WAN Awards 2018

SUNDAY 24 JUNE 2018

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UK architecture firms concerned over BREXIT

Lead News

 

As the UK’s exit from the European Union approaches several UK-based architecture firms are expressing their concerns

As the European Union (Withdrawal Bill) was voted through the UK House of Commons on 20 June, UK Prime Minister Theresa May said; "Today has been an important step in delivering the Brexit people voted for, a Brexit that gives Britain a brighter future, a Britain in control of its money, laws and borders." However, the UK’s approaching exit from the EU has created uncertainty amongst many architecture firms based in the UK with several identifying it is a major concern, particularly when it comes to attracting and retaining staff from outside the UK. The UK’s largest practice, Foster + Partners, has said it would even consider relocating its London HQ if Brexit meant it could no longer attract the world’s best architects. The firm has been actively lobbying the UK government behind the scenes on Brexit ever since the UK population voted to leave the EU. Foster +

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Benoy wins in China

Benoy wins in China

Benoy has won the international competition to design INCITY MEGA for SCPG in Wenzhou, China

Following Benoy’s earlier appointment to complete the masterplan for eight land plots along the Central Green Axis of Wenzhou for China Vanke, this latest competition will see the firm deliver the architecture for two key waterfront plots within the central masterplan for Wenzhou, China.  The 250,000m2 Wenzhou INCITY MEGA will be the first commercial complex in SCPG’s new ‘MEGA’ product line. The announcement along with Benoy’s winning design was unveiled to the public by SCPG’s Hangzhou City Commercial Company at a press conference in June. Both plots for Wenzhou INCITY MEGA are both located on the eastern side of the Central Green Axis. Plot D29 will be the site of the INCITY MEGA Mall while Plot D31, longer and more narrow, will form the future waterfront boutique district. The vision for the project is to deliver a ‘three-dimensional urban space’; an interconnected destination which blurs the boundaries between commercial and public realms. “We saw the opportunity for both plots to become an extension of the Green Axis Park for Wenzhou”, said Qin Pang, Director and Head of Shanghai Studio for Benoy. “With the unique benefit of being on the waterfront, we wanted to open up the spaces and make the most of this environment alongside the commercial offerings of the development.” For the design of the INCITY MEGA Mall, Benoy pushed the external boundaries of the development outwards to create an impressive, multi-functional inner courtyard and open-space at the heart of the retail-led scheme. The multi-level development has been injected with open-air platforms overlooking the central courtyard, while the waterfront facing edge features a large promenade and multiple landscaped viewing decks. The waterfront boutique district on Plot D31 seamlessly connects to the INCITY MEGA Mall and brings a commercial offering to the mixed-use development. Three prominent glass structures sit above the scheme and will offer innovative commercial office spaces for business headquarters. Below, the continued network of retail, dining and leisure attractions will form the lower floors of the development. Throughout the mixed-use scheme, the connection to the waterfront is central to the design. Enhancing accessibility and creating interesting pedestrian networks throughout has part of the design strategy. Commercially, large block structures have been interwoven throughout the development to provide attractive anchor spaces for tenants. Large-scale venues such as movie theatres, outdoor plazas and an ice-rink as well as a gym and swimming pool create strong leisure attractions and venues for a changing calendar of events.  “What visitors will notice across the entire development is the connectivity to the waterfront and outdoors – not just on the ground floor, but as they rise through the development. The network of platforms, outdoor walkways, open-air bazaars and landscaped decks help create a unique environment which blends the water and landscape with the retail mall and commercial business space to create a truly first-of-its-kind destination in Wenzhou,” continued Qin. Essentially, Benoy’s design has aimed to meet the demands of a growing Wenzhou population and a new generation of consumer. Traditional offers such as office space and retail have been enlivened through a design which injects open-air plazas, terraces, landscaped decks, plazas, sports venues, theatres and public realm throughout. With a joint commitment from the government and the developers, Wenzhou INCITY MEGA will provide a strong benchmark for waterfront development in the city and a future jewel along the Central Green Axis.   Nick Myall News editor

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Architects combine on Wickside

