type in the UK. “The new building will bring together all parts of our community under one roof while maintaining our position at the heart of the Cambridge Cluster. In doing so, it will enable us to continue solving real-world problems in even more diverse and creative ways,” says Christoph Loch, Dean of Cambridge Judge Business School. “The Simon Sainsbury Centre embodies the identity of the School whilst fulfilling its contemporary needs, adding a further layer to the progressive transformation of this historic site,” says Gavin Henderson, Director at Stanton Williams. Nick Myall News editor

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A vertical forest set to rise in Eindhoven

A vertical forest set to rise in Eindhoven

The Trudo Vertical Forest of Eindhoven is a new social housing urban forestry project by Stefano Boeri Architetti

Based in Milan, Italy, Studio Stefano Boeri Architetti are well known for creating high rise projects that incorporate large amounts of vegetation into their design. The company continues to create sustainable architecture worldwide. Following the Vertical Forest projects in Milan, Nanjing, Utrecht, Tirana, Lausanne, Paris – and after the global publication of the call-to-action video for Urban Forestry comes the firm’s latest announcement  that a new Vertical Forest will be constructed in the Netherlands, in Eindhoven. The Trudo Vertical Forest will be the first Vertical Forest adopted by a social housing project. It is therefore destined for use by low-income social groups, particularly young people with an urban lifestyle. The 19 floors of the Tower will house apartments rented out at affordable rates and graced by balconies with hundreds of trees and plants in a wide variety of species. “The high-rise building of Eindhoven confirms that it is possible to combine the great challenges of climate change with those of housing shortages. Urban forestry is not only necessary to improve the environment of the world’s cities but also an opportunity to improve the living conditions of less fortunate city dwellers”, declares Stefano Boeri. The Client, Sint-Trudo, has been immensely keen on the construction of this building, which will have 125 social housing units. “The Trudo Vertical Forest sets new living standards. Each apartment will have a surface area of under 50 sq m and the exclusive benefit of 1 tree, 20 shrubs and over 4 sq m of terrace. Thanks to the use of prefabrication, the rationalization of technical solutions for the facade, and the consequent optimization of resources, this will be the first Vertical Forest prototype destined for social housing” states Francesca Cesa Bianchi, Project Director of Stefano Boeri Architetti. The Trudo Vertical Forest Tower will be a 75m skyscraper whose facade will provide a home to 125 trees, 5,200 shrubs and plants. It will create a green habitat in the metropolitan environment to facilitate the development of biodiversity, an authentic eco-system with over 70 different plant species able to counteract atmospheric pollution, thanks to the capacity of trees to absorb over 50 tons of carbon dioxide every year. The particular characteristic of the buildings in the Vertical Forest family is that of conceiving vegetation and living nature as actual cornerstones of the architectural projects, rather than p. 1 mere ornamental elements. For the design of the plant component of the Trudo Vertical Forest, Studio Laura Gatti, managed by agronomist Laura Gatti (who has contributed to the Vertical Forest in Milan and other urban forestry projects by Stefano Boeri Architetti) will work closely with Du Pré Groenprojecten in Helmond and the plant nursery Van den Berk in Sint-Oedenrode. Sint Trudo will handle the maintenance work. Following Milan, Lausanne, Nanjing, Paris, Tirana, Shanghai, Utrecht and Liuzhou Forest City, it is now the turn of Eindhoven, the latest piece to be added to a great urban forestry design by Stefano Boeri Architetti. https://www.stefanoboeriarchitetti.net/trudoverticalforest Nick Myall News editor  

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Perkins+Will move ahead in Suzhou

Perkins+Will move ahead in Suzhou

Perkins+Will to design Suzhou Science & Technology Museum highlighting Suzhou’s commercial history and future of innovation

