WAD 2014

TUESDAY 29 JULY 2014

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Titan Crane and Visitor Centre, Glasgow, United Kingdom 
Tuesday 23 Sep 2008
 
Glasgow Titan wins awards battle 
 
 
 
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05/10/08 Trounson, Greymouth NZ
We visited the titan crane in sept 08. he directtion to find it from the brochures provided was very difficult for someone out of town. Once we arrived we found a warm welcome with no rush to be moved on to the crane from the visitor center.
Before we boarded the bus, i notice rust streaks on the left rear wheel.
we went to the crane and received commentry about the old ship yards
On the ground I asked questions about the restoration however the guide didnt know anything about it, he tried to ask questions via a radio but didnt really know much.
After going up the lift I ask questions about the lifting capacity, however the guides had very little idea about weight over radius.
The video discriptions which were running was very good as well as other interpretation panels.
After we went down again, and about to board the bus, I checked the rust marks on the rear wheel only to find the whel nuts had unwound by half an inch and driver had no idea or willingness to tighten the wheel nuts and drove back with loose rear wheel and passengers on board, he then telephoned someone and left a message on his answerphone. I offered to assit him in tightening them and he said he didnt have a wheel brace.

The office staff were very friendly, some excellent merchandice available too.
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Editorial

The Scottish city’s iconic crane wins International Award for Architecture for new visitor centre 

As the strongest symbol of Glasgow’s industrial heritage the Titan Crane is well-loved in Scotland’s largest city. But following the addition of its visitor centre, designed by Collective Architecture, the structure is also receiving commendation from over-seas as it receives the prestigious Award for Architecture from the Chicago Athenaeum Museum.

Standing 150 feet above ground level the Titan been a key feature on the banks of the River Clyde since its construction in 1907. Collective Architecture's involvement in the project began in January 2003, having won a competition to develop a lighting strategy for the Titan Clydebank. It soon became apparent that The Titan’s historical and cultural importance merited full restoration, with the potential to attract serious funding: in addition to being an iconic monument for Clydebank, it could also become a unique visitor attraction.

The restoration involved shot-blasting the old paint and rust to bring the structure back to bare steel before applying primer coats and a final top coat. The new stair and lift shafts are steel frames clad in a robust aluminium cladding to reference the industrial heritage of the site. The lift shaft is punctured with tall windows providing spectacular glimpses of the existing structure during ascent. The viewing platform is enclosed with a fine cable net fence and floored with an open mesh grating allowing visitors to walk along the jib, 150ft above the River Clyde, and soak in the exhilarating views. The wheelhouse has been refurbished to allow visitors to experience the huge lifting equipment, while information panels tell the story of the crane, the shipyard and the people who lived and worked around the Titan.

At night, illumination brings the Titan to life, silhouetting the diagonal structure with coloured and white light, and casting dramatic shadows on the quayside below.

The Titan is one of 14 British projects to be given the award and will feature as part of an exhibition in Athens in January and February before moving across Europe in June.

Key Facts

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Collective Architecture
www.collectivearchitecture.com
 
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