WAN Awards 2018

TUESDAY 19 JUNE 2018

SEARCH   
Subscribe to News Review free now
  • SEND US NEWS
  • WAN AWARDS
  • ECOWAN
  • SECTOR NEWS
  • METRO NEWS
  • Tech Spot
  • News in Pictures News in Pictures
WAN Jobs
News Review
Podcasts
WAN Urban Challenge
WAN Awards

A façade for all seasons

Lead News

MVRDV 

Golden light shines through this façade to create a marble-veined effect that changes with the light conditions

Bulgari’s flagship store in Kuala Lumpur has opened with a new façade that imagines the luxury brand’s heritage, and experiments with traditional materials. The storefront is the first in a series of MVRDV façade designs for the luxury brand. This concrete and resin facade is permeated by gold light to create a marble-veined façade. For over a century, Bulgari has set the pace for Italian style with a forward-looking, creative spirit that draws inspiration from the timeless beauty of Roman art, while giving it a distinctive contemporary touch. MVRDV’s design draws on inspiration from the luxury brand’s heritage. The cornice of via Condotti is a set element used asymmetrically in different locations over the world, and its iconic marble façade now reinvented and reinterpreted by material experiments. In Kuala Lumpur, a façade wh

... read more

Glasgow School of Art devastated by fire

Glasgow School of Art devastated by fire

The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service incident commander at the scene of the Glasgow School of Art fire said the building was in a poor state

A massive fire has devastated Glasgow's famous art school building for the second time in four years. According to the BBC, firefighters were called to the celebrated Mackintosh building at about 23:20 on Friday 15th June. When they arrived the fire was already "well-developed". At one point 120 firefighters and 20 fire engines were at the scene. The firefighters used water from the nearby  River Clyde to tackle the blaze with fire crews  from as far away as Perth and West Lothian attending the scene. Fire service area manager David Young said the building was in a "poor state" with extensive damage to the roof, the floors and the interiors Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said the fire was "heartbreaking" Ms Sturgeon said the damage was far worse than four years ago and the building was "just a shell" She promised the Scottish government would do all it could to help Fire chiefs said they could not say how or where the fire started Neighbouring buildings including the ABC music venue have also been damaged The fire is all the more devastating as it comes within weeks of the 150th anniversary of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s birth and as celebrations were taking place to mark this event. Read WAN’s profile of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and his work here. Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Clifton Cathedral renovation completes

