WAN Awards 2018

THURSDAY 19 APRIL 2018

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Between earth and air...

Lead News

Piuarch 

“agrAir”: is a project from Piuarch at Milan Design Week 2018

As part of the Inhabits program at Milan Design Week 2018, the agrAir project by Piuarch outlines the elements which will hopefully be valued for living in the future - lightness, luminosity, careful use of resources, dissolution of contrasts between interiors and outdoors, between natural and artificial spaces – in a balanced relationship between earth and air. These ideas will also be repeated on the rooftop garden of Piuarch’s office, thus defining a synergic network at Fuorisalone.  Two souls and one name to sum them up in a single gesture: agrAir, the installation presented by Piuarch as part of the Inhabits programme of the Milan Design Week 2018, is indeed all about concreteness of the earth, the most ancient cultivation practices, but also about all those intangible actions which together make up the complexity of living. They are not two opposites forced into a

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IMBE 2018

Rooms with a view

Rooms with a view

The vaulted classrooms of this school are orientated for the best natural light conditions and to frame views the surrounding landscape

Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, Lushan Primary School will be an educational institute for 120 children located 160km north-west of Nanchang, the capital of Jiangxi Province. It will serve 12 local villages with a total population of about 1,800 people. Surrounded by mountains as well as the rivers and lakes fed by the Zhelin Reservoir, the school is within an agricultural region that also has a rich tradition in the production of ceramics. The school’s curriculum is a synthesis of Chinese and international academic systems; combining an education in the creative arts with a comprehensive syllabus of STEM subjects that also includes advanced internet-based learning technologies. Visiting teachers and artists will make the school a focus for the community it serves. The campus includes the school, dormitory and utility buildings within vaulted spaces that connect directly with their rural surroundings. The classrooms have flexible learning arrangements and outdoor teaching areas. Composed as a network of barrel and parabolic vaults that open towards the river, the vaults stretch and intersect to accommodate the  school’s varied programme. A long central courtyard acts as the school’s main circulation space and play area. The vaulted classrooms are orientated for the best natural light conditions, as well as to frame views to the surrounding landscape. Cantilevers protect the classrooms from the solar gain of Jiangxi’s sub-tropical climate and extend the teaching spaces into the landscape to provide a varied and interactive learning environment. The barrel and parabolic vaults act as the school’s primary structure and enclosure, with each vault performing as an individual structural element. To minimise construction time and also reduce the number of separate building elements required to be transported to the school’s remote location, ZHA proposes to combine the local skills of in-situ concrete construction with new advancements in hot-wire cut foam formwork that can be prepared on site by an industrial robot to create the barrel and parabolic shaped moulds. The modularity of the vaults enables moulds to be used multiple times, further accelerating the construction process and reducing costs. The region’s long history of producing the highest quality ceramics dates from the Ming Dynasty. These traditions are continued in the school’s ceramic external finishes laid in a gradient of tones that express the differing programmes within. Located on a small peninsula surrounded on three sides by water and bordering farmland to the north, the school is on an elevated escarpment five metres above the 50-year flood level. Its surrounding landscape incorporates outdoor teaching spaces and sports facilities, and also serves as a natural water catchment area to further protect the school from flooding. This surrounding landscape rises towards the school, creating natural areas within its raised courtyards. Nick Myall News editor

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Schmidt Hammer Lassen strengthens leadership

Schmidt Hammer Lassen strengthens leadership

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects doubles its partner group with the appointment of seven new partners

