WUC RECLAIMING THE STREETS SYMPOSIUM

SATURDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2018

SEARCH   
Subscribe to News Review free now
  • SEND US NEWS
  • WAN AWARDS
  • ECOWAN
  • SECTOR NEWS
  • METRO NEWS
  • Tech Spot
  • News in Pictures News in Pictures
WAN Jobs
News Review
Podcasts
WAN Urban Challenge
WAN Awards

Foster + Partners break ground in Shanghai

Lead News

Foster + Partners 

With this project Foster + Partners are aiming to provide a modern landmark inspired by Shanghai’s rich history and industrial past

The first office tower to be built in the newly regenerated Suhewan area of Shanghai broke ground last week. The 200-metre signature tower for China Resources Land forms the centrepiece of the Suhewan East Urban Complex, which aims to introduce a richer mix of functions to the predominantly residential area of the city. The development is part of the city’s 2020 vision of drawing development towards the eastern quarter of Shanghai. The 42-storey building is situated alongside a new Suhewan Park and an underground retail complex, with excellent connections to metro stations nearby, acting as a catalyst for bringing new businesses to the area. The tower has been designed as an animated backdrop to the park, with scenic lifts that rise to the rooftop. The lower levels capture views of the park to the east, and as the building rises above the surrounding low-rise residential fabric it

... read more
WUC RECLAIMING THE STREETS SYMPOSIUM

A tile for all seasons

A tile for all seasons

The inauguration of a scalable climate adaptation system for future cities has taken place in Copenhagen...

As cities across the globe are being forced to cope with an ever changing climate and the conditions that result this new product offers a convienient adaptation solution. On a 50 m pavement stretch at Nørrebro in Copenhagen you can now walk on water. A pilot sidewalk for the innovative climate adaptation project The Climate Tile is now laid out in front of Café Heimdalsgade22, to the delight of guests and residents in the street. The project will be inaugurated September 27th by the City of Copenhagen’s Mayor of Technical and Environmental Affairs. The Climate Tile pilot sidewalk not only contributes to the street’s climate adaptation, but it also adds further qualities in terms of trees and planting, spaces for stay and a more beautiful surface. The Climate Tile is designed by THIRD NATURE and developed in collaboration with IBF and ACO Nordic, as a new scalable climate adaptation solution aimed at densely populated cities. The pilot stretch is a huge milestone in The Climate Tile’s multiannual development process and will be celebrated by the project team together with the City of Copenhagen, Realdania, The Market Development Fund and other collaborators. Ninna Hedeager, Mayor of Technical and Environmental Affairs will officially open the sidewalk September 27th at 5pm in front of the café at Heimdalsgade22.  ABOUT THE CLIMATE TILE The Climate Tile is a new scalable climate adaption system for future cities. It equips the sidewalk as we know it with a set of additional capabilities - abilities that not only treat water in a purely technical manner but celebrate water as a valuable resource. The Climate Tile reintroduces the natural water circuit in the existing cities by a simple process that manages the rainwater from the roof and sidewalks and ensures that the water runs to the right place e.g. to plant holes and water banks. It can catch and redirect 30% of the projected extra rainwater coming due to climate change, and thereby prevent overloads within the existing drainage infrastructure “We are happy to be able to now demonstrate a scalable climate adaptation system. Beyond working 1% of the time when we have climate accelerated rain incidents, the solution furthermore creates value for the city the remaining 99%. We believe our streets are the bloodstreams of society where people meet and that the sidewalk is an underappreciated part of our infrastructure that holds great potential for future communities in our ever-growing cities,” says Flemming Rafn Thomsen, partner at THIRD NATURE. PLUG & PLAY The Climate Tile develops and couples traditionally separate functions. With the development of The Climate Tile, future sidewalks will collect and manage water, whilst contributing to the growth of an urban nature and improved microclimate. Thereby the tile generates added value for the citizens and raises the level of life quality and general health within the city. The project is seen largely as an inclusive solution in synergy with both roads, bike paths, signage, urban furniture, town squares, urban nature and more. "The Climate Tile represents an exciting approach to climate adaptation and urban development, where the two things are merged into one scalable system. We look forward to following the Climate Tile, what role it can play in the City’s climate adaptation and how the citizens welcome it," says Jan Rasmussen, project manager at the Center for Climate Change Adaptation at the City of Copenhagen.