Clifton Cathedral renovation completes

Purcell has completed £3.1m of repairs on the 1970’s church since May 2015

Purcell, the architects, master planners and heritage consultants, has completed repairs to the Roman Catholic Cathedral Church of SS. Peter and Paul in Clifton, Bristol, in the UK, making Britain’s last major church building watertight for the first time. Purcell worked closely with the client, Clifton Diocese, to improve the internal environment while respecting the architecture of the brutalist structure, with detailed design proposals that harmonise with the richness of the iconic building. Purcell has completed £3.1m of repairs since May 2015, part-funded by £1.4m of grants from the World War 1 Centenary Cathedral Repairs Fund; the biggest beneficiary being the pitched roof which required 86 tons of replacement lead – the largest lead roofing project in Britain at the time. The Cathedral remained in use during the renovation process, hosting eight masses each week, numerous baptisms, weddings, funerals and special services. Purcell addressed the physical repairs that the building so desperately needed, but also focused attention on the internal conditions to provide better improved levels of comfort to the building’s users and visitors. A condition of the project’s funding was that it opened up parts of the building to the public that has previously been inaccessible: this includes full access to the gallery over the iconic baptistery; and re-opening of a staircase that had previously been sealed off. Clifford Martin, Partner at Purcell’s Bristol office, said: ‘Our conviction was for the building to become watertight, and safe and open for use, but also not to lose any of its rigour and quality as a superb exponent of the late brutalist era. The works have been undertaken with the intention to both repair and protect the building, and to magnify and celebrate its original design and detail. The Cathedral, in common with many buildings of its type and era, was built in difficult times. Our aim for the repairs projects was, at all times, to consider what the intent for its design and execution had been in order to remain true to the building’s principles.’ The work carried out by Purcell takes care to retain the brutalist building’s high-quality concrete aesthetic, which in many areas was distinctively board-marked with the coarse grain of Russian Redwood planks. The design and installation of new services keeps the Cathedral safe and open, preventing further deterioration to the building fabric and offers a long-term solution to the underlying problems of the original construction, making the building fully fit for purpose for both worshipers and visitors. Design Statement Originally constructed between 1969–73 to the designs of Ron Weeks of the Percy Thomas Partnership, Grade II* listed Clifton Cathedral was critically acclaimed for its serenity and simplicity, and the modest ‘theatre-like’ composition of its irregular, elongated hexagonal plan. However, the building was never fully watertight and, despite numerous attempts to resolve the problem, the leakages remained unresolved. 45 years of water ingress caused damage to the internal finishes as well as affecting the unseen structure and services. The practice worked closely with the Lead Sheet Association to ensure that rigorous standards were met while instigating minimum impact on the building’s historical aesthetic. Although the result is modestly different from the original roof, the quality of the leadwork will ensure its long-term survival. Leakage was also present in the Cathedral’s concrete cladding and Purcell’s research took the architects deep into the building’s archives in a move to comprehend, from the original drawings, the causes of the problems. This was followed by hands-on studies to understand the construction details of the concrete cladding, the composition of the joints behind the panels, and how each unit was reinforced. Appropriate repairs were undertaken to address spalling, using Corennie granite chippings matched from the original construction of the precast cladding panels. Internal human comfort factors were unmaintainable prior to Purcell’s intervention. The building’s glazing required an urgent update from double-glazed Georgian wired glass – some of which was slipping from its framing causing draught and leakage – to a self-cleaning thermally-broken system. Poor quality, low-illuminance artificial lighting was inadequate for modern-day requirements and difficult to replace safely. Lighting design consultancy Lighting Design and Technology designed a fully dimmable, ultra-bright LED system which maximises the potential of the original lighting plans which were never effectively realised. The building’s formerly-inefficient heating has been redesigned by M&E consultant Method in a custom-built plant room extension. The wiring has been replaced making the Cathedral properly fit for purpose and safe to use. Nick Myall News editor

... read more

 Creating a spin at The Old Vinyl Factory

Creating a spin at The Old Vinyl Factory

The Boiler House, an innovative 54-home cross-laminated timber building designed by Studio Egret West in The Old Vinyl Factory regeneration project in Hayes, UK, has completed

Designed by Studio Egret West and built by Henry Construction, The Boiler House provides 54 stylish studio, one- and two-bed for-sale homes, with floor-to-ceiling windows, sleek kitchens and spacious balconies. The building’s distinctive stainless-steel shingle façade and bright orange staircase cover a cross-laminated timber structure – this provides a range of environmental and thermal benefits, as well as enabling an ultra-efficient construction process. The Boiler House also offers roof top allotments for residents to grow their own vegetables and plants. Two ground floor retail units are placed on either side of the bright and colorful entrance lobbies.     With prices starting from £270,000, many of the units at The Boiler House have been available through London Help to Buy. Located a short walk from the new Hayes & Harlington Elizabeth Line station, which will provide 20 minute journeys into central London, the homes have proven very popular with buyers, with over 80% sold prior to completion and only a handful now remaining. HUB and Bridges are jointly developing a number of lower-cost housing developments across Greater London, in line with Bridges’ focus on investing in emerging locations. Altogether the separate projects could deliver over 1,500 homes with a combined value of over £500m. The Boiler House is the first of these projects to reach completion. Steve Sanham, Managing Director at HUB said: “We’re really excited to complete this unique scheme in Hayes – a rapidly evolving and well-connected part of west London, and a great location to live and work. As the first for-sales homes to complete as part of the Old Vinyl Factory, this is also a real milestone for the wider regeneration site. The Boiler House is exactly what we aim to deliver with all of our schemes: environmentally responsible, attainable homes for local people, designed and finished to a high specification.”  Simon Ringer, Partner and Head of Property Funds at Bridges Fund Management, said: “London desperately needs more high-quality, lower-cost housing to meet the needs of its ever-growing population. The projects we are developing with HUB in underserved areas of London draw on the latest sustainable design and construction techniques. It is great to see the first of these innovative projects reach completion, and we look forward to welcoming the first residents into The Boiler House.” Lucas Lawrence, Director at Studio Egret West, said: “The Boiler House reflects the unusual form of the steam chimney that once served the EMI Factory, the birthplace of so much influential music. The cluster of tapered volumes use a metal cladding that is inspired by the original industrial structures along with a sustainable cross laminated timber structure that has broken new ground for this type of construction. We are delighted that this first residential building of the new neighbourhood is being so well received by the residents and thank HUB for their commitment to delivering such a high quality and distinctive building.” Led by U+I, the £250 million Old Vinyl Factory masterplan is a mixed-use regeneration project on the 17-acre former EMI site, which made records for a variety of big names in British Rock n’ Roll until the late 1970s. Once completed, the redevelopment will include up to 642 homes, 550,000 sq. ft. of commercial space, leisure facilities and extensive new public realm. The Old Vinyl Factory will also be home to HUB and Bridges’ Material Store – 189 PRS apartments for rent managed by Fizzy Living – which is due to be completed next month. The Modern House is the agent for The Boiler House. Nick Myall News editor