With an eye toward future development and growth, acclaimed Danish architectural firm Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects strengthens its leadership group with the appointment of seven new partners. Trine Berthold, Bente Damgaard, Kasper Frandsen, Mads Kaltoft, Rasmus Kierkegaard, Tiago Pereira, and Nathan Smith join founding partners Bjarne Hammer, John Lassen, and Morten Schmidt, along with Kim Holst Jensen, Kristian Lars Ahlmark, Chris Hardie, and Rong Lu to form a robust new partner group. The announcement comes three months after Schmidt Hammer Lassen joined international architecture and design firm Perkins+Will in a strategic partnership that expands Schmidt Hammer Lassen's geographic reach, and adds world-class design research, advanced digital technology, and an even broader base of interdisciplinary talent to its arsenal of global resources. "When Morten, John, and I established the firm 32 years ago, our vision was to create an internationally-recognized architectural studio known for high design with a strong Scandinavian ideology," says Bjarne Hammer. "We realized that vision with the help of an extraordinary group of architects and professionals, many of whom are now poised to lead the firm into the next generation. Now that we are part of Perkins+Will, we can aptly recognize their achievements, while also giving them new tools and resources needed to take the company to even greater heights." A diverse blend of world-class talent Schmidt Hammer Lassen's seven new partners bring a vast array of experiences and expertise to the firm's leadership group. Trine Berthold, whose career at Schmidt Hammer Lassen began in 2003, has been a key figure in the development of some of the studio's most significant competition wins for cultural and civic projects, including Dokk1, the 35,600-square-metre public library that is Scandinavia's largest, and represents a new generation of modern hybrid libraries. Berthold is known for her use of drawings as a tool for communication and development of architecture, and is active in guiding the next generation of architects. The Aarhus School of Architecture appointed her Vice Dean with a special focus on international partnerships, a position she held from 2014 to 2017. Bente Damgaard joined Schmidt Hammer Lassen in 2004 as Chief Financial Officer, and was promoted to Chief Executive Officer the following year. In her new role as Partner and Managing Director, she will continue to oversee the business performance and strategic development of the practice. Her primary task is to maintain the firm's position as one of Scandinavia's leading international architectural studios, while managing a smooth integration with Perkins+Will where she is a member of both the Managing Director Group and the European Strategy Committee. Kasper Frandsen is a talented, ambitious architect whose high design skills cultivated over his 18-year career at Schmidt Hammer Lassen is matched by his keen ability to inspire and guide the next generation of architects. As a generalist, Kasper has been instrumental in both the development of the firm's healthcare portfolio and in the competition phase of a variety of projects domestically and abroad. He currently oversees the development of an all-timber office building extension in central Denmark, and the University of Bristol Library, an £80 million library development in southwest England. Kasper injects his strong belief in the human-centric approach at the heart of the practice's Scandinavian design principles into each of his projects. Mads Kaltoft is an experienced architect with a wide range of skills that span from conceptual design to fine details in construction work. The strength of his professional skills lies in his unwavering dedication to his trade paired with a holistic approach to architectural design. Since joining Schmidt Hammer Lassen in 2001, he has developed a distinct management style that combines creative dexterity with strategic ingenuity, and has led teams on projects located across Scandinavia and greater Europe. In a nod to his leadership, Mads was a lecturer at The Royal Academy of Fine Arts' School of Architecture from 1998 to 2005. Rasmus Kierkegaard has spent the last decade leading Schmidt Hammer Lassen's Concept Development department in Aarhus. He has a rich, diverse portfolio that includes the strategic conceptual development of complex cultural projects such as Vendsyssel Theatre, Denmark's first newly built theatre in over a century outside of Copenhagen. Rasmus has worked with projects in a variety of cultural and geographical settings and has been heavily involved in architectural competitions of all types-from initial idea, to an expanded concept, and all the way to a final design. Quality, sustainability, and creative approach are the hallmarks of his work. Tiago Pereira brought his international experience working in Holland, Portugal and Spain to Schmidt Hammer Lassen in 2006 and has since led the Concept Development department in Copenhagen. During his tenure, he has been responsible for the design of key projects such as Malmö Live, a 54,000-square-metre concert hall, conference centre and 400-room hotel complex in southern Sweden, and an 85,000-square-metre mixed-use complex in Boston, USA. Tiago was a visiting professor in the Architectural Engineering department at the Danish Technical University, and lectures regularly at international conferences, seminars and architectural events. Nathan Smith, Schmidt Hammer Lassen's Chief Commercial Officer responsible for the firm's global business development operation, joined the company in 2015 and, in the short time since then, has led the firm to new international markets including Australia and the United States. Nathan brings his dynamic leadership style to the firm's executive board, where he sets international strategy. Educated in industrial design, Nathan has forged a career within business development and marketing for companies such as Bjarke Ingels Group, AECOM, EDAW and Reuters for more than 15 years. Schmidt Hammer Lassen also promoted five architects to associate partner roles. They are Nuno Cruz, a project architect on the Monroe Blocks project in Detroit; Mads Engel, project development manager and director of the firm's Copenhagen office; Masahiro Katsume, a seasoned architect with more than 35 years of global experience; René Nedergaard, design lead on projects in the U.S. and across Scandinavia; and Elif Tinaztepe, a recognized global leader in library design. All new partner and associate partner appointments were effective 1 April 2018.

