WUC RECLAIMING THE STREETS SYMPOSIUM

THURSDAY 16 AUGUST 2018

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Genoa bridge collapse: What we know so far...

Lead News

The remains of the Ponte Morandi in Genoa, Italy by Salvatori 

At least 39 people were killed when dozens of vehicles fell 45m (148ft) from the Morandi bridge in Genoa, Italy, during a storm on Tuesday 14.8.18 with cars and trucks buried under the rubble.  The authorities immediately dispatched emergency service personnel in order to rescue people from under the wreckage as a major rescue operation, which is still continuing, got underway. Officials have warned that the scale of the disaster was such that the toll was likely to rise.   Here’s what we know so far  The Morandi bridge carries a major road, the A10 toll motorway, which serves the Italian Riviera and links northern Italy to France. It was designed by Riccardo Morandi who also designed the much larger Lake Maracaibo bridge in Venezuela. The 1.2km (0.8 mile) long bridge spans the Polcevera waterway, railway lines and various industrial buildings. The brid

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WUC RECLAIMING THE STREETS SYMPOSIUM

Making waves in Shenzhen

Making waves in Shenzhen

BIG has created an undulating building envelope which creates a rippled skin around these towers and breaks away from the traditional glass curtain wall

Designed by BIG, the 96,000m2 office development for the state-owned Shenzhen Energy Company is designed to look and feel at home in the cultural, political and business centre of Shenzhen, while standing out as a new social and sustainable landmark at the main axis of the Chinese city. The volume and height of the new headquarters for Shenzhen Energy Company was predetermined by the urban masterplan for the central area. The development consists of two towers rising 220m to the north and 120m to the south, linked together at the feet by a 34m podium housing the main lobbies, a conference center, cafeteria and exhibition space. Together with the neighboring towers, the development forms a continuous curved skyline marking the center of Shenzhen. BIG developed an undulating building envelope which creates a rippled skin around both towers and breaks away from the traditional glass curtain wall. By folding parts of the envelope that would reduce solar loads and glare, a façade with closed and open parts oscillate between transparency to one side and opacity to the other. The closed parts provide high-insulation while blocking direct sunlight and providing views out. As a result, the towers appear as a classical shape with an organic pattern from a distance and as an elegant pleated structure from close-up. The sinuous direction of the façade corresponds to the solar orientation: it maximizes north-facing opening for natural light and views, while minimizing exposure on the sunny sides. This sustainable facade system reduces the overall energy consumption of the building without any moving parts or complicated technology. From the street level, a series of walls are pulled open for visitors to enter the commercial spaces from the north and south end of the buildings, while professionals enter from the front plaza into the daylight-filled lobby. Once inside, the linearity of the building façade continues horizontally: the pixel landscape of the stone planter boxes is in the same dimensions and arranged in the same pattern as the ripples of the building envelope. The offices for Shenzhen Energy Company are placed on the highest floors for employees to enjoy views to the city, while the remaining floors are rentable office space. Within the protruded areas of the building, the façade is stretched out—two smooth deformations create large spaces for extra good views on each floor, meeting rooms, executive clubs and staff facilities. The folded wall provides a free view through clear glass in one direction and creates a condition with plenty of diffused daylight by reflecting the direct sun between the interior panels. Even when the sun comes directly from the east or west, the main part of the solar rays are reflected off of the glass due to the flat angle of the windows. As the sun sets, the changing transparency and the curved lines of the façade create an almost wood-like texture or a scene of vertical terraced hills. The slits that open between the curtain wall to reveal special spaces such as boardrooms, executive offices and breakout areas, lend the building a distinct character from different parts of the city. Nick Myall News editor

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UNStudio to create a green spine for Melbourne

UNStudio to create a green spine for Melbourne

Beulah International select UNStudio's proposal for Australia’s tallest tower from designs submitted by six of the world's leading architecture firms