Architects combine on Wickside

A ‘new piece of London’ is being created in Hackney Wick

BUJ Architects & Ash Sakula Architects have announced that their Wickside project in London has received planning permission from the LLDC last night. Wickside, one of the largest development sites in Hackney Wick, will provide 475 homes and 300 jobs on a former waste transfer site, creating a permeable, mixed use neighbourhood comprising differently sized urban blocks set around ordinary London streets. Each block is made up of a variety of individually scaled buildings creating a complex and diverse townscape. Rooftops are extensively greened, and provide opportunities to grow and play for residents. Wickside is an ‘‘outstanding’’ mixed use development, that aims to enhance and support an existing creative community through the retention and regeneration of a number of existing on-site heritage assets, supported by residential accommodation, an industrial working yard, a craft brewery, casting foundry, food quarter and art gallery, all set alongside a new linear, south facing, canalside park. Existing buildings form pavilions, restaurants, an art gallery and café, all enhancing the extensive new public realm. At the east end of the site, the LLDC’s new north-south route and canal bridge for pedestrians and cyclists linking the new Hackney Wick Station and Fish Island is carefully knitted into the urban realm. Piers Gough, sitting on the LLDC planning committee described the scheme as handsome, elegant, quirky, delightful and beautifully handled. He was amazed by its quality and described its liveability as “the best we’ve ever seen”. Robert Sakula, Founding Partner at Ash Sakula Architects said, “We’re delighted that the project can now move forward and play its part in the regeneration of Hackney Wick. We’ve aimed to create a proper piece of city, closely integrated with the different characteristics of its surroundings, so that Wickside becomes not just one place but many places.” Frank Green, Founding Partner at BUJ Architects LLP said, “I’m really proud to be instrumental in the vision and Masterplanning of this ‘’outstanding’’ new piece of London.“ Guy Forrester, Founding Partner at BUJ Architects LLP said, “Eight years in the cooking we now look forward to the next phase, delivering a new piece of London to live, work & play in.“ Nick Myall News editor

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A Fruitful Endeavor

A Fruitful Endeavor

Fed by the client’s desire to create the best Pinot Noir and Riesling gravity-fed winery in the world, Olson Kundig have created Martin’s Lane Winery in Canada

Tucked into a hillside in Kelowna, British Columbia, Olson Kundig’s design of the newest von Mandl Family Estates winery draws a close parallel between the topography of the land and the gravity-flow winemaking process taking place inside. Conceived of as a simple rectangular form with a central split or “fracture” down the middle, the production side of the building follows the direction of the site, utilizing the downhill slope for its gravity-flow process. The other half containing the visitor area cantilevers out over the vineyards, offering sweeping views of nearby Okanagan Lake and the iconic belltower of Mission Hill Winery, von Mandl’s first winery in the region, also designed by architect Tom Kundig. 2The functional areas of Martin’s Lane step down the hillside, from the grape-receiving area at the top, through fermentation and the settling room, down to the bottling room on the above ground level, and finally the below-ground barrel storage area. Throughout its 34,800 square feet, the winery’s office, wine lab and visitor spaces are woven into the manufacturing areas, including a tasting room, dining room, and visitor walkways that offer intimate glimpses of the production process. The design’s central “fracture” allows for an expansive line of clerestory windows here, increasing natural daylight intake into the production areas, as well as opening impressive views of the surrounding vineyards and natural landscape. The building’s exterior is cladded with obsidian-painted structural steel, while rusted corrugated steel is used for siding and roof overhangs. Siding panels are tilted downhill to visually underscore the story of the gravity-flow process. Guided tours bring visitors into the facility through a rough formed concrete tunnel and then to a private tasting room accented by a glass and perforated-steel wall that overlooks the barrel storage area. A custom-designed and fabricated spiral steel staircase leads up to a larger tasting room and visitor experience area with perforated steel on the outside and solid steel inside. The form of the staircase was inspired by the stainless steel filtering equipment used in the wine industry, as well as by the Fibonacci sequence that reflects how grapevines propagate. Much like the building itself, interior details tell the story of the meticulous winemaking process that VMF Estates has worked for generations to refine. Commenting on the project Tom Kundig, Design Principal at Olson Kundig said: “We were honoured to be involved in this project because it’s the family’s desire that this be the best Pinot Noir and Riesling gravity-fed winery in the world. They are working to put Canada on the world map in terms of winemaking, and they wanted a building that matched that agenda.”  Tom went on to say, “The idea of the building is to embrace both the landscape and the nature of gravity-fed wineries. Because it’s on a hillside, it was an ideal location amongst the vineyards of the area. The building falls along the topography of the land where the production happens, while the hospitality portion of the program cantilevers out over the landscape, opening the space to the lake, the vineyards, and the mountains beyond.” Commenting on the Winery’s layout Tom said: “The building is split into two parts, with one part literally following the land, and the other part following the horizon line. My favorite element of the project is the magic that happens when these two parts of the building come together. mThis building respects the delicate nature of the winemaking process. Not only that, but it makes logical sense how the building fits into the landscape – the hospitality portion is up above, cantilevering over the land, while the quiet, dark, humid part of the building is the wine cellar below.”  Martin’s Lane Winery has won several awards including: The 2016 AIA Seattle Honor Awards, Honor Award, the 2017 AIA Northwest and Pacific Region Honor Awards, Citation Award and the 2017 Chicago Athenaeum, American Architecture Awards. Nick Myall News editor

