WEDNESDAY 18 JULY 2018

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Gortemaker Algra Feenstra 

This city hall in Holland is constructed out of circles which creates a unique dynamic

Together with construction team Laanbroek Schoeman adviseurs, SWINN and Galjema, Gortemaker Algra Feenstra is designing Albrandswaard’s new city hall in the Netherlands. For the most part, the programme takes place in a single transparent space. It’s an innovative concept that shows the process of democracy as soon as you enter. The concept of the House of Albrandswaard resulted from an idea of a welcoming building with maximum transparency and openness. It’s a building with which citizens and employees can identify themselves and of which they can be proud, a building in which approachability and accessibility are of the utmost importance. ‘The crossroads’ of Rhoon The location is essentially at ‘the crossroads’ of Rhoon, next to the metro station and the Groene Kruisweg, connecting to the overpass between the mall and the castle. To optimise

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The latest link from the US to Canada

The latest link from the US to Canada

A new cable-stayed bridge has been lined up for the Detroit to Windsor crossing in North America

Canada and the USA are the world’s largest trading partners with $841 Billion worth of trade flowing between the two countries annually, and of this 25% crosses the river between Detroit and Windsor in Canada. It’s against this background that plans for a new Detroit River crossing have been unveiled. The Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA) has announced that a significant milestone has been met in the public-private partnership (P3) procurement process with the selection of Bridging North America as the Preferred Proponent to design, build, finance, operate and maintain the Gordie Howe International Bridge project. Bridging North America’s design will see it delivered as a cable-stayed bridge.  Commenting on this huge infrastructure project Dwight Duncan, Chair, WDBA Board of Directors said:  “This is an exciting time for WDBA and for communities on both sides of the border. The selection of Bridging North America as the Preferred Proponent is another step forward towards the start of construction of the Gordie Howe International Bridge – the largest infrastructure project along the Canada-US border and one which will stimulate the economies in Canada and the United States.”  André Juneau, Interim CEO, WDBA added: “The momentum continues with the selection of Bridging North America as our Preferred Proponent. Over 60 subject-matter experts undertook a rigorous evaluation process, putting in countless hours, to reach today’s decision. WDBA looks forward to the completion of the procurement process and to the start of construction later this year.”  Bridging North America was selected following a rigorous evaluation of the proposals submitted by the three Proponent teams invited to participate in the Request for Proposals (RFP) stage. The criteria evaluated included: project schedule management, the design and build approach, durability of the infrastructure, community benefits, operation, maintenance and rehabilitation plans, measures to ensure compliance with architectural criteria, and the robustness of the financing plan.  The technical and financial proposals were evaluated by subject-matter experts with extensive engineering and financial expertise and, as with the entire P3 procurement process, the evaluation was overseen by an independent fairness monitor who provided an independent opinion confirming the fairness, openness and transparency of the process. Over the coming months, WDBA will negotiate final contract details with Bridging North America. The cost of the project, design details and expected construction schedule will be announced publicly following financial close which is expected by the end of September, signaling the contract has been awarded and signed. The new Gordie Howe International Bridge will provide for redundancy at the busiest trade corridor between Canada and the United States with improved border processing and highway-to-highway international connectivity. It also addresses future needs and will provide six lanes to meet anticipated growth in traffic over the years to come.  The Gordie Howe International Bridge project will be delivered through a public-private partnership according to a set contract value and timeline. The project includes the Canadian Port of Entry, the bridge, US Port of Entry and I-75 interchange.  Construction of the bridge will begin in 2018.  Key members of Bridging North America include: ACS Infrastructure Canada Inc.; Dragados Canada Inc.; Fluor Canada Ltd.; AECOM; RBC Dominion Securities Inc.; Carlos Fernandez Casado S.L/FHECOR Ingenieros Consultores, S.A.; Moriyama and Teshima Architects; Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects, LLP. Nick Myall News editor

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FBM Architects get the greenlight in Barking

FBM Architects get the greenlight in Barking

This project in east London will provide hundreds of badly needed, new homes for local people at a range of rent levels and prices