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Following the Plot in Beirut

Following the Plot in Beirut

This new development on the outskirts of Beirut adds to the recent wave of striking projects in and around the city

Plot # 1282 is a residential project located on the northern periphery of Beirut in the proximity of one of the city’s abandoned and unused railway terminals, military barracks, leftovers of agricultural land and a 30m wide highway. The zone in which the project is located is not presently considered residential and the program consists of 95 industrial lofts with surfaces ranging from 100 sq m to 650 sq m on a total built?up area of 25,800 sq m. The floor slabs are organized around nine exposed cores, each core feeding a maximum of two apartments per floor. The proposed lofts feature high ceilings of 5.3m with open space plans and minimal interior partitioning. With a surface area of 5,400 sq m, the site perimeter is of 430m of which less than 12m are facing a public access road. This implies that 97% of the site’s periphery faces parcels on which buildings could be erected at some point in the future. In its present state, the site enjoys unobstructed panoramic views on all orientations along the totality of the plot’s perimeter. As a result, all proposed loft spaces benefit from full exposure to the exterior through floor-to-ceiling glazing on all elevations. In an unforeseeable future, as the surrounding plots are constructed and with the gradual densification of the immediate environment, the extensive permeability of the building’s facades will face unpredictable situations. The project’s morphology, with its continuous setback along the totality of the perimeter, as well as its gradually diminishing floor plates foreshadows and responds to this potential condition. The implemented gesture guarantees generous breathing corridors along the site’s entire periphery, for our scheme as well as the future surrounding buildings in question. In many sectors along the periphery of Beirut, relatively high exploitation factors are applied on zones that are still undeveloped. In the absence of a master plan, the rapid gentrification of these sectors has led to catastrophic urban conditions. In most cases, the general guidelines of the very complex and archaic municipal building laws are the only leading rules and references on which developers build their schemes. In such situations, it is becoming increasingly difficult to define the integration of a project and its relationship on the long term with neighboring sites. The architect’s project does not only celebrate the present state of its environment, the absence of buildings and the scarceness of the urban fabric on which it sits, it also anticipates the future expansion of its surroundings and its rapport with the unpredictable conditions that will be implied by the development of the sector.

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IN BRIEF

LIAM FOX LAUNCHES AWARDS FOR BEST BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS OF THE FUTURE

International Trade Secretary, Dr Liam Fox MP, today launched the GREA

NBBJ London office announces strategic leadership additions

NBBJ, an international architecture firm celebrating its diamond anniv

Casey Jones joins Perkins+Will

Global architecture and design firm Perkins+Will has announced that Ca

EVENTS

10.05.2018 

National Planning Summit 
This year’s National Planning Summit is the must-attend forum for planning  

07.06.2018 

The LA Design Festival 
The LA Design Festival honors our city’s rich design culture and celebrates 

29.06.2018 

Immersive Technology in the Built Environment 
Immersive Technology in the Built Environment is a brand new conference loo 

Qatar National Library opens its doors

Qatar National Library opens its doors

The QNL by OMA includes the National Library, a Public Library and a University Library

