WAN Awards 2018

THURSDAY 26 APRIL 2018

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Two becomes one in Norway...

Lead News

 

This house provides comfortable homes for two families, as well as an independent apartment on the lower level

The Two-in-One House is a calm piece of architecture resting on the steep and dynamic landscape of Ekeberglia. Its slender and rectangular form is manifested at the top of the sloping landscape.  From a concrete base, the building grows with a wooden clad body forming relation with the omnipresence of broadleaf trees surrounding the building topped with a light glass structure. With one foot in nature In the hills of Høvik municipality, the site features a very steep and rocky slope to the West, and a naturally low vegetation that stretches to the South. Though the project lies close to Ekeberglia, it visually distances itself from the small town with the ascending slope shielding the site. Humble in form simple in detail The project was early on given a simple rectangular form, to appear as a calming entity in a vivid landscape. Only the changing program of the building

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IMBE 2018

Zaha Hadid Architects redefine Milan

Zaha Hadid Architects redefine Milan

The Generali Tower at the heart of Milan’s CityLife masterplan heads for completion

Generali Tower designed by Zaha Hadid Architects is within the CityLife masterplan that has redeveloped Milan’s abandoned trade fair grounds following the fair’s relocation to Rho Pero in 2005. Located above the new Tre Torri station on Line 5 of the city’s metro system, CityLife opens the 90-acre site to year-round public use for the first time; providing new civic spaces, public parks and residential areas, in addition to shopping districts and corporate offices. When fully complete in 2020, CityLife will be the largest new civic space and public park created in the city since Parco Sempione opened 130 years ago; welcoming more than seven million visitors, workers and residents each year. CityLife will include 1,000 new homes, offices for more than 11,000 staff, the new 42-acre public park, piazzas and kindergarten. Aligned at ground level with three of the city’s primary axes that converge within CityLife, the 170m (44-storey) Generali Tower connects with its surrounding public piazzas and park; the curvilinear geometries of its podium defined by the perceived centripetal forces generated from the staggered intersection of these three city axes at the tower’s base. This vortex of centripetal forces at ground level is transferred vertically through the tower by realigning successive rhomboid-shaped floor plates to twist the tower about its vertical axis. This helical twist reduces incrementally with the height of each floor above street level, giving all floors a fractionally different relationship to the floors above and below. As the tower rises offering broader views across Milan, the twist orientates the tower's higher floors to the primary southeast axis leading to Bramante’s 15th Century tribune of  Santa Maria della Grazie, and beyond to the centre of the city. With its interiors to be completed this summer, Generali Tower will house up to 3,900 employees to meet their continued growth as one of the world’s largest financial institutions. The tower excels in all international benchmarks for efficiency while respecting Milan’s rigorous local building codes. Its double-façade of sun-deflecting louvers flanked by glazing provides extremely efficient environmental control for each floor and ensures excellent energy performance, contributing to Generali Tower’s LEED Platinum certification by the US Green Building Council. Inclined perimeter columns follow the twisting geometry of the tower to mirror the inclined alignment of its external façade units. These perimeter columns also maximise usable office space within the tower’s coherent formal envelope. An integral element of the CityLife redevelopment that has created a new civic, residential and business district near the centre of Milan, Generali Tower is defined by its surrounding urban fabric to connect directly with the city. Nick Myall News editor

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Retail with a cutting edge

Retail with a cutting edge

A new retail outlet for some of the world’s most high profile car brands has opened in Indonesia...