... read more

PLP adds some shine to Milan’s Unilever Tower

PLP adds some shine to Milan’s Unilever Tower

As a range of projects continue to revitalise the Porta Nuova district in Milan, PLP has published plans for a re-imagined Unilever Tower

London-based practice PLP Architecture has been commissioned by Italian real estate investment and asset management company COIMA SGR to reinvigorate the historic Unilever Tower in Milan and in the process provide a new contemporary office space. The practice’s plans also include the design of a new, smaller gateway building to the east of the tower and enhanced exterior space, which draws pedestrians in from Corso Como and beyond. The original building, designed in the late 1950s is located in the epicentre of the urban evolution of Porta Nuova, surrounded by Garibaldi Station, Piazza Gae Aulenti, Corso Como, Fondazione Giangiacomo Feltrinelli and Microsoft House. A local landmark Commenting on the visually-striking project Lee Polisano, Founding Partner and Chairman of PLP Architecture said: “It is our intention to restore the project’s status as a local landmark while, at the same time, creating flexible and contemporary interior environments which welcome the activities of the modern working world.“ The Unilever Tower which was built in 1962, had been a modernist landmark in the international style, although a recent misplaced attempt at recladding the facade has completely changed its character, rendering it unremarkable and undervalued.  The existing block and surrounding buildings have become run-down, but its location is adjacent to the busy shopping street of Corso Como, and close to the mainline station at Porta Garibaldi. The motivation for this design project is to reinvigorate the building to provide contemporary office space, whilst also making it a relevant urban counterpoint to the vibrant neighbourhood nearby. PLP’s proposals will see the 70m high and 15,000 sq m tower stripped back to its concrete structure and provide a completely new external form and spatial arrangement. The tower will be clad in a faceted glazed curtain walling which covers the east and west elevation to substantially increase the levels of light into the workspace, while also retaining the structural strategy of the original building by expressing the primary columns in the façade. Faceted glazing  A significant area of the new façade acts as a solar power collector, accumulating energy to be used in the building. Externally, this faceted glazing reflects the sun, surrounding buildings and trees in a varying array of angles throughout the course of the day to provide an ever-changing fractured image of the building’s urban context. At the 15th floor of the pavilion, the glazing steps back to reveal a continuous terrace, providing views across the city and giving the upper levels of the building a crown-like appearance. Alongside the refurbished tower, PLP has designed a new four storey pavilion which will provide over 3,000 sq m of mixed use space for both offices and retail businesses, directly accessible from Corso Como. The building will act as an entrance marker for the development and is formed of a solid concrete ground floor structure, with splayed lightweight upper floorplates in steel and wood, like a fanned deck of cards, on which a roof garden provides amenity space for its users. Throughout the interiors PLP is using soft wood surfaces to juxtapose the hardness of the concrete structure and glazing. Promoting green mobility At the heart of Corso Como Place is a new piazza that is interconnected through bike paths, walkways and green areas, and responds to the demand for green mobility by seamlessly integrating with the rest of the city. Also commenting on th eproject Manfredi Catella, Founder and CEO of COIMA SGR went on to say: “This project allows us not only to breathe new life into an important area of the city centre, but also follows in the direction of architectural development that we adhere to, or in other words using sustainable technological innovation in order to create tangible benefits for the individuals who will be inhabiting and using the property.” Nick Myall News editor

... read more

A multi-purpose offering from Benoy

A multi-purpose offering from Benoy

Once complete this development will join the growing HKCTS If mall portfolio in China

