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MONDAY 19 FEBRUARY 2018

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BIG and CRA combine in Singapore

Lead News

CRA-Carlo Ratti Associati, BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group 

Anchoring the rejuvenation of Raffles Place, this upcoming integrated development will set a new benchmark for workspaces of the future

The 280m tall high-rise taking shape on 88 Market Street, jointly designed by CRA-Carlo Ratti Associati and BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group will become an oasis in the bustling Central Business District of Singapore. The tower, one of the tallest in Singapore, blends urban life with tropical nature, redefining and elevating workplace and living standards for its users while adding an elegant new landmark to the Singapore skyline.  Located in the heart of Singapore’s financial district, the new 93,000 sq m, tech-integrated and verdurous skyscraper which includes the ‘office of the future’, a serviced residence and retail components, transforms the site of a former car park complex built in the 1980s. CRA and BIG were selected to design the 51-story high-rise following an international architectural competition hosted by Asia’s leading real estate company CapitaLand.

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WAN Urban Challenge Awards

David Bernstein - 24 June 1937 - 21 January 2018

David Bernstein - 24 June 1937 - 21 January 2018

David Bernstein, a pioneer of high density social housing, has passed away aged 80

David Bernstein, who has died aged 80, was one of five assistants who worked for the architect Patrick Hodgkinson on the design of the Brunswick Centre, near St Pancras station, London. The project was the first large-scale scheme that proved that housing could be built at high densities without tall tower blocks. According to the Guardian, it was initially planned as luxury shops and flats; Bernstein’s task in 1966 was to adapt the flats as low-cost housing for the London borough of Camden, after the developer miscalculated the rental income. A fellow assistant was David Levitt and the two architects resolved to practise together. As an American who had arrived in London in 1964, he saw through fresh eyes the problems of neglected, overcrowded properties in the city. In the Notting Hill area the poor quality housing was the legacy of the local agent Peter Rachman and it had a major  impact on Notting Hill’s West Indian community. Bruce Kenrick had been similarly moved in 1963 to form the Notting Hill Housing Trust, whose chief executive, John Coward, encouraged Bernstein to contact another new charity, Shelter, launched at the moment when Ken Loach’s television play Cathy Come Home brought Britain’s housing crisis to public attention. Bernstein founded the Circle 33 Housing Association with Levitt and their wives in 1968, and used his architectural talents not to build eye-catching designs like the Brunswick Centre but to create good, cheap homes, mainly through conversion work following a grant from Shelter. For its first six years, the architectural practice Levitt Bernstein (also formed in 1968) concentrated on social housing for Circle 33. “We found there were too many clients between us and the people who were to live in the housing we were doing, and we wanted to get closer,” Bernstein explained in 1977. The Housing Subsidies Act of 1967 had made it slightly easier for housing associations to get government grants, and Bernstein and Levitt spent their time surveying and converting Victorian houses, and managing their rents. Bernstein’s beliefs owed something to Jane Jacobs, whose The Death and Life of Great American Cities in 1961 challenged the rebuilding of great cities with modern blocks (exemplified by the Brunswick Centre), and more to his experience of inner London, blighted by a planned motorway “box” or redeveloped with blocks that ignored their residents’ needs. The reaction to modernist orthodoxy reflected the radical zeitgeist of 1968. Circle became one of Britain’s largest housing associations, since 2016 part of the Clarion Housing Group. The Levitt Bernstein practice was a conventional partnership but profits were shared. In encouraging egalitarianism, Levitt and Bernstein recognised their own youth and inexperience and, explained Levitt, wanted to make it “a nice place to work”. Graduates arrived with portfolios of political tracts rather than drawings, but by 1977 they had 40 staff, including a high proportion of female architects. A scheme from that year was Hart Hill Lane, 33 sheltered flats for elderly people and 10 family homes in Luton. David was born in New York, the son of ambitious Jewish parents, Sol Bernstein, who worked for Miller Bros hats, and his wife, Diana. He read architecture at the University of Cincinnati before in 1962 he took Louis Kahn’s master class at the University of Pennsylvania. The same year he married Beverly Liden, an economist of Lutheran extraction whom he had known since high school. His parents were unhappy with the match and in 1964 the young couple determined on a fresh start and moved to London. They never returned. Both joined the staff of the Architectural Association, David to supplement his income working for William Whitfield and then Hodgkinson by teaching, while Beverly quickly rose to the rank of registrar and developed a new career as a planner. They were exceptionally close, with David retiring early to spend time with Beverly when in 2003 she was diagnosed with cancer. She died in 2012. He is survived by his brother, Edward, a niece, Lisa, and a grandniece, Aviva.