The Qatar National Library (QNL) in Doha, designed by OMA, was officially opened on April 16 by the Emir of Qatar, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al Thani, Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser, and the CEO of the Qatar Foundation, Sheikha Hind bint Hamad al Thani, in the presence of multiple heads of state from the region and beyond. QNL encompasses the National Library, the Public Library, the University Library, and the Heritage Collection, which consists of valuable texts and manuscripts related to the Arab-Islamic civilization. The public library houses over a million books and space for thousands of readers over an area of 42,000 sq m. The National Library is part of the Education City, a new academic campus which hosts satellite campuses from leading universities and institutions from around the world. Other OMA designed buildings on the new campus include the Qatar Foundation Headquarters and a new branch for the Research Institute. The library is conceived as a single room which houses both people and books. The edges of the building are lifted from the ground creating three aisles which accommodate the book collection and, at the same time, enclose a central triangular space. This configuration also allows the visitor to access the building at its center, rather than laboriously entering from the perimeter. The aisles are designed as a topography of shelving, interspersed with spaces for reading, socializing and browsing. The bookshelves are meant to be part of the building both in terms of materiality – they are made of the same white marble as the floors – and infrastructure – they incorporate artificial lighting, ventilation, and the book return system. The heritage collection is placed at the center of the library in a six-meter-deep excavated-like space, cladded in beige travertine. The collection can also operate autonomously, directly accessible from the outside. Commenting on the project Ellen van Loon of OMA said: “Classically, libraries were vibrant spaces for the exchange of knowledge. With the immediate accessibility of information in the current era, the library’s role as public meeting space is more significant than ever. We pay tribute to the region’s rich culture with the Heritage Library, excavated from the ground like an archeological site, holding historical and priceless Islamic texts for visitors to study and contemplate.” Rem Koolhaas went on to say: “We designed the space so you can see all the books in a panorama. You emerge immediately surrounded by literally every book – all physically present, visible, and accessible, without any particular effort. The interior is so large it’s on an almost urban scale: it could contain an entire population, and also an entire population of books.” Iyad Alsaka added: “The library is a testimony to Qatar’s significant regional role and influence in bridging knowledge, tolerance and greater dialogue within the region and to a global reach. QNL is an extraordinary public space in the region that will promote knowledge sharing, physically and digitally.” Qatar National library is the latest expression of OMA’s long-term interest in the library, which goes back to the competition for the National Library of France in 1989. Following the Seattle Central Library in the US and the Bibliothèque Alexis de Tocqueville in Caen, France, this is the third library built by OMA. The project was led by Rem Koolhaas, Ellen van Loon, Iyad Alsaka, Vincent Kersten and Gary Owen. Nick Myall News editor

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At one with the landscape

At one with the landscape

Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter are bringing cutting edge architecture, design, spa facilities and food culture to Breitenbach in France

Designed by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter, Breitenbach Landscape Hotel will have a prominent role linking the hotel activity to the site and local traditions. At the same time, it will gather the best of architecture, design, spa facilities and food culture in the region. It will connect the local character and landscape with new characteristic forms and create a specific architectural expression. The hotel will offer an unusual, comfortable experience in the middle of the French countryside and will answer to the visitors’ desire for quality.  Located on a French hillside surrounded by nature, the project will blend within the landscape. Rooms are organized in separated Norwegian inspired cabins and offer luxury and privacy to the customers. They will be designed as comfortable units with stunning views to the valley and will have a material palette referring to the Nordic temperament. Natural and light materials will be used, mainly new and recycled wood with a combination of large glass opening.  A combination of different amenities will create an exclusive experience of the Breitenbach landscape hotel. The Restaurant and Spa in the main building will be private features for the customers but will be a part of the open scenery towards the landscape. Customers will have an opportunity to go through the culinary experiences related to the region and the landscape in connection to both tradition and innovation. Breitenbach landscape hotel will also look at art and culture as a part of strategy to enhance the region cultural practices. Visitors will have the possibility to take part of the local culture and art through some areas dedicated to exhibition and local knowledge. Nick Myall News editor

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Architecture with a cutting edge

Architecture with a cutting edge

This social housing project in Paris echoes the building traditions of the city’s past

The Parisian practice Barrault Pressacco recently completed a social housing project in stone. The operation articulates an environmental approach to design whilst echoing the Hausmannian building tradition that characterises the French capital. The use of this natural material equally contributes to the sense of wellbeing and comfort that permeate the project. The site is located in the 11th arrondissement of Paris, where local vernacular architecture coexists alongside Hausmannian renovations from the latter half of the 19th century.  The volumetry of the building derives from urban regulations and the orientation of the site. The densest part of the building is aligned with the street whereas the second part, situated inside the block, is disposed in south-facing graded terrasses. Stone : from material to ressource  Stone is abundant in France and notably in the vicinity of Paris. Its use is virtuous environmentally and highly contextual, drawing on local resources and engaging the regional economy. Territory, city and architecture are thus brought together by this ancestral material.  The energy necessary to extract, cut and lay stone is limited in comparison to other materials. It undergoes little transformation and its intrinsic properties are conserved in the process. Having been a geological layer, stone becomes a resource, imbued with new purpose and meaning.  Structure / Hybridation The construction of the building is hybrid, composed of different materials each assuming a particular mechanical or thermal role. All the facades are in massive stone supported by reinforced concrete porticos on the ground floor. This juxtaposition recalls the parisian building tradition, wherein the materiality of the lower and higher levels was typically differentiated.  The thickness of the stone facade varies depending on the degree of its sollication, with 35 centimeters on the first level and 30 centimeters on the floors above. A metal frame associated with the facade reduces the load on the floor plates.  Hemp concrete, whose breathability is well suited for stone masonry, insulates the building.  Stereotomy and modenature The science of stereotomy (art of cutting and assembling stone elements) leverages the significant technical advances associated with the building of cathedrals. For the project architects, an awareness of the life cycle of stone  - extraction, transformation, use, reuse - gives new relevance to the architectural form and to construction details.  As opposed to ornamentation by addition, the design of the window openings proceeds by subtraction, inspired by the Haussmannian pursuit of an economy of means and materials. The modernature hereby invokes history in order to innovate.  Nick Myall News editor