Beulah International has announced that 'Green Spine', the design proposal submitted by UNStudio with Cox Architecture has been selected as the winning design for their latest project, Southbank by Beulah, a more than $2 billion mixed-use tower which will be the tallest tower in Australia, located in the heart of Melbourne. The winning proposal was selected by a seven-member jury. Other shortlisted teams included BIG, Coop Himmelb(l)au, MAD, MVRDV and OMA. Commenting on the win for UNStudio Ben van Berkel said: "We are truly delighted that our design has been selected as the winning proposal for this very exciting project! For our proposal to be selected by Beulah - such a forward-focussed developer - and from entries by such an exceptional group of our peers is a true honour. From the outset we worked with a fantastic team of cultural placemakers, sustainability consultants, landscape designers, artists and engineers to achieve a fully integrated design. This truly is a great result for everybody involved!" Beulah International Executive Director Adelene Teh went on to say: “The Green Spine showed work by a strong, multidisciplinary collaborative team that is a bold, yet thoroughly considered approach to creating a context driven landmark as an addition to Melbourne's skyline. In its details, the scheme displays a strong intent for well-considered public and private amenity, and at street level, the proposal displays qualities that will truly transform the public realm by eroding the hard edges that is prevalent in Southbank.” Caroline Bos said: "I could not feel happier at this moment. The competition was incredibly inspiring; I would like to congratulate all architects on their fantastic designs and Beulah and all parties involved in running and judging the competition. On behalf of our whole team I would like to say a wholehearted thank you for the trust placed in us. We very much look forward to the next stages, and contributing to a better Southbank and wider Melbourne with our Green Spine." ‘Green Spine' - A City within a City UNStudio's design proposal for Southbank by Beulah aims to establish a new destination for the Southbank area and Melbourne. The proposal is integrally organised by one Big Detail: a ‘Green Spine’ of vertically networked platforms, terraces and verandas. This multifaceted spine is created by the splitting open of the potential single mass at its core, thereby forming two separate high rise structures and causing them to reveal the almost geological strata of their core layers as they rise above a light-filled canyon. As a result of this design intervention, the towers that emerge on either side can enjoy porous city views and vastly improved contextual links, while the residences, offices and the hotel benefit from increased daylight and access to outdoor spaces. The orientation of the Green Spine further enables an extension of the public realm on the podium, the continuation of green onto the towers and facilitates orientation to the CBD and the Botanical Garden at the top of the towers. The taller of the two towers will be entirely residential and reach a height of 356.2 metres. This tower will house a publicly accessible garden at its top. The lower tower will be home to a hotel and commercial space and top out at 252.2 metres. In addition to being fully integrated within the existing Melbourne network of cultural, entertainment, leisure and commercial venues on offer, with its variety of programmes and connectivities, the design further proposes a mixed-use building that is a city in itself. A host of programmes, including recreation, retail, offices, residential, hotel and exhibition spaces are integrated into the vertically stepped public infrastructure – an infrastructure that is formed by indoor-outdoor spatial frames that embed nature, public space and culture. The Green Spine Ben van Berkel said: “In addition to providing the towers with a twisting, sculptural silhouette, the Green Spine is an architectural element that incorporates a multitude of functions in one fluid gesture.” The spine extends the Southbank Boulevard upwards and acts as the key organisational element of the building with respect to programme, culture, landscape and sustainability. In addition to housing a variety of amenities, all programmes are linked to the Green Spine. At ground level, this spine directly engages with Southbank Boulevard by bringing people up and into the building, thereby expanding the public realm vertically. From the public park at the top of the podium, the Spine continues to entwine itself around the two towers, where it culminates at the top of the residential tower in ‘Future Gardens’. Mixed-use Podium The design proposal for Southbank by Beulah was motivated by the concepts of togetherness joint ownership and open access for local residents and the wider community. We therefore created the space not only to be accessible and tailored to the users of the building, but also for the people of - and visitors to - Melbourne. To this end, the podium and its public rooftop park are reserved for public use. Within the podium a marketplace, retail and entertainment spaces and a @BMW experience centre are housed. The Marketplace Entrance is a permeable open space that invites both visitors and residents. The retail spaces have their own unique access to balconies and terraces, allowing shoppers to engage with an environment that differs from that of typical retail mall or street. The connection from ground level unfolds through stairs and platforms, leading the visitors up along the retail and entertainment programme and finally merges into the public garden at the top of the podium. Nick Myall News editor