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IN BRIEF

Frank McGoldrick to lead Aedas’ operations in Europe

Aedas is pleased to announce that Global Design Principal Frank McGold

Right to Build Task Force announces five free days of support for organisations working to deliver new community-led housing

The Right to Build Task Force is offering five organisations up to fiv

Darling Associates expands northwards with the acquisition of specialist practice Architect-CT

Darling Associates, the multi award winning architectural studio, cele

EVENTS

26.05.2018 

Collateral event of 16th International Architecture Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia 
La Biennale di Venezia - Hong Kong Exhibition 6 May – 25 November, 2018 

29.06.2018 

Immersive Technology in the Built Environment 
Immersive Technology in the Built Environment is a brand new conference loo 

Zaha Hadid Architects get the greenlight in Russia

Zaha Hadid Architects get the greenlight in Russia

The 262,000 square metre Sberbank Technopark is set to become a cradle of IT innovation

Sberbank Technopark at the Skolkovo Innovation Centre in Moscow has been awarded planning permission, receiving the ‘State Expertise’ certification from the city’s planning authority for its innovative design that includes large communal spaces, atria and cantilevered facades. Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, enabling works have now begun on the Sberbank Technopark site, with shortlisted contractors soon to be invited to tender for the project’s construction. Established in 1841, Sberbank is the market leader of the Russian banking and economic circulatory system. At the forefront of process innovations and social responsibility, over 70% of Russia’s population rely on Sberbank’s services. The 262,000 square metre Sberbank Technopark will become the bank's cradle of IT innovations, accommodating 17,000 people working in Sberbank’s information technology and marketing departments. “These are the people who will be responsible for all the bank’s ‘substance’ – its technical content, its brains,” explains Sberbank President German Gref. Home to the bank’s divisions that develop, implement and ensure the operation of process solutions and breakthrough technologies, Sberbank Technopark’s design evolved from detailed analysis of the varied work processes and arrangements within the bank’s technology and marketing departments. Technopark's design will encourage teams to collaborate and pilot innovations that deliver inventive, high-quality solutions and applications. Christos Passas, project director at Zaha Hadid Architects, said: “We are delighted to have received planning permission for this ambitious project. "The necessity to innovate and collaborate within the workplace environment is fundamental to Sberbank’s operations," continued Passas. "Technopark’s design reconfigures working relationships by adopting a holistic approach to create an inter-connected, multi-functional workplace ecology driven by the bank’s requirements for enhanced communication, interaction and diversification that promotes creativity and engagement.” Considered to be Russia’s Silicon Valley, Skolkovo is Moscow's new centre for the laboratories and campuses of Russia’s fast developing IT, biomedical, energy, nuclear and space innovations. Nick Myall News editor

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Kensington sparks into life...

Kensington sparks into life...