Benoy has announced its second project with Hong Kong China Travel Service (HKCTS) - the Ningbo ‘If mall’, a future community-focused retail and commercial destination whose design has been recently unveiled to the public. The development is situated in the Jiangbei district of Ningbo on a plot bordered by the well-known Changxing Road, Hongtu Road and West North Ring Road. Positioned as a premium community retail and business centre, Ningbo If mall will be a showcase space for international and local brands as well as offer commercial and leisure environments. Benoy’s design is comprised of three major blocks covering an approximate GFA of 46,000 sq m. The planning regulations required strong interfacing with the surrounding urban areas. Benoy’s approach therefore resulted in an L-shaped layout with a continuous green, urban space woven throughout. “We were excited by the landscaping opportunities offered by the client and this site. Our design introduces an urban public park between the west side of the development and the major municipal road, as well as smaller landscaped pockets throughout the scheme to create a greener environment for the people visiting as well as working and living within the wider development,” said Qin Pang, Director at Benoy. The masterplan has ensured the retail frontage gains exposure along the well-developed Hongtu and Changxing Roads while the commercial business zone interfaces with the green, urban park on the west side of the plot. To ensure continuity throughout the design, the façades of the buildings display a unique linear form which reference Ningbo’s identity as a coastal city. As part of its extensive offerings, If mall will include a sports club, retail, supermarket, cinema, a children’s entertainment and education area as well as the commercial business centre. The community-focused development also interfaces with a neighbouring residential scheme also owned and developed by HKCTS. Ningbo If mall is currently in the advanced stage of architectural design with preliminary site works already under way. Once complete the development will join the growing HKCTS If mall portfolio. Nick Myall News editor

... read more

IN BRIEF

Perkins+Will's Los Angeles studio announces new leadership for Corporate and Commercial Projects

The Los Angeles office of global architecture and design firm Perkins+

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Principal Jon Jackson has died

Jon C. Jackson, FAIA, retired principal of national architecture firmB

DANIEL PISELLI, SENIOR ASSOCIATE AT FXCOLLABORATIVE, PROMOTED TO DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABILITY

FXCollaborative is pleased to announce that Senior Associate Daniel (D

EVENTS

26.05.2018 

Collateral event of 16th International Architecture Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia 
La Biennale di Venezia - Hong Kong Exhibition 6 May – 25 November, 2018 

09.10.2018 

Planning for Housing 
The UK's leading forum for housing delivery Allocation, Permission, Delive 

At one with the elements

At one with the elements

Large terraces capture the wind and waves on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica

Set amongst idyllic white sand beaches and coconut groves, this low-key beach home was conceived to give its inhabitants not only a visual but also a literal connection to the sand and water where it belongs. Horizontal roof planes create large indoor-outdoor spaces that integrate seamlessly and diffuse the perception of the home with its surrounding natural environment. Lightness and materiality are used to create a feeling of openness and airiness that permeates through the inhabitants. The house was raised off from the ground by three steps allowing the inhabitants to have a more direct view of the waves and the beach break. This subtle move also helped to create a feeling of levitation above the landscape and protection. The house was then split up in four horizontal roof planes which, three for each bedroom and one for the main living area. This architectural strategy allows for every space to feel as the roof belongs to that specific location whilst dematerializing the edges of the home and creating the opportunity of cross ventilation between spaces. Controlled natural light then is allowed to permeate from three sides of every space making them feel more integrated to the surrounding landscape. Traditional cinder block construction was used for the main structural walls of the house for its easy maintenance and durability. Lightweight wooden roofs float above these walls and create large overhang extensions that protect the building from the elements whilst creating outdoor decks. Studio Saxe believe that clever design should precede technology when designing a project. The pactice uses common sense bioclimatic strategies for temperature control to create spaces that require less energy consumption and provide an overall feeling of wellness. The “elevated” roofline above the walls of the house create the perfect opportunity for cross ventilation and controlled natural light. Long overhangs cool down the spaces during the day and protect from sun and rain. Active strategies are then introduced such as solar hot water, water collection, energy efficient systems, and others to supplement the passive cooling design of the project. Nick Myall News editor

... read more

A new opportunity opens up on our high streets

A new opportunity opens up on our high streets

A more creative range of retail businesses are meeting the new demand for a different kind of shopping experience