FBM Architects have secured outline planning consent from the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham for our designs for the regeneration of the Gascoigne West Estate, an exciting 850 home development. The project will have a significant transformational impact on Barking Town Centre and  the architects have worked closely with Be First, the council’s regeneration company,  to ensure that the designs complement the neighbouring areas of Abbey Road and Gascoigne East; providing the optimum mix of housing and community services. Simon Fraser, Director at Fraser Brown MacKenna Architects, said: “We have taken a very sensitive approach to the site’s historical context connecting and improving the existing townscape to create an attractive people-friendly scheme for the long-term benefit of local communities.” The planners, who endorsed the £250 million project, agreed that the development would result in a much-needed regeneration of the 2.4ha low density area, providing significantly more and better-quality housing, in a mix of sizes, in a safer and healthier designed environment. Pat Hayes, Managing Director of Be First, which is leading the project, said: “We aim to surpass the quality and design standards that we have set at Gascoigne East, offering hundreds of badly needed, new homes for local people at a range of rent levels and prices. This is a huge milestone for this exciting project, which will make much better use of the space, with more traditional street patterns and green spaces.” Councillor Cameron Geddes, Cabinet Member for Regeneration and Social Housing, said: “It is fantastic to see good quality proposals being drawn up that capture a mixture of realistic renting and affordable buying opportunities for local residents.” A further planning application is expected in late 2018 with the work on site estimated to begin in 2019. Nick Myall News editor

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An energy efficient future

An energy efficient future

The Portman Estate have sensitively refurbished a Grade II listed building to the Passivhaus EnerPHit standard, the highest energy efficiency standard for refurbishments in the world

Tucked away behind 21 Gloucester Place in London sits 2 Gloucester Place Mews, a modest listed building constructed in the early nineteenth century as a rear mews to the esteemed Gloucester Place. The Portman Estate has displayed its innovative approach to refurbishment and sustainability by sensitively retrofitting the building, which is Grade II listed, to Passivhaus standard. The Passivhaus standard was developed in Germany in the early 1990s and is a rigorous, voluntary standard for energy efficiency in a building. 2 Gloucester Place Mews has been retrofitted to Passivhaus EnerPHit standard – a subcategory within the Passivhaus standard that is the highest energy efficiency standard in the world for refurbishments. This standard far exceeds current UK building regulations, which could take years to catch up to Passivhaus technology. Aside from being one of London’s most energy efficient homes, 2 Gloucester Place Mews offers its residents a tranquil escape in the heart of the city. The home comprises three en-suite bedrooms, including a spectacular master bedroom with an enormous walk in wardrobe; a spacious, open-plan living area, large kitchen and private garage complete with charging point for an electric vehicle Only a handful of buildings in the UK’s private rental sector have been refurbished to this standard, providing a unique opportunity to secure a sustainable, historic home in one of London’s most prized locations. As well as supporting the environment, those who live in a Passivhaus have reported experiencing a better night’s sleep due to the excellent indoor air quality in Passivhaus buildings. The excellent indoor air quality also improves general health, quality of life and wellbeing. Michael Jones, Projects Director, The Portman Estate says, “The Portman Estate is committed to tackling environmental and sustainable issues affecting those living and working in the area or visiting for leisure or business. Passivhaus offers a ‘fabric first’ approach to low energy buildings, with the core focus being to sustainably reduce the demand for space heating and cooling. Consequently, carbon emissions from 2 Gloucester Place Mews are calculated to be reduced by at least 75%.” Gloucester Place Mews, Building Features: Walls are insulated with a 40mm aerogel blanket used in spacecraft engineering. This ‘blanket’ insulates external walls to reduce heat loss and gain to a minimum; keeping the building warm in winter and cool in the summer. The membrane also acts to exclude any draughts Wall membrane and triple glazing keep noise to a minimum and ensure thermal comfort  Building features mechanical ventilation to ensure that clean air is circulated throughout the building The ventilation system and cold-bridge free design eliminates damp, draughts, dust or pollutants Features a charging point for an electric vehicle and low energy LED lighting Energy bills are estimated at a couple of hundred pounds a year as little energy is needed for heating The building has a BREEAM ‘Excellent’ – The world's longest established method of assessing, rating, and certifying the sustainability of buildings Nick Myall News editor

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IN BRIEF

The 100-year life: the role of housing, planning and design

Experts call for integrated approach to housing, planning and design t

RedBook Agency offers clients a new way to source suitable architects and landscape designers

A new service linking architects and designers with potential clients

BDP APPOINTS THREE PRINCIPALS

BDP has appointed three new principals who will join the company&rsquo

EVENTS

26.05.2018 

Collateral event of 16th International Architecture Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia 
La Biennale di Venezia - Hong Kong Exhibition 6 May – 25 November, 2018 

Woods Bagot toasts Queensland success

Woods Bagot toasts Queensland success

The new Queensland Government HQ boasts a host of innovative features including façade sunshades that improve sustainability