A unique and characterful mixed use building has been created by SPPARC at the heart of the Kensington Conservation Area in London

SPPARC has completed 145 Kensington Church Street, a 17,000 sq. ft mixed use development in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Featuring three floors of office space occupied by Savills, and four luxury residential apartments, this building draws its design inspiration from the unique candle-making heritage of the area. With this new signature building for joint developer Savills Investment Management and Unbranded Properties, SPPARC has bound together the old and the new and deftly navigated the tight constraints of a sensitive conservation area to create a unique and characterful building. Praised by planners as a cohesive addition to the townscape, SPPARC worked closely with the local authority to gain planning approval and to produce an exceptional mixed-use development with a dynamic façade, that compliments the character of the Conservation Area whilst being unapologetic about its modernity. Through a carefully crafted design that reflects on the traditional building hierarchy of the surrounding conservation area, SPPARC was able to successfully integrate a larger scaled building onto this prominent site. The residential apartments that occupy the second to fifth floors feature floor-to-ceiling openable windows and interiors finished with white-washed oak. A terrace situated on the rooftop serves one of the two lateral apartments, whilst the two duplex apartments are served by balcony spaces. The office space which fronts directly onto Kensington Church Street is served with bike storage and shower facilities at the basement level. The scheme design has been informed by the candle making heritage of this part of Kensington with the main façade resembling the candle creation process in which wax was heated in a dipping container. The specially developed precast panels contain a quartz aggregate that gives a shimmering effect to the façade. Trevor Morriss, Principal at SPPARC, said: 'we are delighted to have completed this prominent contemporary building within the heart of the Kensington Conservation Area.  The scheme balances matters of scale, material quality and functionality to achieve a building which has distinctive architecture whilst sensitively cohabiting with the surrounding heritage context' Following the completion of the building, apartments are now being sold and for sale. Nick Myall News editor

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C.F. Møller moves on up to the waterfront

C.F. Møller moves on up to the waterfront

The property developer Olav de Linde and C.F. Møller Architects have published plans for a 144-metre tall office building close to the Port of Aarhus

Across the world, former industrial port areas are becoming transformed into new city neighbourhoods, often with striking buildings and new recreational spaces for city residents.  Aarhus is no exception, considering the rapid development of its port area. The property developer Olav de Linde and C.F. Møller Architects have published plans for a new business tower at the address Mindet 6 in the Aarhus harbour district. Blending the old and the new Currently the site holds an existing industrial complex, a legacy of the port’s history and former industry. The impressive structure will be preserved and a new tower will become integrated into the existing complex. The tower’s basic geometry originates from the existing building, as it looks to unite both the new and the old in an urban and architectural context. The intrinsic historical qualities of the existing building will be enthusiastically retained, yet also reinterpreted to allow the building to open up more towards its surroundings, to create a greater connection between indoor and outdoor spaces. On the roof of the existing complex, a new, publicly accessible rooftop garden is included in the proposals, alongside a restaurant, orangery and kitchen garden. Olav de Linde, CEO and Owner of Byggeselskabet Olav de Linde, said: “It has been important for us to develop the old building and open it up, to create a vibrant new area in the port for all city residents. The project will create a new entrepreneurial and green environment in Aarhus, as part of the city’s new recreational belt stretching all the way from the port to Marselisborg Forest. In this way, we are combining the new and the old, the city and the landscape, and residents and business”.  Bright and Slender The tower itself is designed as a bright and slender sculptural landmark, contributing vertical green foyers to both the building users and city skyline. The façades are layered to create a spatial relief in light terrazzo, which is shaped to mirror the sun’s orientation.  The façade design focuses primarily on ensuring optimum daylight conditions, attractive views out and a healthy indoor climate.  With its three cantilevering vertical foyers, the building’s geometry is multi-oriented, with characterful and textural layering on multiple scales. The location’s potential, with its proximity to the city and the sea, favourable daylight conditions and natural outlook, forms an ideal backdrop for a very special atmosphere, ensuring a unique project that is clearly anchored in the site’s industrial history. Michael Kruse, Architect and Partner at C.F. Møller Architects, said: “Our idea and vision has been to create a bright and slender tower that is fully integrated with the existing structure on site. The building is oriented to all sides and, from 360  degrees, appears open and welcoming. This looks to appeal to both building users and city residents, by weaving the old and the new together, with ‘openness’ as the unifying thread. The high degree of public access will make the project a significant catalyst in combining both urban and professional activities”. Mindet 6 will thus constitute a significant future urban landmark for Aarhus.  Currently, the project has been submitted to the City of Aarhus’ planning department for consultation, and it is hoped that construction can commence in around 18 months’ time.