... read more

IN BRIEF

Right to Build Task Force announces five free days of support for organisations working to deliver new community-led housing

The Right to Build Task Force is offering five organisations up to fiv

Darling Associates expands northwards with the acquisition of specialist practice Architect-CT

Darling Associates, the multi award winning architectural studio, cele

Will Alsop 1947- 2018

Sad news today as we learn of Will Alsop’s death, one of archite

EVENTS

26.05.2018 

Collateral event of 16th International Architecture Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia 
La Biennale di Venezia - Hong Kong Exhibition 6 May – 25 November, 2018 

29.06.2018 

Immersive Technology in the Built Environment 
Immersive Technology in the Built Environment is a brand new conference loo 

 Let the games commence!

Let the games commence!

The centrepiece of the Russian World Cup has been lovingly restored and brought up to date

The 2018 World Cup is upon us, with the opening ceremony, several key matches and the final taking place at the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow. The magnificent building has been refurbished by SPEECH architectural office and Mosinzhproekt. Luzhniki Stadium was designed and built in 1955-1956 under the supervision of architect Alexander Vlasov. In 1980 Luzhniki was the main arena for the Olympics. It has been closed for reconstruction since 2013. The key objectives of the reconstruction project made by SPEECH architectural office (Moscow) has been to preserve the stadium’s external appearance (the stadium’s historical wall and roof) as an icon of Russian sport and to fulfil all FIFA’s requirements with regard to floor areas and capacity. The task facing the planners and designers was to fit all the required functions into the existing geometry. The renewed Large Sports Arena now has a maximum capacity of 81 000, which is 3000 more than previously. Furthermore, prior to reconstruction, approximately 10% of seats in the stadium were in a zone where there were limited views of play. The stands have for this reason been replaced with two tiers raked at a steeper angle; additionally, there is a third tier consisting of 100 skyboxes. These changes mean that football fans now have a great view of the pitch from any point in the stands (including the bottom and top rows). There are also new comfortable VIP boxes with capacity for 1950 spectators. The stadium’s external appearance has also been lovingly preserved, including the colonnade girdling the stadium, the inside wall, and the shape and sculptural form of the roof. Behind the historical wall an internal street has been created; its main feature is eye-catching cascades of staircases, which serve as the main channel for spectators to get move around the stadium. The only new element on the façade is a frieze in the form of a broad metal strip on which images of symbols of various types of sport have been created using perforations. A 23-metre-high viewing platform is situated at the very top of the stands and will be open to all.  Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Morpheus opens its doors

Morpheus opens its doors

A new flagship hotel designed by Zaha Hadid Architects for the City of Dreams resort in Macau, opens Friday 15 June