Astra Biz Centre has taken a challenge to propose a showroom complex on the unconventional typology of the site and become the part of the mixed use development in Bumi Serpong Damai (BSD). By taking the concept of an urban gallery, it offers a distinct experience on the junction with innovative operational solutions that integrate with sustainable design principles.   Hosting brands such as Toyota, Daihatsu, Isuzu, BMW, Peugeot, Honda, and other affiliate companies (AFFCO), the showrooms that being the main space were separated individually into pavilions. Taking an example of Honda’s showroom, the aerodynamic metal roof that reinforced the iconic theme of the automotive skin that appears to be floating in contrast with the lightness of the curtain wall below. The space in the middle of the open plaza form an avenue of walking gallery so the visitors can explore around the prestigious car showcase to experience the unique car dealership features. Besides that, the linear orientation of the showrooms with the shopfront facade facing the main road allow Astra Biz Centre to be an urban window to the public realm. The active frontage strategy and the low-rise scale of the showrooms give a connectivity between the showroom and the passersby, between the car display and the people. The placement of several open spaces, pedestrian facilities and large urban plaza are aimed to support the community’s interest for motor vehicles. Places such as the sunken plaza of AFFCO and the transitional space for pedestrians  in front of the showrooms are designed to carry out various activities and exhibitions for automotive enthusiasts. The implementation of ‘shared space zone’ principle allows cars, motorcycles and pedestrians to interact dynamically which support its function as a multipurpose gathering space. The public open spaces were placed on the east, in respond to the climate and enable the cross ventilation around the building. The project also displays an innovative solution to resolve operational functions. The placement of the workshops in the basement give maximum space for the public open area on the ground level. Meanwhile, wide openings facing the main street and void on the other end of the basement enable cross ventilation. Thus the combustion of the machine can be release to the open area. It demonstrates a distinctive approach to showroom and repair design which stands out amongst other Astra projects. Overall, Astra Biz Centre was designed not only as an ordinary complex of workshops, showrooms and offices, but also as a place for gathering and interactions in the emerging Bumi Serpong Damai. Due to its innovations, the design of Astra Biz Centre is believed to have the potential to set a benchmark in the future as a branch expansions. Nick Myall News editor

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PLP gets on track in Farringdon

PLP gets on track in Farringdon

Construction has begun on the PLP-designed Farringdon Crossrail station development - one of Britain’s biggest transport interchanges

Following appointment by Helical, PLP Architecture, which is acting as lead consultant on the East Ticket Hall new station development at Farringdon Crossrail Station, has unveiled images of the new office building above the station. The six-storey building will sit above the station's eastern ticket hall on Lindsey Street and offer 15,572 sq m of office space, with retail units on the ground floor. The OSD carefully integrates operational considerations of the Crossrail station with the requirements of a flexible workplace, to deliver a unified architectural solution. The site is bounded by the Smithfield Conservation Area to the west and the Charterhouse Square Conservation Area to the east and to the north. The building’s exterior was therefore carefully designed to reflect the style proportions and colour palette of architecture in the area and complement neighbouring buildings, including the adjacent Grade II* listed Smithfield market. PLP’s design interprets and reflects the use of colour and terracotta of the Victorian surroundings in Farringdon in a contemporary way. The building will similarly be clad with a terracotta framework, with piers featuring colour glaze on one side, which will provide subtle glimpses of unexpected colour to each elevation dependant on the viewing angle. The piers will directly reference colours in the surrounding streetscape context, each elevation responding to its particular environment either directly or with complimentary contrasting colours. The ground floor façade design, materials and colour palette will help animate the public realm while sign-posting the station entrance. Together with the station entrance, retail units will create an active frontage around the majority of the ground floor, which will benefit from 5.6m high ceilings. Daniel Moore, Architect at PLP Architecture said: “The prospect of seeing the materialisation of this carefully designed building, which we hope will galvanise and complete its context, is an exciting one. PLP Architecture has worked on the design of this building for a number of years and we look forward to seeing its cheerful and well-crafted elevations emerge over the coming months. Having initially enjoyed the committed and well guided patronage of Crossrail, we have more recently been fortunate that a visionary yet well-informed developer in Helical has taken the reins.” Matthew Bonning-Snook, Property Director at Helical plc, commented: “We are a great believer in the potential of the area given the significant impact of Crossrail and due to the wealth of cultural and public realm improvements that are planned and underway locally. Our adjacent office scheme overlooking Charterhouse Square, which is fully let, together with our Barts Square project which delivers a new urban quarter to the City and Smithfield, further highlights this belief.” Construction on site is due to begin shortly, with completion expected by October 2019. Nick Myall News editor

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IN BRIEF

Perkins+Will strengthens its London architecture team with new senior appointment