Global architecture firm Perkins+Will will design the Suzhou Science & Technology Museum, the centerpiece of a new cultural district in Shishan Park, about 62 miles northwest of Shanghai. With its terraced landscapes and flowing design, the new 600,000 sq ft museum is inspired by the Chinese expression of shan sui, which roughly translated means the union of mountain and lake. Located at the foot of Lion Mountain and next to Shishan Lake, the museum also will include a 66,700 sq ft industrial exhibition hall, where exhibits will highlight the role of industrial development in enriching lives. The Science & Technology Museum is Perkins+Will’s most recent civic and cultural project in China following the Shanghai Natural History Museum, which earned international accolades after its opening in 2015. “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to design the new Suzhou Science & Technology Museum,” said Ralph Johnson, Global Design Director of Perkins+Will. “Our design recognizes the importance of Suzhou in China’s commercial history, and underscores its role at the forefront of China’s emergence as a technology leader and innovator.  The museum also draws inspiration from the natural environment surrounding it.” The museum concept melds the city’s heritage as a major trading center on the Yangtze River – sometimes known as “the Venice of the East” – with a contemporary look that reflects the city’s current wave of innovation. Its ribbon-like form emerges from the base of Lion Mountain, twisting upward and turning back on itself to cantilever out over the edge of Shishan Lake and an archipelago of small islands to re-engage the mountain. This form creates an iconic infinity loop–an enduring symbol of prosperity–with the metallic facades evoking a flowing silk scarf, one of Suzhou’s most coveted exports. The lake itself will include several man-made, teardrop-shaped, planted Eco Islands, connected by walkway to the museum and serving as both a filtration system for the lake as an opportunity for environmental exploration and education.  Among other key design features: Visitors can arrive at the museum from several approaches. Those coming by subway will be guided into the museum along a shallow ramp to the circular promenade that surrounds the park. Visitors arriving by car or bus will enter through the “Discovery Court,” a formal plaza with reflecting pools and gathering spaces, offering a glimpse of what lies inside.  Just inside the entry sits a signature feature of the museum – a three-story atrium adjacent to a sunken water-filled courtyard that includes several small planted islands, recalling the Eco Islands in Shishan Lake. With the lower levels providing numerous access points, guests can enjoy all or a select number of exhibitions, with all levels within the museum having access to natural daylight. At the museum’s apex on the third level is “Lion Mountain Terrace” which stretches out over the Eco Islands in Shishan Lake, framing Lion Mountain in the distance. Sensitivity to the surrounding environment is a hallmark of sustainability in the new museum: The “Life-Giving Forest” outside provides an air filtration buffer to the city, plus a respite from the sun, space for movement and gathering, and opportunities to explore educational exhibits.  At the base, where the museum meets the lake, public pedestrian walkways winding through the wetlands and Eco Islands become outdoor learning environments with signage guiding children and adults to explore water purification, stormwater management, and sustainable living. The museum’s three-dimensional metal mesh skin that transitions from opaque to transparent will control daylight and solar gain to protect sensitive exhibits. The skin also allows interior light to filter through the façade at night, creating a soft shimmering glow that dynamically changes as visitors circulate around the building. Civic plazas are designed with permeable paving systems, and bioswales allow rain water to percolate directly into the ground or be directed toward the planted vegetation to be filtered naturally. Green roofs mitigate heat island effect and capture stormwater to create habitats rich with flora and fauna. Water restoration strategies – construction of wetlands, the design of a small archipelago of water filtering gardens – will improve the water quality of Shishan Lake, making it a healthy habitat for wildlife as well as a safe place for visitors. The Suzhou Museum aims to draw visitors from all over China and beyond, celebrating history and inspiring scientific learning and exploration for a new generation. In an unending loop – from the promenade embracing the park, the park embracing the mountain, and the mountain embracing the new building – the Science & Technology Museum will create an experience of infinite harmony between nature, technology, and urban life to shape, influence, and enrich people’s lives.  Nick Myall News editor

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Clear progress at Bristol’s Glass Wharf

Clear progress at Bristol’s Glass Wharf

Darling Associates have gained planning consent for a major new 210,000 sq ft office development in Bristol

Planning consent secured for 4 Glass Wharf: New office scheme will mark Darling Associates’ second project with Salmon Harvester on site 10 January 2018 Planning consent has been secured from Bristol City Council for 4 Glass Wharf, a major new 210,000 net sq ft headquarters office development in Bristol’s Temple Quarter Enterprise Zone. The project has been designed by award-winning architecture studio Darling Associates for developer Salmon Harvester Properties Ltd (Salmon).  The eight storey building will be situated on a brownfield development site neighbouring Salmon Harvester’s currently-under-construction 3 Glass Wharf, which has also been designed by Darling Associates and is pre-let to HMRC. That scheme is currently under construction and is scheduled for completion in Q4 2018.  Chris Darling, Managing Director, Darling Associates, comments, “The architecture of 4 Glass Wharf will directly respond to the design of its neighbour, ensuring a strong architectural integrity and coherence on this important development site. The design will celebrate Bristol’s industrial heritage, and especially glass production, with the concept for 4 Glass Wharf carefully developed in close consultation with Bristol City Council. “It is an exciting time to be involved with the development of Bristol’s burgeoning office market, and Glass Wharf is setting the really standard for contemporary office design in the city.”  Rorie Henderson, Salmon Development Director, comments. “The development of 4 Glass Wharf will bring our development programme on offices in Bristol to over 400,000 sq ft in the last five years. This latest phase will be Bristol’s biggest new office development in the last decade and at a time when there is virtually no new Grade A office supply in the city centre. We already have strong interest from potential occupiers and have been shortlisted by an occupier and are very excited by the prospect of delivering this building. 4 Glass Wharf will also include basement car parking and cycle storage plus landscaping and associated public realm improvements. The prominent development site is highly visible when entering Bristol by rail, and is located close to both Bristol Temple Meads station and Brunel floating harbour. The site is well served by public transport. Construction of 4 Glass Wharf, which will be the third and final phase of Salmon’s development programme in Bristol’s Temple Quarter Enterprise Zone, is intended to begin during the first quarter of 2018. GVA Second London Wall is project manager, with Mason Navarro Pledge the structural engineer and Carter Jonas the planning consultant. The development is targeting a BREEAM Excellent rating.  Nick Myall News editor