Asia’s most popular entertainment destination, Macau welcomed more than 32 million tourists in 2017, with visitor numbers increasing every year. Located in Cotai, Macau, City of Dreams is a leading integrated resort including casino, two theatres, shopping district, 20 restaurants and four hotels. Informed by the fluid forms within China’s rich traditions of jade carving, the Morpheus’ design combines dramatic public spaces and generous guest rooms with innovative engineering and formal cohesion. Conceived as a vertical extrusion of its rectangular footprint, a series of voids is carved through its centre to create an urban window connecting the hotel’s interior communal spaces with the city and generating the sculptural forms that define the hotel’s public spaces. Linked at ground level with the surrounding three-storey podium of the City of Dreams resort, the Morpheus houses 770 guest rooms, suites and sky villas, and includes civic spaces, meeting and event facilities, gaming rooms, lobby atrium, restaurants, spa and rooftop pool, as well as extensive back-of-house areas and ancillary facilities. The design resolves the hotel’s many complex programmes within a single cohesive envelope.  Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) was commissioned to build the hotel in 2012. At that time, foundations were already in place of a condominium tower that did not progress. ZHA designed the Morpheus as a simple extrusion of the existing abandoned foundations; using this rectangular footprint to define a 40-storey building of two internal vertical circulation cores connected at podium and roof levels where the many guest amenities were required. This extrusion generated a monolithic block making best use its development envelope that is restricted to a 160m height by local planning codes. This block was then ‘carved’ with voids. The underlying diagram of the hotel’s design is a pair of towers connected at ground and roof levels. The central atrium in-between these towers runs the height of the hotel and is traversed by external voids that connect the north and south facades. These voids create the urban window that links the hotel’s interior communal spaces with the city. Three horizontal vortices generate the voids through the building and define the hotel’s dramatic internal public spaces; creating unique corner suites with spectacular views of both the atrium and the city. This arrangement maximises the number of hotel rooms with external views and guarantees an equal room distribution on either side of the building. In-between the free-form voids that traverse the atrium, a series of bridges create unique spaces for the hotel’s restaurants, bars and guest lounges by renowned chefs including Alain Ducasse and Pierre Hermé. The atrium's twelve glass elevators provide guests with remarkable views of the hotel’s interior and exterior as they travel between the voids of the building. As one of the world's leading hotels, the Morpheus' interior spaces necessitated a high degree of adaptability to accommodate the many varying requirements of its guest amenities. The building’s exoskeleton optimizes the interiors by creating spaces that are uninterrupted by supporting walls or columns. The world’s first free-form high-rise exoskeleton, its rich pattern of structural members at lower levels progresses upwards to a less dense grid of lighter members at its summit. Morpheus draws on a ZHA’s 40 years of research into the integration of interior and exterior, civic and private, solid and void, Cartesian and Einsteinian. Space is woven within structure to tie disparate programmes together and constantly make connections. Viviana Muscettola, ZHA's project director explains, "Morpheus combines its optimal arrangement with structural integrity and sculptural form. The design is intriguing as it makes no reference to traditional architectural typologies. "Macau’s buildings have previously referenced architecture styles from around the world. Morpheus has evolved from its unique environment and site conditions as a new architecture expressly of this city. "The expertise of all members of the Morpheus team has created new possibilities for architecture," continued Muscettola. "The comprehensive parametric model combined all of the hotel's aesthetic, structural and fabrication requirements and will radically change how our built environment is planned and constructed.” Lawrence Ho, chairman and CEO of Melco Resorts said, “From the very beginning, we shared ZHA’s vision and determination to push boundaries. Morpheus offers a journey of the imagination. From the curved exterior to the dramatic interior spaces, it pleases the eye and excites the senses: a contemporary masterpiece to be enjoyed by many generations to come.” Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Unveiling the ‘micro vertical city’

Unveiling the ‘micro vertical city’

This tower radically transforms the soulless skyscraper into a highly livable and sustainable environment