Woods Bagot's compelling new workplace for the Australian Queensland Government co-locating nearly 5,000 people from 16 sites and 20 government agencies into a single, ‘connected’ location, has celebrated its first year of occupancy, with the building's property manager affirming "happy occupants" a measure of its design success. It was also commended by the Australian Institute of Architects at the Queensland Architecture Awards (interior architecture category) earlier this month. The 41-storey building accommodates the Queensland Government Executive and ministerial offices and numerous government departments. As well as making significant savings through the efficient co-location of public servants, there was an intention to foster and support a culture of change across all departments and the workforce. The potential benefits were numerous: greater collaboration and interdepartmental interaction, happier people, improved productivity, coordinated delivery of government services, and the ability to compete with the private sector to attract and retain the highest calibre talent. Driven by the principles of best practice workplaces, the interior design led an integrated approach that informed the building's architectural form. The response supports the organisational shift from government to corporate, with a large scale plate connected across three-floor villages that results in an efficient and highly productive workplace for team members focused on achieving the best outcomes for the people of Queensland. Encouraging transparency and collaboration, the workplace interior strategy was designed around a central core that allows daylight to flood the floorplate while capitalising on 360 degree views. Social spaces and agile, open plan collaboration spaces enhance employee connection and collegiality. Connectivity on and between floors was a key driver to fulfilling the brief. The integrated fitout is arranged around a series of vertically stacked three-level atria (villages) that form a series of community sky gardens functioning as informal working hubs and the social space for each of the floor plates. Wider corridors –designed as laneways through the core – allow for easy movement across the floor plate. They also accommodate integrated breakout spaces which give opportunity for chance encounters to extend into impromptu collaboration. Woods Bagot principal Bronwyn McColl described the significance of floor plate and spatial planning to provide an efficient and highly productive workplace environment revolutionising how the Queensland public service works. "The dynamic of the workplace was analysed and tested against efficiency and user experience criteria. Social, collaboration and meeting spaces are centralised around the atrium to encourage greater interaction, hierarchies are minimised and the things that make us feel good – natural light, plants, views out of the building – are maximised. "It's the expression of a simple idea. We wanted people to enjoy coming to work and to become more productive, which also feels more satisfying. When you give people great facilities to work in and share, they take pride in their workplace and there are undoubtedly better outcomes for the state," said Ms McColl.  The project benefited from a great state sponsor driving the vision and allowing boundaries to be pushed with the fitout, although it took some time. A year, in fact, of testing and pushing of boundaries to come up with the final brief. The flexibility and forethought in the design provides a design legacy that allows the public service to move to a fully agile environment in the future. "The State knew what they wanted to achieve, but not how. A real challenge was shifting the Queensland public service so far from where it was to set this new benchmark in line with general commercial spaces," said Ms McColl.  Interiors scheme brings the outside in The overarching design concept for the interiors is informed by biomimicry – a design approach that examines nature’s design methods to generate new spatial solutions. Biomimicry techniques were applied to develop colour, pattern, texture and structure creating a unique and dynamic interior experience. Dedicated themes and visual markers are based on naturally occurring phenomena and are used to demarcate space as a means of wayfinding. Indoor landscaping has been incorporated to activate and ‘green’ central gathering points from which informal gathering spaces lead into collaborative work zones and meeting rooms. Drawing on the surrounding and broader Queensland landscape, the interiors scheme brings the outside in with the application of natural colours, materiality, patterns and texture. The sandstone walls of the lobby reference Parliament House while the QUT forecourt inspired the stone ground floor foyer which floats as a continuous ground plane from the outside in – it's a modern interpretation sympathetic to the need to create a place to stand the test of time. Building on a neutral base palette and spotted gum timber, each level of the building takes different cues from the right across the state’s diverse native flora and fauna. The floors are created as visual markers, bringing people to an identifiable floor where a sense of ownership and place is enhanced. Comprehensively sustainable John McBeath, JLL's property manager, commends 1 William Street as a great building to manage and one that has outstripped its sustainability performance goals in under 12 months. "A building that works well operationally is one that has happy occupants, and 1 William Street works well in both those regards. "In a relatively short space of time, the building was achieving performance in energy and water use well beyond the original design targets, which is a reflection of the good design and the occupants who are using the building well," Mr McBeath said. One William Street is Brisbane’s newest 6 Star Green Star premium office tower achieving an As Built v3 6 Star Green Star rating to complement the building’s existing 5.5 Star NABERS energy rating. The rating represents 'World Leadership' in environmentally sustainably building practices. Innovative features that contribute to its impressive sustainability performance including façade sunshades that vary depending on aspect and sun exposure, automatic blind controls, LED lighting throughout the office areas, rainwater and condensation collection for landscape irrigation and lift energy regeneration. Dominating the Brisbane skyline, the building is a distinctive emblem for the city positioned within an invigorated public realm and mixed use lifestyle precinct that connects the CBD to the Brisbane River. At ground level, the building is lifted so that it appears to float over a dynamic network of pedestrian and view corridors that connect the site to its surroundings. The form of the tower is angled away from the Brisbane CBD; it sits sensitively within the immediate CBD context while looking west towards inland Queensland, symbolising inclusion and an ethic of an open, engaged and progressive public service. Nick Myall News editor