Global architecture and design firm Perkins+Will has appointed Brandon

LIAM FOX LAUNCHES AWARDS FOR BEST BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS OF THE FUTURE

International Trade Secretary, Dr Liam Fox MP, today launched the GREA

NBBJ London office announces strategic leadership additions

NBBJ, an international architecture firm celebrating its diamond anniv

EVENTS

10.05.2018 

National Planning Summit 
This year’s National Planning Summit is the must-attend forum for planning  

07.06.2018 

The LA Design Festival 
The LA Design Festival honors our city’s rich design culture and celebrates 

29.06.2018 

Immersive Technology in the Built Environment 
Immersive Technology in the Built Environment is a brand new conference loo 

WAN’s Urban Challenge gathers pace

WAN’s Urban Challenge gathers pace

The ideas competition for WAN’s Urban Challenge, ‘Reclaiming Our Streets’ has attracted 76 highly imaginative entries

Within the next decade or so, city streets will be redefined by two powerful events, the advent of autonomous vehicles and an increasing awareness of the health risks from vehicle pollution. Following the success of last year’s campaign, the WAN Urban Challenge www.wanurbanchallenge.com sets out to tackle the issues at hand, ensuring that good design is at the heart of the solution that cities will need. The global ideas competition set to bring together project proposals for new transformative urban schemes. A total of 76 projects have been submitted from a broad range of international architects including Perkins+Will, FXCollaborative, Perkins Eastman, Farrells, Gensler and Foster + Partners. Judging the projects is taking place in London on 24.4.18 with results coming soon. As part of the process of assessing the submitted projects, World Architecture News will assemble a Task Force made up of professionals from across the architectural, engineering, technology, commercial and planning spectrum who will assess the range of opportunities and proposals that focus on 'reclaiming our streets'. The Task Force will sit on 22nd May in London. Finally, The World Architecture News ‘Reclaiming the Streets’ Symposium will take place at the NLA in central London on the 20th of September where the blueprint, enshrining the key issues and best proposals for reimagining our city streets will be presented to a panel of city leaders and then debated and discussed. An audience of over 200 experts and decision makers from across the architectural, engineering and planning spectrum will discuss the issues at hand with a panel lead debate and Q & A sessions. Attendees will be presented with a Blueprint for Reclaiming the Streets which will set out the plans brought forwards from the WUC18 Task Force. Nick Myall News editor

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Perkins+Will create new ‘landmark’ for Hawaii

Perkins+Will create new ‘landmark’ for Hawaii

The design of this new university building is influenced by the vivid history of its surroundings