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Finding Nirvana at home

Finding Nirvana at home

The international design firm AGi architects have created a home on a grand scale in Kuwait

There are no words to define the concept of Nirvana, a mental state with effects in the physical and spiritual planes. This makes it difficult to explain and only those who practice meditation can understand how far they are from reaching it. These thoughts led AGi architects to name this project Nirvana. Words like “house”, “villa”, or “palace” fail to represent the scale of the building, its materialisation, or its spatial order. The architects prefer the term “home”. The features of a home are not physical, but rather emotional and affective, and Nirvana Home has been designed and built to satisfy the needs of the inhabitants in these terms. This home is also a reflection of the culture within which it is developed. In this sense, its point of contact with the location at ground level is a public floor dedicated to socialisation, for the gathering of family and friends. With this purpose in mind, the spaces were designed to look at one another, detached from the surroundings and interconnected through a series of courtyards. The series of geometric voids in grey polished marble contrasts with the exterior's white rough ceramic finish. The duality of textures is similar to that found in a marble quarry, where the polished geometric voids contrast with the natural mountain terrain. Inside Nirvana Home, little by little, step by step, the horizon and the sea begin to dominate and the building is marked by a formidable diagonal that displaces matter so as to reach maximum transparency, allowing rooms on different façades to look towards the sea. This strategy generates a string of empty spaces that become three-dimensional courtyards holding gardens at different heights and acting as shared spaces for parents and children. The last floor of Nirvana Home is where the private spaces are found, for the exclusive use of the parents who, from this privileged position, are able to preside over the indoor activities of the home without losing sight of the sea and the horizon. Nick Myall News editor

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Amphitheatre meets bridge on Kalix River

Amphitheatre meets bridge on Kalix River

Described by the architects as "a hybrid between an amphitheatre and a bridge” this structure will be a transport link as well as a place to watch the river flow...

The Swedish Traffic Administration has commissioned Erik Andersson Architects to design a proposal for a new bridge over Kalix River in Sweden. More than a mere crossing, the proposed bridge introduces a new public space where people can enjoy the sun and get closer to the water. It will also provide shelter from the elements thanks to a protected walkway. KBClip 08_000 from Erik Andersson on Vimeo.  The existing bridge over Kalix River will be replaced by a new one in 2019. As part of the initial design process, The Swedish Traffic Administration wanted to look into the possibility of introducing new features to the upcoming bridge, making it a central gathering place for the residents of Kalix. As a solution, Erik Andersson Architects came up with a proposal offering separate routes for vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists, as well as creating public spaces such as viewing platforms and seating areas. "The idea behind the bridge is to turn a simple crossing of the river into an experience and create a warm atmosphere. We also wanted to make it possible for people to get near the water surface and enjoy the view, while at the same time giving protection from the weather which can get harsh in this part of the country,” says Erik Andersson. "The bridge is a hybrid of an amphitheatre and a bridge. You can use it as you wish; sit down and watch the river and the view, pass under it by boat or simply cross it by foot or bicycle.” KBClip 04_000 from Erik Andersson on Vimeo. In the design, car and cycle lanes running on top of the bridge are separated from pedestrians below. The walkway is placed under the driveway, using the top as a roof and facing south in order capture the warmth of the sun.  This is Erik Andersson’s first project in Kalix, a municipality located in Norrbotten County in northern Sweden. The firm has previously designed bridges in Norrköping, Hammarby Sjöstad and Nynäshamn, and is currently working on a new bridge in Hagastaden, Stockholm, Sweden. "Kalix is a fantastic place, with a stunning archipelago and of course the best fish roe on Earth, the Kalix löjrom,” Andersson says. ”I’m hoping this bridge could become a new landmark project for the municipality and add to its unique character.” KBClip 01_000 from Erik Andersson on Vimeo. Nick Myall News editor

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IN BRIEF

David Chipperfield Architects Works 2018

An exhibition at the Basilica Palladiana, Vicenza, Italy. 12 May &ndas

Darling Associates expands leadership

Following the studio’s continued strong performance, Darling Ass

Woods Bagot Announces New China Head

Stephen Jones has been appointed Regional Executive Chair, China, for

EVENTS

22.02.2018 

Annual Architecture & Design Film Festival 
Annual Architecture & Design Film Festival Washington D.C. from February 2 