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Lift off for UK spaceports

Lift off for UK spaceports

A number of spaceport sites have been lined up for development in the UK

The A'Mhoine Peninsula in Sutherland in northern Scotland has been chosen as the most suitable place to locate the UK’s first spaceport. The UK Space Agency is giving Highlands and Islands Enterprise £2.5m towards the development of the facility from which rockets will be launched vertically to put satellites in orbit. According to the BBC, HIE will work closely with a consortium that includes the American aerospace giant Lockheed Martin. The goal would be to have launches as early as possible in the 2020s. The Scotland money is part of a package of grants to foster UK launch capability that was announced by UK Business Secretary Greg Clark at the Farnborough International Air Show. He told the event: "We are one of the best countries in the world for the research, development, manufacturing and application of satellites - big and small. And when we see the expansion that is taking place, and the requirement that these satellites need to be launched into orbit - there is an obvious opportunity here for the UK and it must be grasped." Mr Clark detailed a total of £33.5m in grants from a reserved pot of £50m to help drive forward proposals. Lockheed will get the lion's share at £23.5. The company wants to bring the Electron rocket to Scotland. Currently, this vehicle flies out of New Zealand. A British version of the vehicle would have a propulsion unit and satellite dispenser developed and built at Ampthill in Bedfordshire, Harwell in Oxfordshire, and in Reading. Patrick Wood is Lockheed Martin's senior executive in the UK. "As a country we've not invested in launch vehicles since 1971 and Black Arrow, which put up the Prospero satellite. I'm really proud to be working with the Lockheed Martin team and our partners in delivering the the first launch from British soil," he told BBC News. HIE will develop the launch complex at A'Mhoine, with Lockheed using one pad, and a second pad likely to go to Orbex. This is a new company that has been developing a 17m-tall rocket out of the public eye. On Monday, however, the firm was very forward in discussing its plans, which have now been backed through a UK Space Agency grant to the tune of £5.5m. "We will be putting a new factory into Scotland where we will be doing the main production and integration of the vehicles. The vehicles will then be transported to Sutherland," explained Orbex CEO, Chris Larmour. "Internally, I don't think we realised just how big today is because we've been focussed on technical tasks. But this morning at the show, I think we're beginning to realise just how big a moment this is." The UK government has been considering the idea of home spaceports for a decade now, and has updated the legislation that would make them possible. While the headline news focussed on Scotland and the launch of rockets from the ground, £2m has also been released to further investigations into the siting of a "horizontal launch" spaceport as well. This would see a modified aeroplane leave a British runway, climb to altitude somewhere out over the ocean and then release a rocket that can put the satellite in orbit. A number of such systems are presently in development. The UK government has announced a new £2 million development fund for horizontal launch spaceports across the UK at sites including Prestwick in Scotland, Newquay in Cornwall and LLanbedr in Wales. The UK space agency says the space flight market was potentially worth £3.8million to the British economy over the next decade. Nick Myall News editor

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Atkins supertall tower tops out

Atkins supertall tower tops out

The Atkins-designed Landmark 81 reaches full height in Vietnam as Ho Chi Minh City’s rapid development gathers pace