Construction on the University of Hawaii’s new Administration and Allied Health Building is nearing completion. Designed by Perkins+Will’s LA Studio in collaboration with Hawaii-based KYA Design Group, the campus building will be a visually dynamic addition to the University of Hawaii West Oahu.  Defined by campus administration as a ‘Landmark Building,’ the architectural design is influenced by the vivid history of the land, informed by the site, and shaped by its function.  Consolidating office space for campus leadership into a single location, while also providing general purpose classrooms and wet/dry teaching laboratories for Microbiology, Cellular / Molecular, Anatomy / Physiology, and Organic Chemistry, the project aspires to create a variety of flexible, engaging workplace and learning environments for students, faculty and staff. Mark Tagawa, associate principal at Perkins+Will’s LA Studio says, “The challenge was how to best consolidate the distinct functions of teaching labs and classrooms within the same building as office space for the campus administration. We wanted to create a facility that interacted with the landscape in a sympathetic way, through water management, landscaping, and materiality. Cultural and ecological appropriateness was our filter for all design decisions.” As the first phase of the campus was influenced by historic sugar mills, the Administration and Allied Health Building is inspired by the additive nature of this building typology’s gable roof form. The building enclosure utilizes CMU (concrete masonry unit) as a monolithic skin with its texture and pattern inspired by traditional Hawaiian kapa (cloth).  “The building serves to greet those entering the campus on one end while also completing the mauka (mountain) side of the great lawn at the other.  While the administration wing acknowledges the ceremonial campus entry, its allied health component points to the commuter entry currently being developed with the new light rail line.” said Tagawa. Located within the Honouliuli ahupuaa (traditional Hawaiian land division), the campus is on former sugar can land with a legacy of over 100 years of agriculture.  Decades of sustained tilling has depleted organic matter in the topsoil decreasing the ability to retain water and support new plant life.  This project seeks to demonstrate the University’s leadership and stewardship for new development in Kapolei. It aspires to restore, heal and rebuild the topsoil through nitrogen fixing planting; to implement onsite ecological water and nutrient management; and to regenerate and revive native landscaping. Acting as sunshading, deep open air lanais (balconies) on the southern facade became a key design feature by connecting both interior and outdoor circulation. The Lanai is a natural gathering space and an extension of the classroom. It is a campus amenity that is physically and visually connected to the Great Lawn.   Tagawa says, “The design of this building through its siting, its form and its engagement with the land was influenced by the ecology and history of its location. It is a site-specific solution that will support and continue the University’s mission of embracing the culture and tradition of Hawaii while fostering excellence in advanced education.” The New Administration & Allied Health Building opens to students in the Spring of 2019. Bonnie Arakawa, Director of Planning and Facilities, UH West O?ahu, said: “As part of our strategic planning efforts, Chancellor Maenette Benham and the UH West O?ahu community have been working toward identifying our future growth strategies, and the Administration & Health Sciences Facility is a key component in strengthening our 21st Century Learning infrastructure and fostering kai?ulu – creating community – both physically and socially. “The Administration & Health Sciences Building is our first major capital improvement project since the Kapolei campus opened in 2012 and it couldn't come any sooner. As the only UH campus posting enrollment increases, coupled with a shortage of space, we are looking forward to the addition of a mix of learning spaces, including classrooms, laboratories, and covered breezeways that extend collaboration and learning outdoors. In addition, the facility will finally provide us with centralized administrative offices, which are currently scattered throughout our 5-building complex. “Positioned strategically at our campus gateway, the building's Administration wing will help to frame and define our mauka plaza with its dramatic 2-story entry portal and lanai, inviting students, staff, and visitors to learn, work, and engage together.” The WAN Education Award 2018 is open for entries  Click here for more details or email wanawards@haymarket.com Nick Myall News editor

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London’s skyline set to be filled with 510 more towers

London’s skyline set to be filled with 510 more towers

Canary Wharf, Docklands and Greenwich Peninsula continue to be the focus for high rise development

London’s skyline is set to be transformed by 510 tall buildings over 20-storeys. Work has already started on 115 towers according to research from New London Architecture (NLA) and GL Hearn. Canary Wharf and the Docklands area continue to be development hotspots as well as Greenwich Peninsula with 40 applications for tall buildings last year. More than 90% (458) of the tall buildings coming forward are residential and could deliver up to 106,000 new homes. Delivering towers has become more challenging with only 18 tall buildings completed in 2017 – a 30% drop from 2016 when 26 were completed. There was also a 25% fall in the number of tall buildings coming out of the ground with work only starting on 40 in 2017. Political and economic uncertainty brought about by the BREXIT vote may have caused this. Peter Murray, Chairman of New London Architecture said: “We continue to see a steady increase in the number of tall buildings coming forward and with London’s population continuing to increase and the demand for new homes only getting higher, our view remains that that well designed tall buildings, in the right place, are part of the solution. “Uncertainties and challenges to deliver these tall buildings remain, which is perhaps why we are seeing a slight slowdown in the in the number of applications, construction starts and completions. However our reports over the past five years show us in the right places, towers allow us to use the finite resource of land very efficiently.” Stuart Baillie, GL Hearn said: “Inner London remains the focus for the majority of tall building but Waltham Forest and Bromley feature in the pipeline for the first time.” The WAN Residential Award 2018 is open for entries  Click here for more details or email wanawards@haymarket.com Nick Myall News editor

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How will we build and live in the future?: Winy Mass of MVRDV

How will we build and live in the future?: Winy Mass of MVRDV

BAU is the world’s leading trade fair for architecture, materials and systems. Here we talk to Winy Mass of MVRDV...