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The butterfly effect

The butterfly effect

This studio in Westport, USA combines timber, steel and thermally-insulated glass to create a unique structure

Designed by Valerie Schweitzer Architects and inspired in part by the closing of a butterfly’s wings and other organic forms, this 350 square-foot art studio and private office for a family home in Westport, Connecticut, provides a serene refuge. Like shards protruding from the earth, the studio’s angled panels clad in stucco and recycled teak, impart a primitive and futuristic quality at the same time. The structure exploits the potential of glass, wood and steel. The expansive skylight of steel and thermally-insulated glass eliminates the need for day-lighting, even for an artist. It also creates an airiness despite the confined floor plate. Efficiency is furthered by the sealed poured concrete floor that contains radiant heat piping; one may roll a work desk on wheels throughout the space. Due to the skylight and narrow windows, there is a strong sense of privacy and being hidden from the rest of the world. The view of changing skies and light create an optimal space for intermittent reflection during artistic production.  Cross-ventilation is achieved by carefully placed windows that capture breezes off the proximate Long Island Sound. A half-bath is included. [Source V2com] Nick Myall News editor

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Taking to the slopes

Taking to the slopes

The final design has been revealed for the Amager Bakke Waste-to-Energy Plant Rooftop Park in Copenhagen

Amager Resource Center and SLA have released the final design drawings of the coming Amager Bakke Waste-to-Energy Plant Rooftop Park – the 16,000 sq m combined ski slope and rooftop activity landscape that will adorn Copenhagen’s newest and most sustainable waste-to-energy plant as a public and nature-filled green rooftop park.  Initially masterplanned by BIG - Bjarke Ingels Group, the rooftop activity park is designed by Danish city nature experts and landscape architects SLA. When completed in September 2018, the green rooftop park will provide a host of outdoor activities for Copenhageners and visitors alike: Hiking trails, playgrounds, street fitness, trail running, vantage points, climbing walls and shelters – as well as 500+ meters ski slopes designed by BIG.  Creating a nature-filled activity park on top of the 88m tall waste-to-energy plant is a project without previous references: The extremely steep slope of the roof has put great demands on the planting design and the construction of the landscape, and the complicated wind and weather conditions 88 meters up in the air create difficult living conditions for trees and plants. The heat from the large energy boilers under the roof had to be handled (some places creating ground temperatures around 60 degrees Celsius), and a variety of security and safety demands addressed. ?The project to create an attractive and green activity rooftop park on top of Amager Bakke has been very challenging. Not only because of the extreme natural – and unnatural – conditions of the site and the rooftop itself, which put severe stress on plants, trees and landscape. But also because we?ve had to ensure that the rooftop?s many activities are realized in an accessible, intuitive and inviting manner. The goal is to ensure that Amager Bakke will become an eventful recreational public space with a strong aesthetic and sensuous city nature that gives value for all Copenhageners - all year round?, says SLA partner Rasmus Astrup. To solve these challenges, SLA has worked with a wide range of nature-based design solutions, testing types of vegetation and materials in 1:1 experiments. Different nature biotopes have been specially selected to accommodate the challenging living conditions of the roof and to provide optimal microclimate and wind shelter for the visitors. The result is a highly wild, lush and resilient green nature design which allows for year-round use of the rooftop while providing a sensuous and diverse environment as a basis for all the rooftop’s activities.  But SLA’s project will not only provide green attractions on the rooftop. The nature design has been devised so it will naturally spread to the surrounding city. ?The rooftop?s nature is designed to attract and shelter a wide selection of birds, bees, butterflies and insects, which in itself will mean a dramatic increase in the biodiversity of the area. And utilizing natural pollination and seed dispersal will mean that we can spread the rooftop nature to also benefit the adjacent industry area, parking lots and infrastructure. In this way, Amager Bakke will function as a generous ?green bomb? that will radically green-up the entire area?, says Rasmus Astrup.  The Amager Bakke Rooftop Park will break ground before Christmas and will be completed September 2018. Nick Myall News editor

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