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Sea Lanes plans for Brighton unveiled

Sea Lanes plans for Brighton unveiled

Planning application submitted for much-anticipated seafront regeneration including outdoor heated swimming pool

A set of proposed plans will transform the former Peter Pan Playground site on Madeira Drive, Brighton, in the UK, by delving deep into the area’s history and culture and reviving competitive and recreational sea-swimming on Brighton Seafront. The vision for the national open water swimming centre starts with a 25m swimming pool and supporting commercial use. The pool, which will be accessible to all, will provide much needed swimming facilities in Brighton, and will act as a gateway for those looking to gain confidence to swim in the sea as well as a training hub for open water swimming events, triathlon, sea safety and lifeguard courses. The swimming pool will be supported by 39 small business units suitable for retail, health  and fitness, office space as well as a food court with street food kiosks and seating area. The plans also include a new purpose-built headquarters for the local business, SwimTrek, a leading adventure swimming holiday company and the winners of the 2017 Queens’ Award for Enterprise. From late June Sea Lanes Brighton Ltd will be running a pop-up on the site, where the plans for the proposed scheme will be on display for the public to view. The pop-up will also include swim coaching sessions in an endless pool, a pop-up sauna and an open-air events space with an exciting programme of events like silent yoga disco. Sea Lanes Brighton Ltd is an integral part of the Brighton and Hove community, made up of businesses and individuals that are passionate about open water swimming. They include: members of the Brighton Sea Swimming Club, Copsemill Properties, QED Sustainable Urban Developments and Swim Trek. Simon Murie, Managing Director, of Swim Trek, said: “Swim Trek is delighted to be part of the Sea Lanes project reigniting our sea swimming history; it is a wonderful opportunity to shine a light on open water swimming, the fastest growing sport in the UK and we look forward to having the team here. We believe the Sea Lanes development will bring back to the forefront the rich swimming history that made Brighton and Hove the destination for tourists in the 19th Century. “Using modular construction and meanwhile use, we will resurrect this much-loved part of the city and offer the local community and tourists a destination that captures the spirit of Brighton, past and present.” Rich Brett, creative director of We Like Today, the team behind the proposal design, explains “Drawing on Brighton’s rich and colourful history and dazzling disregard for conformity, Sea Lanes meanwhile scheme can help revitalise the present and shape the future of Madeira  Drive. Definitely and defiantly. This is the City with the natural edge.” Sea Lanes Brighton hope to secure planning permission in Winter 2018 and for the swimming pool to open in Spring 2019. The WAN Colour in Architecture Award 2018 is open for entries  Click here for more details or email wanawards@haymarket.com   Nick Myall News editor

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Glasgow School of Art devastated by fire

Glasgow School of Art devastated by fire

The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service incident commander at the scene of the Glasgow School of Art fire said the building was in a poor state

A massive fire has devastated Glasgow's famous art school building for the second time in four years. According to the BBC, firefighters were called to the celebrated Mackintosh building at about 23:20 on Friday 15th June. When they arrived the fire was already "well-developed". At one point 120 firefighters and 20 fire engines were at the scene. The firefighters used water from the nearby  River Clyde to tackle the blaze with fire crews  from as far away as Perth and West Lothian attending the scene. Fire service area manager David Young said the building was in a "poor state" with extensive damage to the roof, the floors and the interiors Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said the fire was "heartbreaking" Ms Sturgeon said the damage was far worse than four years ago and the building was "just a shell" She promised the Scottish government would do all it could to help Fire chiefs said they could not say how or where the fire started Neighbouring buildings including the ABC music venue have also been damaged The fire is all the more devastating as it comes within weeks of the 150th anniversary of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s birth and as celebrations were taking place to mark this event. Read WAN’s profile of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and his work here.   The WAN Awards Civic category is now open for entries  Click here for more details  or email wanawards@haymarket.com Nick Myall News editor