12.03.2018 

Facade Tectonics 
BEYOND THE DIALOGUE SKINS on Campus: Bridging industry and academia in pur 

20.03.2018 

Planning for High Density Housing 
The population of most of our major towns and cities is rising rapidly, put 

Skipping from level to level

Skipping from level to level

A unique ‘skip floor plan’ gives this home in South Korea a distinctive look while making the most of a relatively small plot

From the architects… Designed by KDDH, the ‘Slow House’ is located in Ulsan, South Korea.  It is situated on a rectangular site facing the foot of Mt. Hwangbang. Since it is expected that there will be a lot of traffic and mountain climbers in the area, it was necessary to design a building which protects user privacy. Therefore, the design was started with the intention of separating a private area from a public area. First, the shape of the mass was decided as a form wrapping the space and embracing the nearby mountain. The lower part of the plot is used as a buffer zone where the private area and the public areas are separated. The inner space of this house is roughly separated into three hierarchies: a family area, children’s area, and a parent’s area. The staircase was used in order to clarify and connect these hierarchies. The family area located in the lowest part of the house includes a kitchen, dining room, and other elements for the purpose of family activity. In order to embrace various programs in a compact area, a ‘skip floor plan’ that is dislocated every half storey was planned instead of a traditional method that separates spaces using walls and furnitures. Using the skip floor plan a large volume of space compared to the size of the area could be obtained. Light flooding the centre of the building was utilised to fill the space. On the second floor, a study room and the first buffer area are found.  Through this study room a space where it is possible to look down the living room and communicate with each other was created. Also, it was planned that the children can pass through the family area by arranging the bedroom where such a formation can be seen. Each room has a small size, but, has a different shape of a ceiling to form a unique feeling of space. Again, the staircase leads you half story up to the second buffer area. The low corridor divides the space for parents and children, and it is also used as an approaching area for a bathroom. This area for the husband and wife is separated from other spaces at the highest location, but it is possible to access the children and family areas easily. In addition, an attic is located at the end of the staircase. The large-sized attic can be used as a separate space for children and guests. 

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Zigzag rooftops pierce the sky

Zigzag rooftops pierce the sky

This Canadian home sets itself apart with the striking contours of its angular rooftop

Negotiating the steep topography of a lake-side site, this holiday house, designed by Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster consists of two volumes stacked on one another. The lower volume nestles into the landscape so that it is barely visible as one first approaches the house. The upper volume rests on the lower one and on a concrete pier to form both a bridge and a cantilever. This massing strategy allows for increased access and permeability of the site and emphasizes the charged relationship between the building and the ground. The upper volume contains living spaces and opens up towards the lake while the lower volume is more enclosed and houses bedrooms. Responding to the need for accessibility for guests with disabilities, as well as thinking of the clients’ ability to use the building far into the future, a study/bedroom and accessible bathroom are provided on the main level. The roof of the lower bar becomes a terrace allowing elevated views and a direct connection to the living spaces. The factory-inspired skylights are rotated to admit north light without heat gain while orienting the solar panels due south so the house can generate all of its own power. The combination of vertical skylights and a fully glazed south-facing facade result in a generously daylit interior. A covered walkway shades the main wall of glass from summer sun while admitting lower winter sun to passively heat the dark-dyed concrete floor. Simple, low-maintenance, long-life materials are used on the facade, including a reflective standing seam metal roof and a lapped heat-treated (petrified) wood cladding, while the interior is lined with formaldehyde-free plywood. Playful elements are placed throughout from a glazed brick socle for the wood stove, to scattered colourful coat-hooks and a custom undercroft swing-bench. [Source V2com] Nick Myall News editor

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The Times they are a-changin'…

The Times they are a-changin'…

Michael Hammond, Editor in Chief of WAN continues WAN’s Shoptalk series of podcasts...