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Hawkins\Brown get the go-ahead in Wakefield

Hawkins\Brown get the go-ahead in Wakefield

Hawkins\Brown wins planning for Rutland Mills arts masterplan in Wakefield

An Arts-led regeneration of Grade II Listed textile mills in Wakefield, UK will deliver a 130,000 sq ft development that will include studio space for artists, designers and musicians; digital and tech industries; artisan craft and makers; studios and commercial space; retail; restaurants; event and gallery space, education and a hotel. HawkinsBrown has won detailed planning and listed building consent for the 130,000 sq ft masterplan to regenerate a complex of grade II listed Victorian Mill Buildings on the River Calder in Wakefield on behalf of City & Provincial Properties Investments Ltd. Sited next to the world-renowned Hepworth Wakefield Gallery, Rutland Mills will form a critical new phase in the Wakefield Waterfront masterplan, bringing new coherence to the area and contributing to and expanding on the creative, art and cultural programme currently led by the Hepworth. Katie Tonkinson, Director of HawkinsBrown’s Manchester Studio, said: “Our vision for Rutland Mills is for a rich mixed-use, inclusive, creative and cultural cluster. The rich and diverse offering at Rutland Mills will entice visitors already following the Yorkshire Sculpture Triangle to prolong their stay in Wakefield, while providing a new and exciting destination for the local community. Rutland Mills will form a critical next phase in the Wakefield Waterfront masterplan, contributing to and expanding on the creative, arts and culture programme currently generated by The Hepworth Wakefield.” HawkinsBrown was appointed in December 2015 to develop designs that aim to regenerate the historic Rutland Mills complex into an arts-led mixed-use development that will build-upon the Wakefield’s emerging international reputation as a center for culture and creativity. The approved design repairs and repurposes a complex of mills that has lain derelict for almost 20 years.  HawkinsBrown will undertake extensive remedial work on the Grade II listed buildings, with new interventions such as external towers for lifts and circulation touching lightly upon the historic fabric. The shape of the mills’ 34m high chimney, which was demolished in 1982 will be recreated by a steel lattice structure that will be internally lit at night to create a recognisable beacon for the complex.  A total of 32,000 sq ft of space will be created in new buildings built in brick alongside the historic mill buildings.  The vision for the complex is for a rich mix of uses that includes studio space for artists, designers and musicians; workspace for the digital and tech industries; artisan craft and makers; commercial space; retail; restaurant and hotel offers; event and gallery space and education. The masterplan will also deliver significant new public realm, including a central courtyard event space, gateways, and a new route to the River Calder.  A new riverside pier and increased permeability through the site will better connect the riverfront back to the neighbouring districts to the south.  The WAN Future Projects Commercial Award 2018 is open for entries  Click here for more details or email wanawards@haymarket.com Nick Myall News editor

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Pure and simple

Pure and simple

The village of Ptuj in Slovenia has a new focal point fashioned from clean white concrete