The ongoing failure of our high streets is creating a huge opportunity for forward thinking businesses. As our town and city centres are reconfigured following the closure of numerous retail outlets a fresh range of businesses have a chance to be involved in new look high streets. Increasingly shoppers are looking for an experience instead of an exhausting trawl around the shops. A more creative range of retail outlets are meeting this demand by offering wine tastings, cookery classes and even butchery classes in one example in New York.      As part of the ongoing debate surrounding our new look high streets WAN are hosting an evening Symposium event taking place at 18:00 on 20th September at the NLA in central London. BOOK NOW to secure your place at the Reclaiming the Streets Symposium, where the WAN Urban Challenge Task Force will present a Manifesto for Change to a live audience of over 100 city representatives and key stakeholders from the built environment providing a 'blueprint' for the streets of the future. Participants will discuss the issues at hand with a panel-lead debate and Q & A sessions. See the winners of the global ideas competition HERE.  Speakers at the Symposium include...  Cllr Feryal Demirci, Cabinet Member for Neighbourhoods, Transport & Parks, London Brian Kilkelly, Development Lead, Climate-KIC Pierfrancesco Maran, Deputy Mayor of Milan Peter Murray, Chair, New London Architecture Thor Nelson, Senior Urban Designer, Washington D.C. Fiona Robinson, Futures 2050 Programme, Milton Keynes Council Demetrio Scopelliti, Urban Planning Department, Municipality of Milan Hamish Stewart, Co-Founder, London Car Free Day initiative Raj Suresh, Urban Designer and Architect, Atkins Eric van der Kooij, Sr. Urbanist, City of Amsterdam  Maria Vassilakou, Deputy Mayor of Vienna David Vega-Barachowitz, Senior Urban Designer, NYC Department Olivia Walker, Head of City Development, Bosch Mobility Solution Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Flying high in San Jose

Flying high in San Jose

SJC breaks ground on Interim Gates Facility to meet record passenger growth in booming Silicon Valley

Hensel Phelps Construction Company and Fentress Architects have combined in a design-build collaboration to deliver a much-needed interim gates facility at Mineta San Jose International Airport (SJC) in the USA in response to current and predicted record passenger growth. Based on an announcement issued by SJC earlier this year, more nonstop flights and destinations are attributing to the projected more than 14 million passengers served in 2018, equaling SJC’s peak traffic levels prior to 9/11 in 2001.  The expansion will enhance flight scheduling flexibility, decrease delays, allow SJC to meet desired passenger service levels, and support current operations and planned growth. Connected to the Fentress-designed Terminal B on the south end, the budgeted $58 million facility will include five gates with passenger boarding bridges, a sixth gate position to be ground loaded, a 15,000-square-foot, 550-person hold room, and additional concession space. Terminal B, completed in 2010 by the same team as part of SJC’s Terminal Area Improvement Program, was the first LEED Silver certified terminal in the United States. Fentress’ design unites the architectural elements of the expansion with SJC’s iconic Terminal B creating an interim facility that complements the airport’s overall design concept. By embracing the Airport’s vision “to transform how Silicon Valley travels,” Fentress’ facility focus is on innovation and technology as key components in the future growth of SJC. The exterior incorporates contrasting light and dark corrugated metal panels and clerestory windows on the landside façade, allowing daylight to permeate the facility and creating an illuminated space that enhances the passenger experience. The interior wood wall panels bring a sense of warmth to the passenger boarding areas. The overall look and feel will be one of continuity relative to the current Terminal B. Recognized for designing some of the world’s best airports, the Fentress-designed Tom Bradley International Terminal at LAX is currently shortlisted in the Public Space category as part of the Society of British and International Design (SBID) Awards. The firm has active airport projects in Portland, OR, Nashville, TN, and Orlando, FL, among others.  Nick Myall News editor

... read more

To the centre of the circle...

To the centre of the circle...