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Italian bridge collapse leads to multiple fatalities

Italian bridge collapse leads to multiple fatalities

Major road bridge collapses during heavy storm in Genoa, northern Italy

A motorway bridge has collapsed near the northwest Italian city of Genoa, sending vehicles plummeting up to 90m (295ft) to the ground and killing at least 35 people, officials say. Video footage appears to show one of the towers holding up the suspension bridge collapsing in stormy weather. According to the BBC, vehicles fell along with bridge debris on to rail tracks below. Transport Minister Danilo Toninelli spoke of an "immense tragedy" and France has offered Italy its support. Ian Firth, a structural engineer and specialist in bridges, said the Morandi bridge is of a very unusual design. “It is too early to say what caused the tragic collapse, but as this reinforced and pre-stressed concrete bridge has been there for 50 years, it is possible that corrosion of tendons or reinforcement may be a contributory factor," the former president of the Institution of Structural Engineers said. Shares in Atlantia, the toll road operator which runs much of the country's motorways, fell 6.3% after news of the collapse. The bridge fell around 11:30 local time (09:30 GMT) during heavy rain. Police reported a violent cloudburst. "It was just after 11:30 when we saw lightning strike the bridge," eyewitness Pietro M all' Asa was quoted as saying by Italy's Ansa news agency. "And we saw the bridge going down." According to an eye witness traffic was queuing on the bridge at the time. "It's not acceptable that such an important bridge... was not built to avoid this kind of collapse," Deputy Transport Minister Edoardo Rixi was quoted by Reuters news agency as saying from Genoa. French President Emmanuel Macron has tweeted a message of sympathy to the people of Italy, writing in both Italian and French. He said France was ready to offer any necessary aid. Cars and trucks were trapped in the rubble and nearby buildings damaged, according to an AFP photographer at the scene. One image posted by the regional emergency services shows a truck perched at the end of the surviving bridge section immediately before the drop. The Morandi Bridge, built in the 1960s, stands on the A10 toll motorway, which serves the Italian Riviera and southern coast of France. The missing section was dozens of metres in length, and ran across the span of the Polcevera river. Work to shore up the foundation of the bridge was being carried out at the time of the collapse but the structure was constantly monitored, the motorway operator was quoted as saying by Reuters. Nick MyallNews editor  

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IN BRIEF

The 100-year life: the role of housing, planning and design

Experts call for integrated approach to housing, planning and design t

RedBook Agency offers clients a new way to source suitable architects and landscape designers

A new service linking architects and designers with potential clients

BDP APPOINTS THREE PRINCIPALS

BDP has appointed three new principals who will join the company&rsquo

EVENTS

26.05.2018 

Collateral event of 16th International Architecture Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia 
La Biennale di Venezia - Hong Kong Exhibition 6 May – 25 November, 2018 