Against the backdrop of China’s homogenous urban development and the ubiquitous rise of post-modernist skyscrapers, Vanke Yun City boldly presents an alternative office tower typology. It responds to the sub-tropical climate in Shenzhen, promotes urban integration, facilitates social interaction, and proposes an exciting programmatic mix that radically transforms the soulless skyscraper into a highly livable, humane and sustainable micro vertical city. The building is shaped as a laid down Chinese character “?” with three tower blocks attached to a central T-shape core. On the ground, the entire building foot-print and the reception lobby are lifted, returning the previous land to the public as a sheltered and porous activity space. Green and water features are integrated with open or shaded plazas to create a series of accessible and functional urban space. In the air, twelve 7-storey high “knolls” with their silhouette outlined by greenery extrude out and float on the three sides of the building. Drawing inspiration from the natural landscape and mountain parks in Shenzhen, these “knolls” will introduce rich amenities and landscape into the skyscraper, celebrating human scale and nature in the high-rise. The top level of each knoll is where the refuge floor and public lift lobby are situated. It serves as an open community space where rich program and lush landscapes are integrated. Cascading down the sides of the knoll are pockets of semi-public sky gardens that further ameliorate the working environment. The inside of these knolls are planted valleys and gullies that further reinforce the garden working environment. These sessions of micro-climate create alluring ambiance with natural light and fresh air inside the office building. The three tower blocks split from each other and vary in sizes, stimulating an elegant rhythmic proportion and maximizing natural daylighting, natural ventilation and views into the office space. The 217.8m tall West block has a standard floor plate of 28.4m x 37.4m. The North-East block and the South-East block have the same footprint of 23.2m x 28.4m and are capped at 246.6m. Curtain wall system with extruded vertical mullions further emphasize the verticality of the blocks and endows the building with a sleek iconic image. At night, the mullions on the top portion of three blocks will become glowing highlights that outline the elegant figure of this landmark architecture.  A total of 10,490 m² of public space and 7835 m² of sky gardens, planter terraces, green walls and water features are provided to the 150,000 m² of office space. Given a site area of 8,087 m², the design is able to achieve a 130% “community plot ratio” and almost 100% “green plot ratio” which contribute to its typological breakthrough. The WAN Residential Award 2018 is open for entries  Click here for more details or email wanawards@haymarket.com Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Woods Bagot takes to the skies

Woods Bagot takes to the skies

Designs for San Francisco International Airport’s new Terminal One aims to ‘bring back the romance and excitement of air travel’

New images revealing the scale and quality of the redevelopment of Terminal 1, Boarding Area B at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) have been unveiled. The release of the designs by international architecture practice Woods Bagot, in joint venture with HKS Architects, comes as construction starts on the 4750m project, which is expected to complete in 4 phases between 2019 and 2022. Working closely with shell and core architects HKS, the interior designs by Woods Bagot highlight SFO’s commitment to customer hospitability, including a spacious concourse that integrates art, restaurants, and retail showcasing the best in Bay Area fare and integrated technology to facilitate the passenger journey. Carsten Voecker, Woods Bagot Director in San Francisco, explains: “The new terminal has been designed with passengers’ comfort and enjoyment in mind, with experts from Woods Bagot’s retail, transport and hospitality teams working together with SFO’s stakeholders to create the ideal airport terminal that will bring back the romance and excitement of air travel”. The concept for the design is ‘Bay Area Naturalism’: a celebration of the environment of Northern California. It includes a variety of curated spaces that encourage either speed and efficiency or quietude and relaxation, depending on their function. A variety of natural materials including wood and stone will be deployed, with contrasting hard and soft edges juxtaposed to reflect the diverse social ethos of the Bay Area community. The new terminal will include a series of character areas, including a sophisticated, cosmopolitan ‘marketplace’ and a ‘park’ area designed to have an outdoor feel and encourage play. James Berry, global transport leader at Woods Bagot, said: “Now that construction has started on the redevelopment of terminal one, I am delighted to provide a more detailed insight into this exciting project. I hope that Bay Area residents and visitors alike will be excited by the huge changes that are on their way – when complete, SFO will rank among the very best airports in the world. Woods Bagot is tremendously proud to be part of the project and showcase its customer centric approach to design. I look forward to sharing further details of future phases soon.” The WAN Future Projects Transport Award 2018 is open for entries  Click here for more details or email wanawards@haymarket.com    