This concept by Michael Jantzen blurs the lines between the inside and outside

From the architects... The Oak Tree Ring House by Santa Fe-based Michael Jantzen is a new kind of interactive place in which to live. It was designed specifically for a temperate climate. The structure consists of a large circular steel support frame in the form of four concentric rings that radiate out around a large oak tree planter in a central open courtyard. There is an array of solar cells mounted around the perimeter of the courtyard that are used to supply the electrical and hot water needs of the house. The circular section of the house around the courtyard contains the climate-controlled living space. This space is enclosed with curved sliding glass and screened panels that can be opened or closed depending on the weather conditions. The other three circular sections of the house that form concentric rings, support a variety of flat panels that can be automatically or manually moved around the perimeter of the courtyard and the glass enclosed space. Some of these panels are solid, some are covered with glass, and some are fitted with shade louvers and screens. All of the panels can be moved into many different kinds of arrangements around the support frame in order to manipulate the light and weather conditions under the canopy. It is also possible to hang vertical panels from the support frame to further control the livability of this space. Rainwater (for uses in and around the house) can be collected off of the panels and directed down through the support frame into containers buried under the house. The design of the house was developed to create an interactive environment that truly blurs the lines between the inside and the outside of a living space. The canopy of movable panels can be used to allow the sun to enter the enclosed living space during the winter, and shade it during the summer. In addition, various kinds of microclimates can be created under the canopy by moving the panels to control light, wind, rain, and temperature. Some of the microclimates can be used to grow plants in a controlled way under the canopy. Others could be created in a way that would allow the curved glass panels (that form the enclosed portion of the house) to be opened during parts of the year, in order to expand the living spaces out and beyond the perimeter of the central courtyard. All of the furniture, furnishings, storage, bath, work, and food preparation facilities are contained in cylinders of various sizes. The food preparation and bath cylinders are fixed in place, but all of the others can be rolled around and used in any part of the enclosed portion of the house, and/or anywhere under the canopy. In this way, the lines between inside and outside are blurred even more. The large oak tree planted in the open courtyard at the center of the Oak Tree Ring House, symbolically refers to the way in which the house seems to have grown out around it. Aesthetically, the tree functions as a central focal point for the house as well as a place to sit and contemplate the relationship between nature and the built environment. Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Getting straight to the Point in New York

Getting straight to the Point in New York

Hunter’s Point South Waterfront Park celebrates the completion of Phase Two

Last June marked a major milestone in the delivery of Hunter’s Point South Phase II in New York: the completion of the infrastructure, roadways and waterfront park. The park is a design collaboration between SWA/BALSLEY and WEISS/MANFREDI, with ARUP as the prime consultant and infrastructure designer, as well as lead designer for the broader development project. The opening of Phase II marks the realization of the larger park master plan, which first welcomed the public in 2013 with the completion of Phase I. Spearheaded by the New York City Economic Development Corporation, on behalf of the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, the project presents a new model of urban ecology and a prototype for innovative sustainable design. The park’s integrated design weaves together infrastructure, landscape, architecture, and art, and is located adjacent to the City’s largest affordable housing development since the 1970s. “It is a great honour to work on a project like this for the people of New York and specifically for the Hunter’s Point neighbourhood,” said ARUP Principal Tom Kennedy. “Reforming disused areas of our densely populated city is an incredibly important part of our social responsibility as designers in New York, and the new Hunter’s Point development provided the perfect opportunity to allow people to explore and enjoy the city’s waterfront.” The park design transforms 11 acres of abandoned industrial land opposite Manhattan into a new model for urban waterfront development. The park anticipates the inevitable flooding patterns and rising water levels of the East River while leveraging its rich histories and spectacular views to establish a multi-layered recreational and cultural destination and environmental habitat that completes the team’s collaboration. The designers have sculpted an industrial peninsula to feel like New York City’s newest “island,” a dreamlike landscape surrounded by salt marsh, where one can be a part of or apart from the world. Visitors arrive by crossing a narrow bridge to discover a land art installation: Luminescence by New York-based artist Nobuho Nagasawa, which depicts the phases of the moon with glowing six-foot discs. “It’s a new kind of park,” said lead landscape architect Tom Balsley of SWA/BALSLEY, as his 25-year vision for this waterfront transformation is finally fulfilled. “Hunter’s Point South is at once resilient infrastructure and contemplative retreat—a dynamic, living platform with extraordinary power to touch the daily lives of so many people.” As an extension of Phase I, the site’s paths unfurl into a promenade at the Park’s southern terminus, leading to the Overlook, a 30-foot-high cantilevered platform whose steel-clad formwork recalls the site’s industrial legacy while offering unparalleled views of the Manhattan skyline and East River. It is intimately connected to the tidal marsh and trails below and the river beyond. “For us, it has been a dream to be a part of a design team that is creating a waterfront park like no other,” said Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi, founders of WEISS/MANFREDI. “Hunter’s Point South is equally a place of discovery, ecological resilience, and extraordinary drama with the Overlook that hovers above the water to frame the city’s magical skyline.” Pathways also lead through sculpted grasslands and a shaded picnic promontory embedded with wooden “rafts” for relaxing. Beyond, three fitness terraces descend the site’s dramatic grade with views down the river to the bridges. A kayak launch connects the community to the water’s edge and will host boating and educational programs for local students and residents.  The park officially opened to the public on June 27, 2018. Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Hyperloop’s next step: Amsterdam to Frankfurt in 53 minutes?