Speaking at BAU 2017 in Munich, Germany, Winy Maas of MVRDV considered… How will we build and live in the future? Why is transparency within processes so important? And how can individualism be combined with increased population densities?  “I have shown what is possible with our new nanotechnology and that we can create a completely changeable environment. This is a great image, but also a terrible image and there should be a debate about it. “Another factor is of course that we have more opportunities to do what we want to with our new societies, which are more mature and more intellectual - particularly the middle classes. Similarly there are more options for bringing a social project together. The third aspect I have illustrated is that we need transparency in our processes in order to integrate criticism and influences in our construction processes, we need to become a transparent society so to speak. I need a methodology and a symbol. I also think the transparent society continues in our interior spaces and our cities in order to reduce claustrophobia. “And of course we ultimately want to carry out projects that we dream of so we can advance our own dreams. This is, essentially, the dreamland project we are also showing. “One of the most important points, not for architects but for urban planners, is to keep city blocks as small as possible and have streets every 20-30 metres. Why? Because this yields a city with 50% porosity. That means that it is not a problem to do what you want. A second aspect. If you get a block then the architect is responsible for it. If there needs to be a space for doing things communally we have many ways of creating public or pseudo-public spaces together with the private sector. I think that is important. This concentration helps us further support the sub topics in this element. Mixed uses, for instance: how we can make a lift shaft with which to reach apartments, but also offices or a supermarket? “Outdoor spaces become an issue too of course. How can we advance the ‘garden feeling’ in a densely populated area to ensure that people don’t want to move to suburbia, how do we make this possible and affordable in our cities? To do that you need large balconies, huge elements but how can I combine individualism with population density? The staggered villages we have developed show this is possible. Vertical villages in Asia where everything is stacked on top of everything else and in the end, these vertical villages become interlinked: then we see individualism combined with density.”   Nick Myall News editor

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‘Neuron Pod’ begins to take shape

‘Neuron Pod’ begins to take shape

The Neuron Pod is a new addition to Centre of the Cell – an award-winning science education centre at Queen Mary University of London’s Whitechapel campus

Construction has begun on ‘Neuron Pod’ - a striking 23-metre long and 10-metre high free-standing structure which will be used as an informal science learning centre at Queen Mary University of London’s Whitechapel campus. The pod is a new addition to Centre of the Cell – an award-winning science education centre helping to inspire local school children to pursue careers in the sciences, and engaging the local community with medical research. Neuron Pod will be constructed from 13 large steel sections, each arriving one by one through the Dartford Crossing. The biggest piece, the ‘axon’, is expected to arrive by police escort towards the end of April, and construction will be completed towards the end of the year. Centre of the Cell’s Director, Professor Fran Balkwill said: “We are all very excited about Neuron Pod – this unique building will allow us to fulfil our potential and offer so much more to our visitors. What’s really important to us is that it increases our ability to interact with the local community. It will be exciting to see how this space evolves and we’re hoping it will become a space where people can let their imaginations run riot.” Since opening in September 2009, over 155,000 people have participated in Centre of the Cell activities. The current embryo-shaped science education centre was the first in the world to be located within working biomedical research laboratories, suspended above the laboratories at Queen Mary’s Blizard Institute. Planned to address demand, Neuron Pod will help increase visitor numbers, and provide a multi-functional space for live science shows, hands-on workshops, experiments, debates, films and exhibitions. The space will also assist in hosting new adult initiatives in the evenings and at weekends, provide activities for Key Stage 4 (age 14 - 16) and sixth form school visits, improve disabled access, and increase the Centre’s ability to develop programmes for young people with learning difficulties. There are also plans to lease the space for community and corporate events. Neuron Pod is designed by leading architect Professor Will Alsop OBE RA, creator of the existing Pod and surrounding Blizard Institute, which has won numerous design awards. Its design is inspired by images of a nerve cell, following on from the four pods inside the building that were inspired by other cells or molecules. Professor Peter McOwan, Queen Mary’s Vice-Principal (Public Engagement and Student Enterprise), said: “We’re incredibly proud of our award winning public engagement activity at Centre of the Cell, and are delighted that construction of a new space to grow our capacity has now begun. “The Neuron Pod will allow us to run new research engagement initiatives aimed at adults, and grow our existing work, helping to create the next generation of scientists and healthcare professionals. Our additional plans to use the Pod for activities beyond bioscience and as a unique venue for public events will further strengthen our work with our local community.” Architect Will Alsop of aLL Design said: “I feel proud to have the opportunity to contribute to this amazing institution. Their work in encouraging young people is extraordinary. I think the new pod will help give young people an even more positive experience.” Funders of the project include the Wellcome Trust, Barts Charity, the Wolfson Foundation, Garfield Weston Foundation, Hobson Charity, Gosling Foundation and Queen Mary University of London. Design and construction also involved Total Construction, Littlehampton Welding and AKT II. Take a virtual tour here... The WAN Awards Civic category is now open for entries  Click here for more details  or email wanawards@haymarket.com Nick Myall News editor