... read more

Diller Scofido + Renfro and Woods Bagot win Adelaide design competition

Diller Scofido + Renfro and Woods Bagot win Adelaide design competition

Acclaimed New York architects with leading Adelaidean practice convince jury with concept design to create a dynamic new art space on Adelaide’s celebrated North Terrace

Arts South Australia and competition organisers Malcolm Reading Consultants has announced that the team led by Diller Scofidio + Renfro (US) with Woods Bagot (Australia) has won the Adelaide Contemporary International Design Competition. The winning team’s concept design reconciled the brief for a dynamic people-friendly new place with a skilfully-organised gallery, while also incorporating a performance lab, a dramatic ‘Super Lobby’, floating top-floor sky galleries and a suspended rooftop garden. The garden, inspired by ‘Minkunthi’, the Kaurna word ‘to relax’, would display the planting of a pre-colonised South Australian landscape, linking the idea of the contemporary to Kaurna ecological and cultural history. The building was described by the team in their presentation as a charismatic soft beacon on North Terrace that would reflect the sky by day and, at night, glow with galleries – allowing visitors to glimpse the art collection as they passed the building outside formal opening hours and, in this sense, ‘giving the art back to the city’. The nine-strong international jury, chaired by Michael Lynch AO CBE, found the concept design to be resonant to Adelaide, and its famous festival culture, promising to create spectacle and attract new audiences with dynamic, multipurpose spaces while also displaying a sound understanding of current art practice and offering a flexible but distinctive gallery configuration on a nine-square model. The decision follows a seven-month global search for an outstanding team to design a new cultural destination on part of the former Royal Adelaide Hospital (oRAH) site. The competition attracted submissions from 107 teams made up of circa 525 individual firms from five continents. The new gallery and public sculpture park is envisaged as one of the most significant new arts initiatives of 21st-century Australia, providing a national focal point for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art and cultures as well as new spaces for major exhibitions, and the opportunity to unlock the hidden treasures of South Australia’s State collections. Peter Louca, Executive Director of Arts South Australia, said: “I’d like to join the jury in thanking all six finalist teams for their high calibre presentations and congratulate Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot on their inspired design. The overwhelming global attention this process has invited from design, creative and infrastructure leaders and the world’s media has put the creation of Adelaide’s next great cultural destination on the international map. This was reflected in the high calibre of teams and proposals which challenged the international jury.” Michael Lynch AO CBE, chair of the jury and the Art Gallery of South Australia Board’s Special Advisor, said: “The winning team’s concept design responds to this once-in-a-generation opportunity for a landmark building in the heart of the city, positioned on the edge of the Botanic Garden. In a city famous for its festivals, the design creates a new place that embraces art in all of its forms and appeals to a broad audience, both local and international. The design foregrounds South Australia’s exceptional collections and capitalises on the momentum of the Art Gallery of South Australia’s recent successes in celebrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art and culture. The jury was impressed by the winning team’s assured understanding of the future of art, performance and 21st-century programming, as well as its flair for placemaking. It was an inspired insight by the winning team to conceive the building stepping down along the topography of the site and so creating a genuine connection to site and Country, respectful to the Kaurna people as well as integrating the Botanic Garden into the design.” Malcolm Reading, Competition Director, said: “The competition centred on healing Adelaide’s civic realm: the former hospital created a physical disconnect between the cultural boulevard and the Botanic Gardens – what better way to connect the two than by using art? The winning scheme is tightly-engineered, works the site hard, but is also a lot of fun. It has the potential to speak to new generations who are developing their own cultural identity, and offer a new focus for the city, much needed as Adelaide continues to grow and flourish. We would like to thank everyone who followed and entered the competition, and especially the five runners-up. There has been huge international interest – this is a moment for Adelaide.” New York-based Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) is consistently ranked as one of the world’s leading practices, famous for its role in creating the High Line in New York; the Broad contemporary art museum in Los Angeles; The Shed, New York’s first multi-arts centre; and the renovation and expansion of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York. The Adelaide win follows DS+R’s success last month in an international competition for the design of a new V&A collection and research centre to be located in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in East London. Woods Bagot, a leading Australian design firm, founded in Adelaide, has attracted global attention with its innovative SAHMRI building in Adelaide, and has developed its international profile by delivering projects for Apple and Google. The winning concept design can be viewed on the competition website at competitions.malcolmreading.com/adelaidecontemporary/shortlist The runner-up teams were (in alphabetical order): Adjaye Associates (London, UK) and BVN (Sydney, Australia); BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group (Copenhagen, Denmark) and JPE Design Studio (Adelaide, Australia); David Chipperfield Architects (London, UK) and SJB Architects (Sydney, Australia); HASSELL (Melbourne, Australia) and SO-IL (New York, USA); and Khai Liew (Adelaide, Australia), Office of Ryue Nishizawa (Tokyo, Japan) and Durbach Block Jaggers (Sydney, Australia). Adelaide is located on the traditional lands of the Kaurna people and the project site, close to the Art Gallery of South Australia and part of the former Royal Adelaide Hospital site, is rich in Kaurna heritage. All the finalist schemes went on show to the public on 12 May in an exhibition at the Art Gallery of South Australia that runs until 10 June; they are also available to view online through the competition website. The website received more than 242,000 page views from users in 148 countries during the process. The competition was run by independent organisers, Malcolm Reading Consultants, in accordance with the procurement and major project requirements of the Government of South Australia; the Conditions for the second stage of the competition were formally endorsed by the Australian Institute of Architects. The WAN Future Projects Civic Award 2018 is open for entries  Click here for more details or email wanawards@haymarket.com Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Rethinking the elevator