Steven Holl Architects win in Ireland

Steven Holl Architects win in Ireland

An exhilarating Centre for Creative Design is set to emerge in Dublin

University College Dublin (UCD) and Malcolm Reading Consultants (MRC) have announced that the team led by Steven Holl Architects (SHA) has won the Future Campus – University College Dublin International Design Competition. The international jury—which included Sir David Adjaye, Principal, Adjaye Associates; Ann Beha, Principal, Ann Beha Architects and Member, Harvard University Design Advisory Panel; acclaimed urban planner Joe Berridge, Partner, Urban Strategies, Inc.; Dermot Desmond, Chairman, International Investment & Underwriting; Sean Mulryan, Founder, Chairman and CEO, Ballymore; and Dr Paul Thompson, Vice-Chancellor, Royal College of Art, London amongst other distinguished figures—was hugely impressed by SHA’s design proposal for a Centre for Creative Design and Entrance Precinct Masterplan vision for a circa 24 ha area of the overall campus. SHA’s placemaking strategy focuses on creating an exhilarating Centre for Creative Design as a gateway presence which cues to seven new quadrangles of open green space, designed to enhance the campus’ historic features and woodlands. A new pedestrian spine, parallel to the campus’ original spine, creates an H-plan organization, lined with weather canopies that double as solar connectors, forming the infrastructure of an energy network. Cafés and social spaces are located along paths for informal gathering; landscape spaces are animated by water-retention ponds, rain- and wind-protected seating areas and preserved specimen trees. Steven Holl said: “We are very honored to win. It’s a very important and inspiring project for Steven Holl Architects and we look forward to working with UCD. Our masterplan and the new UCD Centre for Creative Design are not just iconic objects − they reflect on the history and quality of UCD’s campus, responding to the particulars of the site to create place and space.” The Centre, set by a plaza and a reflecting pool, displays prismatic forms inspired by the geology of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Giant’s Causeway. It features abundant use of natural light, which is captured by two vertical structures angled at 23 degrees, mirroring the earth’s tilt. The auditorium echoes the shape of UCD’s iconic dodecahedral 1972 water tower; the Centre’s towers respond to the water tower’s pentagonal pillar. The Centre is intended to encourage creative collaboration and interaction with a “circuit of social connection” that allows students, faculty and visitors to peer into maker and classroom spaces through glass walls but also respects deep creativity by providing spaces for concentration and silence. SHA was supported by Dublin-based Kavanagh Tuite Architects, analysts Brightspot Strategy, structural engineers Arup, landscape architects and urban designers HarrisonStevens and climate engineers Transsolar.  Professor Andrew J. Deeks, President of University College Dublin and competition Jury Chair, said: “Holl’s vision is intriguing and striking—combining an iconic design for the Centre for Creative Design with a masterplan distinguished by a few considered, highly intelligent moves that open up the centre of the campus and use creative landscaping to intensify its natural beauty. The Centre for Creative Design promises to be an exhilarating presence, announcing UCD from afar, creating a new Dublin landmark, and giving visitors, students and faculty a definite sense of arrival. We are fortunate to have an expansive campus which brims with potential. We searched globally for the best talent and were rewarded. Now we can create the world-class environment UCD deserves.” Professor Hugh Campbell, Professor of Architecture at University College Dublin and member of the competition jury, added: “Holl’s winning proposal combines the striking form of the Centre for Creative Design building with a clear and robust masterplan. The Centre for Creative Design will allow UCD to harness and develop the creativity of its students in responding to the challenges and opportunities facing society. Holl’s emphasis on daylight and social connection promises a building which will enable and encourage collaboration and interaction, a building which is open and welcoming, a building in which cutting-edge technologies and core creative practices can fruitfully combine.”  The four other finalists comprised, Diller Scofidio + Renfro (US), O’Donnell + Tuomey (Ireland), Studio Libeskind (US) and UNStudio (Netherlands). The first stage of the competition attracted expressions of interest from 98 teams in 28 countries.  Known as Ireland’s Global University, University College Dublin is the country’s largest and most internationally-engaged higher education body. Founded as an independent university 160 years ago by the visionary John Henry Newman, UCD has been a vital and influential force in shaping modern Ireland, both politically and culturally. UCD’s ability to foster creativity and expressiveness is reflected by alumni including the 20th century’s outstanding author, James Joyce; film maker Gabriel Byrne; and comedian Dara Ó Briain; as well as many successful architects and designers. Nick Myall News editor