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Clifton Cathedral renovation completes

Clifton Cathedral renovation completes

Purcell has completed £3.1m of repairs on the 1970’s church since May 2015

Purcell, the architects, master planners and heritage consultants, has completed repairs to the Roman Catholic Cathedral Church of SS. Peter and Paul in Clifton, Bristol, in the UK, making Britain’s last major church building watertight for the first time. Purcell worked closely with the client, Clifton Diocese, to improve the internal environment while respecting the architecture of the brutalist structure, with detailed design proposals that harmonise with the richness of the iconic building. Purcell has completed £3.1m of repairs since May 2015, part-funded by £1.4m of grants from the World War 1 Centenary Cathedral Repairs Fund; the biggest beneficiary being the pitched roof which required 86 tons of replacement lead – the largest lead roofing project in Britain at the time. The Cathedral remained in use during the renovation process, hosting eight masses each week, numerous baptisms, weddings, funerals and special services. Purcell addressed the physical repairs that the building so desperately needed, but also focused attention on the internal conditions to provide better improved levels of comfort to the building’s users and visitors. A condition of the project’s funding was that it opened up parts of the building to the public that has previously been inaccessible: this includes full access to the gallery over the iconic baptistery; and re-opening of a staircase that had previously been sealed off. Clifford Martin, Partner at Purcell’s Bristol office, said: ‘Our conviction was for the building to become watertight, and safe and open for use, but also not to lose any of its rigour and quality as a superb exponent of the late brutalist era. The works have been undertaken with the intention to both repair and protect the building, and to magnify and celebrate its original design and detail. The Cathedral, in common with many buildings of its type and era, was built in difficult times. Our aim for the repairs projects was, at all times, to consider what the intent for its design and execution had been in order to remain true to the building’s principles.’ The work carried out by Purcell takes care to retain the brutalist building’s high-quality concrete aesthetic, which in many areas was distinctively board-marked with the coarse grain of Russian Redwood planks. The design and installation of new services keeps the Cathedral safe and open, preventing further deterioration to the building fabric and offers a long-term solution to the underlying problems of the original construction, making the building fully fit for purpose for both worshipers and visitors. Design Statement Originally constructed between 1969–73 to the designs of Ron Weeks of the Percy Thomas Partnership, Grade II* listed Clifton Cathedral was critically acclaimed for its serenity and simplicity, and the modest ‘theatre-like’ composition of its irregular, elongated hexagonal plan. However, the building was never fully watertight and, despite numerous attempts to resolve the problem, the leakages remained unresolved. 45 years of water ingress caused damage to the internal finishes as well as affecting the unseen structure and services. The practice worked closely with the Lead Sheet Association to ensure that rigorous standards were met while instigating minimum impact on the building’s historical aesthetic. Although the result is modestly different from the original roof, the quality of the leadwork will ensure its long-term survival. Leakage was also present in the Cathedral’s concrete cladding and Purcell’s research took the architects deep into the building’s archives in a move to comprehend, from the original drawings, the causes of the problems. This was followed by hands-on studies to understand the construction details of the concrete cladding, the composition of the joints behind the panels, and how each unit was reinforced. Appropriate repairs were undertaken to address spalling, using Corennie granite chippings matched from the original construction of the precast cladding panels. Internal human comfort factors were unmaintainable prior to Purcell’s intervention. The building’s glazing required an urgent update from double-glazed Georgian wired glass – some of which was slipping from its framing causing draught and leakage – to a self-cleaning thermally-broken system. Poor quality, low-illuminance artificial lighting was inadequate for modern-day requirements and difficult to replace safely. Lighting design consultancy Lighting Design and Technology designed a fully dimmable, ultra-bright LED system which maximises the potential of the original lighting plans which were never effectively realised. The building’s formerly-inefficient heating has been redesigned by M&E consultant Method in a custom-built plant room extension. The wiring has been replaced making the Cathedral properly fit for purpose and safe to use. The WAN Awards Civic category is now open for entries  Click here for more details  or email wanawards@haymarket.com Nick Myall News editor

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