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A blueprint for healthier living

A blueprint for healthier living

The UK-based Design Council has published a report on ‘Healthy Placemaking’ and a film on housing which focus on themes that will be relevant to cities across the globe

The Design Council launched a film in the UK Houses of Parliament on 18.4.18 highlighting the housing challenges faced by young people today in the UK. At the event the Design Council’s report  ‘Healthy placemaking’ was also launched and discussed by UK government officials and other key influencers . The report is focused on healthy placemaking and it examines the barriers identified by people building and designing communities to creating places where people are healthier and happier. The design of buildings, streets, parks and neighbourhoods can support good physical and mental health, help reduce health inequalities and improve people's wellbeing. Conversely, car-oriented environments and hostile public spaces can contribute to sedentary lifestyles and social isolation, increasing people's risk of disease. The need to move away from planning cities around vehicles and encourage people to walk more were two of the  common themes touched on during the speeches made at  the event. The film, ‘Living outside the box’ highlights the challenges faced by young people as they take their first steps to securing a place of their own against a backdrop of the ongoing UK housing crisis. The film, which was commissioned by Design Council and made by Film Roundhouse, considers the challenges faced by its three participants, who were also present at the launch to give their own perspective to an audience of professionals from a variety of different backgrounds. Each tells their own story to highlight the challenges they face, and the ingenious methods they incorporated to overcome what is the most basic need for a person – the need for a safe place of shelter.   Design Council CEO, Sarah Weir OBE gave an introduction to the ‘Healthy placemaking’ report and also spoke about the film saying: “At Design Council, we have been working with Film Roundhouse to explore some of the housing challenges that young people face today. Our film ‘Living outside the box’ follows three young people who take very different approaches to solving their own particular housing challenges. It highlights the lengths young people are going to in order to find themselves the safety and shelter that they, and we all deserve. We hope that through our film, and our healthy placemaking research launched today in Parliament, we will be able to bring about positive change, and influence government to consider the benefits that design brings to the mainstream housing challenges faced by the population each day”. In attendance, and at the launch of the film were members of government including Ed Vaizey MP, Kevin Brennan MP, Heather Wheeler MP (Minister for Housing and Homelessness), Mark Prisk MP, Lisa Nandy MP and Sadie Morgan, Commissioner, National Infrastructure Commission. The attendance from government officials as well as other key influencers demonstrated a real commitment to overcoming and delivering on a need for a safe, comfortable and healthy place for people the live and call home.  “I was delighted to be involved in the making of this film, as the issues raised are at the heart of the discussion today for young and old across the country. How do young people achieve a safe, secure and healthy place to live? These are the questions that drive the discussion, and questions I encounter in my work as a film maker each day” said film maker Ravi Lloyd “I hope that the film will drive further discussion across central government, local government and developers to deliver what is an absolute basic human need. It was clear when making the film that the greatest concerns for the people we spoke to were around the lack of access to the housing ladder, building equity, living in a safe environment and affordability of space”.  The film is available to watch now on the Design Council website, and can be found here  To find out more about the Design Council’s Healthy Placemaking research and to download a PDF of the report please click here. World Architecture News also focuses on creating a cleaner, healthy urban environment. WAN's Reclaiming the Streets initiative is looking at the opportunities presented by the advent of autonomous vehicles and an increasing awareness of the health risks from vehicle pollution.   FULL DETAILS HERE    Nick Myall News editor

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