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Seeing the bigger picture

Seeing the bigger picture

A striking new cinema has opened in Ireland within a moulded-concrete tower awash with natural light

Leading film producers Ed Guiney and Andrew Lowe of Element Pictures have opened a new independent cinema, designed by Tom dePaor, in Galway, Ireland. The structure incorporates a Georgian merchant house and creates a contemporary concrete “castle” in the city centre. Fourteen years after the project was first proposed, Pálás (or Palace) has finally opened its doors. It is a unique and intriguing architectural space, right in the heart of the Latin Quarter in Galway. This striking and world-class specialist cinema is committed to programming the best of new and classic films, along with the best of Irish and international independent films within a moulded-concrete tower awash in natural light. The playful space, setting intimate nooks against soaring voids, delivers a cinema experience “with the same level of care,” says Lowe, “as with the films we produce.” Inspired by cinemas of the early 20th century, Pálás features elaborate red-velvet curtains, theatrical lighting and plush seating from 70-year-old French manufacturer Quinette Gallay. Angular poured-concrete staircases criss-cross through the seven-storey building, leaving stepped silhouettes in the negative space underneath. “You get lost in there, which is the trick,” says architect Tom dePaor of County Wicklow practice dePaor. He says he designed the space “as a monument to a gregarious town that thrives on festivals,” like July’s Galway Film Fleadh. “I wanted to make the sort of plain, powerful building well known to this side of Ireland, and then to sweeten the pill with beautiful, decorative elements.” Those elements take the form of 24 resin-coated glass windows donated by local artist Patrick Scott, taking visual cues from the gel filters used in stage lighting. “They’re like little projectors that play off the concrete and colour the rooms red, amber and purple,” says dePaor. “And at night they project outwards onto the city.” The new structure looms behind the preserved Georgian façade, with the foyer in a courtyard space between them. Three screening rooms in the contemporary building stack one atop the other, with a contemporary bar, and light filled restaurant “That was our vision,” says Lowe, “a grown-up experience, where you can eat before or after, take a glass of wine into your film... and no sticky floors.” Lowe says the programme will include feature films, shorts, classics, foreign language and animated films, feature length documentaries, filmmaker Q&A’s, festivals and inventive special events like Elfeoke and The Rocky Horror Picture Show where dressing up is encouraged. Nick Myall News editor

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Gathering pace in Malta

Gathering pace in Malta

This striking redevelopment of Mercury House in Malta by Zaha Hadid Architects integrates residential apartments and a boutique hotel