Coming soon, Shoptalk interviews Gordon Wright, Senior Vice President, Director of Workplace Global, HOK about their recently published report, The New Financial Workplace. Gordon’s team have researched and amassed a huge of amount data to try and navigate a way forward in the design of workplaces in this volatile sector. Encompassing diverse topics such as talent wars, VR, changing metrics, neighbourhood-base Choice environments, Block Chain, human habits and beach towel syndrome! HOK’s clients have included Nasdaq, Harris Bank, Sun Life Financial, Union Bank and Scotiabank Click here to subscribe Shoptalk and for a notification when the podcast is published. Michael Hammond Editor in Chief

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Creating a crossroads in Amsterdam

Creating a crossroads in Amsterdam

The Sloterdijk skyline in Amsterdam is set for a new landmark

Team Crossroads is the winner of the biggest ever Amsterdam housing construction tender. With a specification of over 30,000 sq m, Crossroads responds to the ever-growing demand for good, sustainable and affordable homes in the Randstad, the Dutch megalopolis. With its polder roofs and green terraces and façades, Crossroads sets out to create a more environmentally friendly Amsterdam. Crossroads realizes an unprecedented urban quality thanks to its beautiful architectural profile. Due to its modular structure, the tower has optimum flexibility and differentiation. In addition, it will house public facilities aimed at the neighbourhood as well as residents. Spatial quality and ensuring social safety are key design drivers. The overall concept with its two striking residential towers refers to a weathered rock in a green valley, which gradually becomes narrower and more angular. On and around the second ground level, greenery grows along the towers. This ‘Green Hug’ provides climate control, collects surplus water, reduces noise and improves air quality. The rainwater runs down the façades and terraces, flowing into a basin in the shape of a reflective pond with lilies in the ‘Secret Garden’. In this mysterious place to visit beneath the railway bridge, people and nature meet each other in an industrial landscape. The Secret Garden connects the two residential areas with each other. In this garden are green terraces, a plank bridge, a walkway through the water, artificial lighting and light art. Various artists will show their work here. The 90-metre- high western glass tower is slender and rectangular, the open treatment of its corners offering maximum views. The east tower is 40 metres high and is the student-housing tower, dynamically constructed from rotated blocks. All facilities are concentrated at the entrance, which is located on the station side. In addition to the various state-of- the-art techniques applied to the acoustics, climate control system and water storage, a special feature is that it is even possible to control housing costs. Team Crossroads is a collaboration between TBD and MVSA Architects, with partners Kondor Wessels Amsterdam, Delva Landscape Architects, De Dakdokters, VIAC and Klimaatgarant. Construction will begin at the end of 2019. Nick Myall News editor

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Snøhetta designs "Svart" - the world’s first energy positive hotel

Snøhetta designs "Svart" - the world’s first energy positive hotel

“Svart” is the first building to be built after the energy positive Powerhouse standard in a Northern climate