Hyperloop’s next step: Amsterdam to Frankfurt in 53 minutes?

UNStudio are partnering with Hardt Hyperloop to present a vision for the Station of the Future

The UNStudio Futures Team (UNSFutures) has presented its vision for the ‘Station of the Future’ at the first edition of HyperSummit, which took place in Utrecht, the Netherlands and was organised by Hardt Hyperloop. The first edition of the HyperSummit was focused on urgency, research and collaboration, with numerous partners speaking about their contribution to the possibilities for realising the European hyperloop. Special attention was also devoted to the kick-off study of the Hyperloop Implementation Programme (HIP), a study which looks at implementation questions relating to the Amsterdam-Frankfurt project. Urgency Global urbanisation, population growth and urgent environmental concerns create infrastructural challenges that cannot be resolved with our current modes of transport. A sustainable alternative to air travel is therefore imperative.  Ben van Berkel, Principal Architect and Founder of UNStudio and UNSense: ‘The hyperloop is not only a realistic and viable alternative to flying, it is going to revolutionise travel. It will provide extremely fast travel times with direct connections between cities, enabling completely new ways of working and spending our leisure time, which in turn will lead to a multitude of economic, environmental and knowledge exchange benefits.’  Lucienne Krosse, Thematic Leader Intelligent Energy Efficient Buildings and Cities, InnoEnergy: ‘The hyperloop uses clean energy and is perfect for commuters between the major European cities. With the exponential growth in air traffic and the related CO2 emissions, it is vitally important that the development of the hyperloop receives an extra boost to accelerate the actual implementation and European rollout.’ Using technology powered by solar panels, hyperloop will produce no sound or environmental emissions and can provide the necessary energy to power itself. It will be the first ever 100% electric transport system that can safely transport a high volume of passengers from city to city at unprecedented speeds and journey times. Transfer Hubs – the Stations of the Future UNStudio’s Futures Team was invited to join the Hardt Hyperloop Implementation Programme in order to create a vision for the urban integration of the hyperloop in cities and towns of different sizes and in different locations within these cities. In UNStudio’s vision for the hyperloop transfer hub, which was presented at the HyperSummit yesterday, the station has been envisioned as a series of tessellating components which can adapt to a range of possible contexts: city-centre, edge of city or adjoining an existing infrastructure hub, such as an airport. Existing cities mean existing parameters, and UNStudio envisages a symbiotic relationship with its local environment: an integrated piece of an urban composition.  Modularity and connectivity at all scales  Commitment to connected modularity is at the core of the hyperloop system. It's what makes the system scalable, adaptable and resilient; able to adapt its service in real time, according to demand throughout the day. The route itself will be modular: comprised of both a super-high-speed network and more regional networks, which will connect urban areas and important hubs (such as ports and airports) to the ultra-high-speed network.  This modular thinking extends throughout the system, from tracks to vehicles and also forms the basis of UNStudio’s vision for the hyperloop stations. From platforms to functional spaces and to the roof which extends out over the transfer hubs, a modular design framework organises and connects all parts. The modular system upon which the design is based enables the station to adapt to existing conditions, blending into the existing built fabric. It also allows us to integrate above and underground, growing modules up to meet a dense inner city neighbourhood, or down to blend with a more low-rise setting.  