Malta’s location at the midpoint of the Mediterranean has made the island a centre of trade and tourism. Welcoming almost 2.5 million international tourists last year with the number of visitors growing by almost 10% annually, Malta’s hospitality industry employs 30% of the country’s workforce and is anticipated to grow to 40% of the island’s employment over the coming decade. Located on Malta's East coast, Paceville has developed over the past 50 years as the island’s tourist and entertainment centre, accommodating new projects that address this continued growth.  Established as a cluster of holiday homes in the early 20th Century and developed into a major tourist hub from the 1960’s, Paceville is at the heart of St Julian’s in Malta where many of the island’s restaurants, bars, nightclubs, casinos and marina are located, together with international hotels including the Hilton, Le Meridien, InterContinental and Westin. The renovation and redevelopment of Mercury House by Zaha Hadid Architects integrates residential apartments and a boutique hotel within Malta’s most dynamic urban environment. Creating new public spaces and amenities for the island’s residents and visitors, the design responds to Paceville’s key urban challenges by investing in its civic realm and increasing its limited housing supply. Derelict for more than twenty years, the 9,405 sq.m. site includes the remaining façades of the old Mercury House that date from 1903. Two underground vaults created during the Cold War are also within the site’s boundary. Working with Malta’s leading conservation architect, these heritage structures will be renovated as integral parts of the new development; restoring the old Mercury House façades and reinstating its remaining historic interiors as gathering spaces and entrance for the apartments and hotel. Restoring the facades of the old Mercury House to their original height enables this heritage structure to be read as a whole. The new development lands behind these renovated façades, defining the original Mercury House as the focus of a new public piazza.  Including water features and fountains for children to play, as well as seating areas to relax, the new piazza will be the centre of its community by day, and one of Malta’s primary gathering places by night to suit the island’s al fresco lifestyle. With the refurbished Mercury House at its base, the 24,500 sq.m. renovation and redevelopment incorporates civic amenities including cafes and shops surrounding the large piazza together with a new café pavilion of soft curves and a transparency that accentuates the solidity of the old Mercury House. The 31-storey tower of residential apartments and hotel is aligned at street level to integrate with Paceville’s existing urban fabric and to reduce its footprint, maximizing civic space within the new piazza. Conceived as two volumes stacked vertically, the tower incorporates a realignment that expresses the different functional programmes within. The lower 9-storey volume houses apartments while the higher 19-storey volume is rotated to orientate guest rooms of the new hotel towards the Mediterranean, providing optimal views of Malta’s renowned azure sea. Re-aligning the tower’s higher floors reduces solar gain and instils a sense of dynamism within its silhouette that changes when viewed from different directions around Paceville. The transitioning floors (levels 10, 11 and 12) accommodate the tower’s realignment and house the dramatic public spaces of the hotel’s reception lobby as well as an outdoor pool with views to the sea. The insulated façade, combined with limited glazing in areas of significant direct sunlight, is designed to provide shading and increase the tower’s overall thermal performance.  The tower’s design also incorporates the results of local pedestrian comfort and wind climate assessments. Marrying a variety of public, residential and commercial functions together with the creation of a vibrant new civic space, the redevelopment of Mercury House includes the renovation of derelict heritage structures and responds to the demands of the island’s future socio-economic development. Nick Myall News editor

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Diamond Schmitt join Guelph project team

Diamond Schmitt join Guelph project team

Diamond Schmitt Architects have been included on the design team for a new mixed-use development

Windmill Development Group has been selected by the City of Guelph to partner on developing a One Planet Living community in the city about an hour west of Toronto in Canada. The new mixed-use, highly sustainable development will include two distinct residential buildings, a large public library, and prominent public plaza. Windmill’s architectural team for the Guelph project will be Diamond Schmitt Architects and DTAH, both with substantial experience and creativity in creating complete communities. “Diamond Schmitt is excited to be part of an architectural team that will lead a socially and environmentally sustainable new core development for the City of Guelph,” said Duncan Bates, Associate, Diamond Schmitt Architects. One Planet Living is a planning and sustainability framework developed in the UK by the firm Bioregional and is predicated on building communities where people can live happy and healthy lives within the resources of our One Planet. Its principles include sustainable food and water, zero carbon energy, zero waste, equity and economy. “Windmill has a long history of leading the most progressive sustainable mixed-use communities in the country through innovative design, development and finance practices,” said CEO Jonathan Westeinde. “The Baker Street development represents a tremendous opportunity to reinvigorate Wyndham Street North with new civic and cultural resources and a significant population of new residents,” added Megan Torza, partner at DTAH, whose firm will be handling landscape architecture and urban design, as well as architecture alongside Diamond Schmitt. The focal point of the new community will be a dramatic new public library design and prominent public plaza. Two distinct residential buildings – one on the north side and one on the south of a new public street, will provide approximately 275 residential units to support the City’s intensification goals. Nick Myall News editor

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Hundreds injured at Spanish festival collapse

