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SUNDAY 21 DECEMBER 2014

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Wind-dyed house, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan

Thursday 27 Dec 2012
 

Nesting with sky

 
Kazuhiko Kishimoto / acaa 
 
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Award Entry

Deep eaves and stepped terraces connect the indoors and outdoors 

Wind-dyed house is a residential building located halfway up a cliff and overlooking the ocean. The architect decided that the appropriate form to build would be as low-lying as possible to allow the architecture to become embedded in the surrounding landscape and minimize the impact of the building on its environment.

The design of the walls played an important role in creating the overall sense of presence that the building projects: the task was to prevent the walls of Wind-dyed House from becoming surfaces that would obstruct or impede movement and sight. Glass and screens along the enclosed perimeter of the house gives the second floor of this residence a certain transparency. Slender, deep-set eaves cast deep shadows on the facade of the building, softening the impact of the building's physical presence in relation to its environment.

The various components of the building were structured in order to allow the inhabitants to enjoy a different view of the outside on each level. A steel-reinforced concrete structure was used for the second floor, and a Vierendeel bridge structure supports a large, thin roof on top which giving the appearance of floating.

The pillars consist of square solid iron cylindrical poles, measuring 75mm across, arranged in a densely packed formation using wooden modules (900 by 1800mm). By creating several areas of low-level rigidity, the architects were able avoid the need for braces.

Key Facts

Status Completed
Value Undisclosed(m€)
Were you involved in this scheme?
acaa
www.ac-aa.com

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