Once inside the station, the speed of the hyperloop vehicles allows platforms to be curved rather than orthogonal, bringing an inviting organic form to soften the geometry of the module. Each module can hold a different function, from the purely pragmatic luggage check-in or bicycle dock, to daycare for busy parents or small biophilic pocket parks for kids and adults alike. In this way the modular strategy allows the functional and the activity-based elements to overlap and interrelate, creating spaces to meet, explore and play. A station powering a region Commenting on the project UNStudio’s Ben van Berkel said: ‘In the very near future, buildings will function as batteries, providing energy not only for their own immediate needs, but also for surrounding public amenities and transportation modes.’  What if each hyperloop station acted as a battery for solar energy produced, not only by the station itself, but also along the network? UNStudio believes that this could bring about a shift away from dependency on centralised power plants and towards energy storage that connects to local micro-grids. Surplus energy produced at the transfer hubs and along hyperloop’s tubes would power the autonomous vehicles, buses and bicycles which passengers can switch to in order to complete their journey. The station then becomes a battery which regulates the highs and lows of the solar-powered system, as well as regulating its internal environment through high-performance materials which respond to changing heat, light and humidity levels within.  Unlocking new functions through speed The hyperloop offers to fulfil a dual purpose, for the fast transport of humans and goods alike, but the speed of hyperloop is what it’s all about – at speeds between 600 and 1000 km/h – it can travel at the same speed as airplanes but deliver passengers to the heart of our cities and connect them immediately to further forms of sustainable transport.  The speed of hyperloop offers to radically reimagine knowledge transfer, establishing a network of mobile learning spaces which connect up established institutions, drawing them closer toward one another. Spaces of work will also naturally coalesce around hyperloop stations, as hubs become natural meeting spaces for busy workers.  From a produce perspective, hyperloop could be the catalyst required to shift from a centralised system of industrial production to the hyper-local economies promised by digital infrastructure. By collapsing distances we can start to close the supply chain between production and consumption, using real-time feedback to ensure production matches consumer needs exactly. Speed of delivery also means bringing super-fresh, high quality food, picked or caught the very same day, right into the city-centre, creating the base for daily markets to emerge. We can also envisage benefits in medicine - the transportation of grown organs or bio based transplants where time is a crucial factor in saving the life of someone in need. Hyperloop Implementation Programme (HIP) During the HyperSummit special attention was also devoted to the kick-off study of the Hyperloop Implementation Programme (HIP), a program of Hardt Hyperloop. During this kick-off study, the hyperloop company from Delft, together with leading parties, looked at implementation questions relating to the Amsterdam-Frankfurt project.  Stefan Marges, HIP Project Manager said: ‘We constantly ask ourselves what impact the implementation of the hyperloop has on the environment, our social life and the economy.’ The research showed, among other things, that a route between Amsterdam and Frankfurt is 450 kilometres long, and with seven intermediate stations the journey takes about 50 minutes. This is in contrast to the four hours you lose when regular transport is used. With this route alone, more than 4.3 million inhabitants could be served, and on an annual basis, the hyperloop could carry more than 48 million passengers. The hyperloop would offer a sustainable alternative for the approximately 2 million aircraft passengers on an annual basis, saving 83,690 tonnes of CO2 emissions per year.  Nick Myall News editor

... read more
Tenderstream
WORLD INTERIORS NEWS WAN URBAN CHALLENGE

Sign up to News Review

Weekly news and features direct to your inbox

Thank you
for subscribing to
WAN News Review