Hundreds injured at Spanish festival collapse

More than 300 people have been injured, five seriously, after a section of wooden platform collapsed at an urban sports and music festival in Spain. According to the BBC the event had been packed with people watching a rap artist at the two-day O Marisquiño event in the north-west city of Vigo, in Galicia. Police have confirmed that there were no known fatalities. Witnesses reported scenes of panic as people - many of them teenagers - tried to scramble to safety. Some fell into the sea. Personal effects such as mobile phones and handbags were left scattered on the ground. Several emergency teams attended to the injured, and divers were sent into the sea to check that no-one was trapped beneath the structure. The incident happened shortly before midnight on Sunday as a crowd was listening to the Majorcan rap artist Rels B. According to eyewitnesses, the wooden platform gave way during the first song of the concert as Rels B, who had just started his performance, told the crowd to jump, local media report. "The floor [of the platform] dropped like a lift. It was a matter of five seconds," Aitana Alonso told a local newspaper. "It broke and we all fell. People fell on me. I had trouble getting out. I was trying to get out and skidded, my foot got stuck, in the water. I got it out. A boy gave me his hand and I got out. I felt paralysed and [then] I left. There was a girl with blood on her head." Earlier, the regional health minister, Jesus Vazquez Almuina, told local radio about the nature of the injuries people suffered. "These are provisional figures, patients are still being evaluated... The vast majority are light injuries for bruises. There are five hospitalisations, mainly broken bones and some head injuries," he told local radio. In a tweet (in Spanish), Rels B wished "strength" to the injured and advised anyone worried about friends or relatives to contact an emergency information point set up by festival organisers. The mayor of the city, Abel Caballero, has said there will be an investigation into the causes of the incident. According to the BBC it is not yet clear whether the platform collapsed because there were too many people on it, or because the structure itself was weak, or whether other factors were involved. O Marisquiño is a free festival taking place outdoors in Vigo in August, attended by some 160,000 visitors. It features various cultural activities, including concerts and gastronomy, and some 10 sports competitions - including skateboarding and mountain biking - over a three-day period. Nick Myall News editor

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Polish Vodka Museum opens in Warsaw

Polish Vodka Museum opens in Warsaw

Could Vodka be the new Gin?

As Gin fever runs through the UK with distilleries popping up on every street corner, so Poland with an established heritage in the spirit world, celebrates its long relationship with Vodka by opening what is claimed to be the world’s first Polish Vodka museum. The museum has been crafted out of the revitalized 19th century vodka factory complex. Warsaw based Nizio Design International studio is responsible for the design, interior design, museum exhibition and author’s supervision over the project. The museum’s location made the creators respect its specificity, historical context and conservation requirements, while applying the latest technological and exhibition solutions. The architects claim that the innovativeness and uniqueness of the project lies primarily in the materials used and technologies developed for the purposes of creation of the revitalized facility. The design by Nizio Design is based on the application of solutions strictly corresponding to the nature of the building, its history and use of recovery materials or materials equivalent to the ones applied in the past. In the project, top quality natural materials were utilized such as glass, steel, concrete or copper which was historically applied in distillation equipment. In the building of the former rectification plant, where the Polish Vodka Museum is located today, the original steel structure and elements of finishing and interior decoration have been preserved. The museum, it is claimed., affects all the senses – it not only tells a fascinating story but also lets it be heard, seen, touched, or even smelled and tasted. The exhibition is located in five galleries and presents the history of vodka production in Poland from the 15th century to the present day. The concept of the exhibition is based on the simultaneous use of multimedia and artifacts, including original distillery equipment and symbolically reconstructed age-old distillation devices, concrete vats or kilns. The consistency of the project concept is reflected both in the details and in the background elements of the exhibition – ceilings, walls, floors. The ceilings are finished with Wema gratings and oil tanned black perforated sheets. Some of the walls are refined with the traditional technique of concrete trowelling, while others were left with bricks typical of the 19th century complex. The floors are made of wood recovered from one of the Polish distilleries. The development of the architectural details required the team to carry out numerous analyses and tests in order to achieve the desired effect. The original piping elements, instruments, kilns and concrete stairs in the main staircase have been preserved in the entire facility. Michael Hammond Nick Myall is away.

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