WAD 2014

WEDNESDAY 20 AUGUST 2014

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World Architecture Day 2014
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Blesso Loft, New York, United States 
Thursday 30 Oct 2008
 
A green machine for living 
 
Peter Aaron/ESTO 
 
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04/11/08 Andreas, Copenhagen
In which way is this project "eco-friendly"? Using timber decking and plants does not mean that the project is eco friendly. Without being an expert I imagine that the large glazed areas, high ceilings and what appears to be uninsulated exterior walls (1st picture) would make it very demanding to keep warm in the NY winters. Also I can't see much solar screening -does it not get really warm in the summer and will it need mechanical ventilation? There are certainly lots of air-con fittings on the pictures. Spending energy on keeping the place warm/cold means CO2 emmissions. CO2 emissions are not eco-friendly. Or am I wrong?
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02/11/08 lynda, london
I think that planting that much of gegetation inside the living space or a bedroom is consideribly not healthy during the night and i find that the ceiling are too high and this amount of space could have been used in a different maner in order to make it more useful
 

Editorial

Joel Sanders completes eco-friendly NYC penthouse 

This Noho loft for real estate developer Matthew Blesso offers a fresh take on green architecture, demonstrating that you don’t have to forgo high style in the interest of saving the planet.

Designed by New York architect Joel Sanders with associate architect Andrea Steele and landscape designer, Balmori Associates, the design of this 3200 sq ft loft is predicated on the notion that if you merge building and landscape, by bringing nature in and pushing living space to the outdoors, unexpected things can happen.

The loft’s interior is awash in lush vegetation, sustainable woods and natural fibers. Exterior wood decking and plants flow into the heart of the penthouse forming a “planted core” that separates the private and public realms. A glass wall separates the bathroom from the planted zone, allowing the owner to bathe surrounded by vegetation. This “living wall” links the interior to the roof. An open staircase provides access to a rooftop garden planted with grasses and sedum, which has been transformed into a veritable “living” room furnished with a mini-kitchen, a large movie screen, and an outdoor shower surrounded by lush vegetation.

Sharon McHugh
US Correspondent

(Associate Architect Andrea Steele www.andarchitects.com

Key Facts

Status Complete
Value 0(m€)
Joel Sanders Architect
www.joelsandersarchitect.com
 
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