Not only does this new hotel reduce its yearly energy consumption by approximately 85% compared to a modern hotel, but it also produces its own energy - an absolute “must” in this precious arctic environment. In collaboration with Arctic Adventure of Norway, Asplan Viak and Skanska, Snøhetta has designed the world’s first Powerhouse* hotel, at the foot of the Svartisen glacier that runs through Meløy municipality in northern Norway. The name “Svart”, meaning "black" in Norwegian, is a direct tribute to the deep blue ice of Svartisen and the Svartisen name. As the word for "black" and "blue" are the same in old Norse, the name is a reference to the natural heritage of Svartisen, its precious glacier and its natural surroundings. Compared to an equivalent hotel built in accordance with modern building standards in Norway, the new hotel reduces yearly energy consumption by approximately 85%. The hotel is thus the first of its kind to be built in compliance with the Powerhouse standard and will also become the world’s northernmost Powerhouse building. Building in such a precious environment comes with some clear obligations in terms of preserving the natural beauty and the fauna and flora of the site. It was important for us to design a sustainable building that will leave a minimal environmental footprint on this beautiful Northern nature. Building an energy positive and low-impact hotel is an essential factor to create a sustainable tourist destination respecting the unique features of the plot; the rare plant species, the clean waters and the blue ice of the Svartisen glacier, says Founding Partner at Snøhetta, Kjetil Trædal Thorsen. A minimal footprint The circular body of “Svart” extends from the shoreline by the foot of the Almlifjellet mountain and into the clear waters of the Holandsfjorden fjord. The circular shape provides a panoramic view of the fjord and an experience of living in proximity with nature. The construction is inspired local vernacular architecture in the form of the “fiskehjell” (A-shaped wooden structure for drying fish) and the “rorbue” (a traditional type of seasonal house used by fishermen). The rorbue reference translates into the hotel’s supporting structure which is built from weather resistant wooden poles stretching several metres below the surface of the fjord. The poles ensure that the building physically places a minimal footprint in the pristine nature and gives the building an almost transparent appearance. The poles of the hotel double as a wooden boardwalk for visitors to stroll in the summer. In the winter, the boardwalk can be used to store boats and kayaks, reducing the need for garages and additional storage space. The height of structure also allows for paddlers to paddle under the hotel corpus. The precious nature surrounding the hotel can only be accessed by boat and there are plans to introduce an energy neutral boat shuttle from the city of Bodø to the hotel. An energy optimized design To reach the Powerhouse standard, several cutting-edge design choices have been made. For example, the architects have conducted an extensive mapping of how solar radiation behaves in relation to mountainous context throughout the year to optimize the harvest of energy. The result of the study has been an importance premise for the circular design of the hotel, and both hotel rooms, restaurants and terraces are strategically placed to exploit the Sun’s energy throughout the day and seasons. The hotel’s roof is clad with Norwegian solar panels produced with clean hydro energy reducing the carbon footprint even further. Secluded terraces provide a shadow play in the façade of the hotel while also ensuring privacy. The facades protect against insolation from the sun in the summer when the sun is high in the sky, removing the need for artificial cooling. During the winter months, when the sun is low in the sky, the large windows of the façade allow for a maximum of insolation to exploit the Sun’s natural thermal energy. Materials with low embodied energy have been used to reach the Powerhouse standard. Embodied energy is the amount of energy that is required to produce, transport, build and replace materials and products that go into a building. Embodied energy is highest in materials produced with energy derived from fossil fuels. The use of wood in construction and cladding minimizes the environmental impact of the building, and typically energy-intensive materials such as structural steel and concrete have been avoided as much as possible. About Arctic Adventure of Norway Arctic Adventure of Norway (subsidiary of Miris Eiendom) is the company behind Svart. The company’s ambition is to become a pioneer of sustainable tourism in Northern Norway. * About the Powerhouse standard and the Powerhouse collaboration Powerhouse is a collaboration between Snøhetta, Entra, Skanska, the ZERO Emission Resource Organization and Asplan Viak. The term “Powerhouse” is used to describe so-called “plus house” buildings that are built by the Powerhouse collaboration. “Plus houses” are energy producing buildings that, in the course of a 60 year period, will generate more renewable energy than the total amount of energy that would be required to sustain daily operations and to build, produce materials and demolish the building. Powerhouse is responsible for several plus house projects, including Norway’s first plus house, the world’s first rehabilitated plus house at Kjørbo in Sandvika, Norway. Today, Powerhouse is building a Montessori school in Drøbak, which opens in February 2018. In Trondheim, Powerhouse partner Entra is building a new Powerhouses at Brattørkaia in Telemark, R8 is building Powerhouse Telemark. Nick MyallNews editor The WAN Awards Future Projects category is now open for entries  Click here for more details  or email wanawards@haymarket.com    

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Tony Owen builds cotemporary Hill Town

Tony Owen builds cotemporary Hill Town

Sovereign Sylvania by Tony Owen Partners completed in Sydney

Sovereign consists of 23 town houses in Sylvania. The site has direct water frontage and panoramic views on the Georges River, Sothern Sydney. Half off the site has not been developed and remains bushland. This area contains dramatic native sandstone escarpments. A feature of the design is the ‘L-shaped’ town houses which capture sun-light and provide internal private space on the limited site. These town houses are arranged in three rows stepping down the site. Each is accessed from a pedestrian access laneway. The upper portion of the site contains a row of town houses which conform to the levels of the topography. These town houses are arranged around the main street or town square. In its use of topography and the interaction of communal pathways and defining private space the overall result resembles a medieval hill town. The ‘L-shaped’ dwellings create central green courtyards which creates an internal outlook and maximises sun to the bedrooms. The dwellings are stacked such that living areas address a terrace on the roof of the unit in front. The village feel is reinforced by using a limited palette of materials. This consists of white painted rendered masonry with off-form timber-textured concrete. The lower portions are clad in rough stone. Timber screens are added to further create warmth. The homogeneous materials adds a strength to the overall composition. The landscaping design has evolved through a detailed study of the existing topography and contours. The contours are expressed in the fractal geometry of the planting

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WIN Ceremony

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