Skorba is a small village in the vicinity of Ptuj, Slovenia's oldest town. Once a typical village with a clustered settlement pattern, the passage of years and the proximity of the city caused it to grow out of turn, transforming it into a commuter suburb without a clear structure. The organic growth resulted in a markedly heterogeneous development organised along the access roads, with no public surface layout and without a clearly legible village centre. Consequently, the first consideration following the decision to erect a village chapel was how to use this opportunity to also lay out a central event and socialising space for the villagers. The site for the new village centre was carefully chosen: the plot once contained the village stream source, and this is also the point where the one river terrace bank rises upwards to the other one. The village centre is sited close to the community centre building, at the crossroads of the main paths through the village. In discussing the new village centre Skorba, it is remarkable that the entire project, from the initial idea to completion, was driven by the initiative of the inhabitants themselves. They took an active part in raising the funds to purchase the plot as well as in the construction, which required many hours of voluntary work by the villagers. All of this had to be taken into account when drafting the project. Therefore, the design does not hinge upon the perfection of every detail and does not feature any high-tech solutions. Instead, it aims to establish an appropriate relationship with its surroundings and a sufficiently bold appearance chiefly by means of a clearly legible volumetric design and simple materiality. The first step in defining the space is the siting of the triangular surface of the new square in the centre of the vacant plot. The paved surface, clearly separate from the grassy surroundings, defines the future socialising space. The surface then employs a narrow access path to connect to the road passing by. The central part, created by the section of the geometries of both paved surfaces, is given a slight dip, which shelters the event space from the impacts of the surroundings and directs all users' gazes towards the centre. Next, the volumes of the chapel and the grandstands are raised to create an introverted village square. The final device in designing the new village square is the truncation of the raised volumes by means of a uniform plane which creates an impression of a virtual roof and completes the structure's form. The entire structure is made of a uniform material - white concrete. The combination of simple materiality and emphasised volumes creates an attractive spatial element, its appearance sufficiently bold to drown the heterogeneous structure of the surroundings and mark the significance of the area. The WAN Awards Civic category is now open for entries  Click here for more details  or email wanawards@haymarket.com Nick Myall News editor

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Building up a head of steam

Building up a head of steam

This adaptive reuse project has taken a former boiler house and converted it into a multi-functional leasable area for cultural, corporate and social events

From the Architects: This former boiler house was established in 1872 by the Prague Association of Ironworks near the Prague – Dresden railway line by the Vltava River in the Czech Republic. It has recently been the subject of an extensive renovation by Atelier Hoffman. It significantly influenced the development of the nearby municipalities and has left a considerable mark on this locality, giving it a unique character and ambience. In the past, more than 1600 people lived and worked here; nowadays it is less than a hundred, even though there is almost everything here: housing, railway, technical infrastructure, a river and mature trees. The boiler house stands next to the already renovated Coal-Grinding Mill to which it was connected for operational reasons. It represents another important project of the gradual regeneration of the entire estate. The buildings in question are among the oldest parts of the estate and help to create its genius loci. That is why we made the decision to treat the project with respect and consideration, to preserve the buildings and avoid any significant changes, even though it is no longer possible to give them back their original functions. Our objective was to find a new use for them and, at the same time, preserve the quality of the existing architecture and urbanism and honour the fact that we are in the middle of an industrial estate with a near 150-year tradition. The project concerns two, interconnected buildings. The construction of the older northern part of the boiler house with wooden trusses dates back to around 1880. In 1921, following an increase in production, a newer boiler house with basement and metal roof framework was added to it. In the same year a water tank was build onto the chimney which works to this day. After 1991 the buildings were used as a warehouse and a garage for electric platform trucks. In 2002 they stopped being used altogether and fell into disrepair. We did not make any substantial changes to the spatial arrangement and urbanism of the place. There was landscaping carried out, part of which were the newly built paved roads followed by planting trees and lawns. Between the Coal-Grinding Mill and the Boiler House a pedestrian street was built leading from the main estate road towards the river. Our objective was to preserve the building, rid it of all unsuitable alterations carried out in the past and give it back its original industrial character so that its historic function remains visible even after the renovation.  The architects also wanted to streamline the layout and adapt the building to serve its new function. The basic shape of the house, its tectonics and volume remained largely unchanged. The brick cladding was restored using original bricks. The architectural design, the layout and the technical solution were created with regard to the required flexibility of use, a long-term sustainability of the building, and also with a view to the fact that the estate was hit by a flood in 2002. At the very beginning, the architects defined the future use of the building as multifunctional showroom for cultural, corporate and social events with an ambition to become the heart of the future arts & culture district existing in a symbiotic relationship with traditional crafts and technological innovations. The multifunctional hall is situated in the southern part of the Boiler House. The northern part of the Boiler House has been rebuilt to become a regular restaurant; however, it is currently used mostly for catering during events. The basement provides other facilities with a possibility of having a peak into the formerly inaccessible smoke flues and the chimney itself. For the next phase we are planning on integrating the railway siding into the estate’s transport system and using the existing pipeline bridge as a scenic route for walkers connecting the renovated parts with the yet undeveloped area in the northern corner of the brownfield. The WAN Awards Civic category is now open for entries  Click here for more details  or email wanawards@haymarket.com

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