Rethinking the elevator

PLP Architecture has revealed the latest design for its SkyPod elevator featuring an innovative propulsion system based on Maglev technology

Despite many advances in technology, the elevator has not changed in over 150 years: a single cab hoisted up and down in an otherwise empty shaft. This shaft is one of the most expensive, underused and inefficient pieces of real estate in the world. At street level and below ground, as soon as a taxi cab or underground train passes, the next follows on its tail. These are looped transportation systems -- multi-directional, adaptable and super-efficient. Why shouldn’t elevators behave the same way? SkyPod is a research project that achieves this. With the advent of autonomous vehicles, a transport revolution is poised to radically transform the way we move within our cities. SkyPod leverages these advances and extends them vertically to achieve a three-dimensional urban mobility protocol that is on-demand, ultra-responsive and point-to-point. Imagine a fully-integrated digital and physical infrastructure in which your journey begins at home, pauses at your favourite cafe and ends directly on your 55th floor office. Throughout this journey, privacy and experience are paramount: catch up on your book or immerse yourself in the panoramic views of the city around you. SkyPod relies on a very physical and venerable piece of infrastructure – a track. The SkyPod track, however, can also tip, turn and twist to climb on the outer surface of buildings. Unlike the rigid up and down movement of an elevator, the SkyPod works like a gyroscope. It rotates so that its floor is always horizontal, using the same dynamic digital stabilisation systems of high-speed trains. Its movement is always gentle and your ears never pop. Propelling this is a linear induction motor system similar to that used by roller coasters and Maglev trains. Liberating vertical transport from the central core to the exterior of the building opens up opportunities for unprecedented architectural forms. If current skyscrapers often feel monolithic, self-contained and sometimes indifferent to their context, SkyPod will allow for new types of buildings that, despite their height, are holistically integrated with the grain of the city around them. The elevator has been a primary influence on the shape and appearance of the modern city to date. We believe that it’s inevitable demise will be the catalyst for the next chapter in the life of the city. The WAN Residential Award 2018 is open for entries  Click here for more details or email wanawards@haymarket.com Nick Myall News editor

... read more
Tenderstream
WORLD INTERIORS NEWS WAN URBAN CHALLENGE WORLD CITIES NETWORK

Sign up to News Review

Weekly news and features direct to your inbox

Thank you
for subscribing to
WAN News Review