The Atkins designed Landmark 81 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, has topped out at the height of 461.2 metres, marking a significant milestone for the tallest building in Vietnam and Southeast Asia.  It is also one of the tallest buildings in the world.  Bertil de Kleynen, Sector Director for Asia Pacific said: “It’s extremely exciting to see another award-winning design from Atkins become reality and define the emerging skyline of Ho Chi Minh City. It places this vibrant city on the world stage.  Landmark 81 also becomes a proud member of the Atkins family of city icons, such as Dubai’s Burj Al Arab, Bahrain’s World Trade Centre, Shenyang’s Pearl of the North and Mumbai’s Namaste Hotel.” Atkins’ project scope includes architecture and landscape design. The 81-storey development is located in Vinhomes Central Park - one of the most prime locations in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Its frontage faces the scenic Saigon River, and is conveniently connected via major road and water transportation. Featuring a modern and unique architecture design that symbolises the diversity and fast-emergence of Ho Chi Minh City, this mixed-use development involves space for hotel, serviced residential apartment and retail. At the base of this skyscraper is a contemporary shopping centre featuring luxury retailers under one roof for a top-class shopping experience. The 241,000m2 development will feature contemporary landscape design that merges natural beauty into the building. The supertall tower was crowned with the “World’s Best Architecture” award at the International Property Awards 2017 held in London. It also picked up the “Best International Residential High-rise Architecture” and “Best Residential High-rise Architecture Asia Pacific” awards,  and  “best residential high-rise development Asia Pacific” and “best international residential high-rise development” at the International Property Awards 2016. In addition to Landmark 81, a number of Atkins’ award-winning projects are completed or due to complete, including the Cocobay Twin Towers in Danang, the Ocean Empire in Xiamen, the Huarong Tower in Zhuhai and the Songjiang InterContinental Hotel, also known as the “Quarry Hotel”, in Shanghai. Nick Myall New editor

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Blue is the colour in Utrecht

Blue is the colour in Utrecht

This new neighbourhood in Utrecht is inspired by a focus on mobility, healthy diet, community and meaningfulness & relaxation

The Cartesiusdriehoek in Utrecht in the Netherlands, a former marshalling yard of the Dutch Railways, is set to  be transformed into the first urban blue zone. The masterplan developed by Mecanoo for this new residential neighbourhood with 2,600 homes, a large central park, a school, a supermarket, catering and various other facilities is inspired by a scientific theory about areas around the world where people live longer, healthier and happier lives, the so-called blue zones. The area is set to become the most healthy, well-connected to public transport and bicycle-friendly neighbourhood in the Netherlands. Blue Zones  The blue zones are five areas around the world – Okinawa, Nicoya, Loma Linda, Sardinia and Ikaria – where many residents live exceptionally long and healthy lives. These zones attracted international attention when they were featured in a 2005 National Geographic article titled “The Secrets of a Long Life”, written by Dan Buettner. Investigations about the residents’ habits that had positive health effects found nine common characteristics. These nine healthy habits have been translated into four urban design themes for the new neighbourhood in Utrecht: mobility, healthy diet, community and meaningfulness & relaxation. CAB building as epicentre The eye-catcher and epicentre of the ‘Blue District’ neighbourhood will be the historic CAB building (1949). Its new infill will relate to the blue zone themes. A Food Hall with healthy catering facilities and restaurants traverses the CAB as a green street and forms a connection with the Cartesiuspark, the green heart of the neighbourhood. The diversity of functions in the transparent plinth activates the area on all sides of the building, making it an attractive meeting place for residents. On top of the CAB is a nine-storey apartment complex. With its undulating balconies it forms a striking contrast with the rectilinear substructure. Well-connected and bicycle-friendly  Blue District will become a lively urban neighbourhood with abundant greenery. All urban amenities will be easily accessible; walking and cycling will be the main modes of transport. Emphasis has been placed on sustainability, innovative energy solutions and sustainable (shared) mobility. The neighbourhood offers a variety of housing typologies for diverse target groups, with about a quarter of the units intended for rental social housing.  Nick Myall News editor

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100 Leadenhall heads for the heights

100 Leadenhall heads for the heights

The City of London’s third tallest tower is set to rise in the UK

The SOM designed 100 Leadenhall Street was awarded planning consent on 10th July. This leads on from the planning submission in January 2018, following SOM’s appointment in 2016 after a design competition between five renowned architectural teams.  At 263.4m AOD the building will be the third tallest in the City of London and falls within the City’s eastern cluster. Providing over 1.3M sf GEA of office-led development, the project is thought to be the last significant development opportunity in the cluster. The tower adopts a tapered form to ensure that the impact on significant views of St Paul’s Cathedral from Fleet Street and other key London views are respected and incorporates a richly articulated façade incorporating a diamond glazing pattern. The building places sustainability to the fore and targets BREEAM Excellent alongside other carbon and energy saving strategies. Leadenhall Street’s buildings are predominantly stone and the building embraces this with limestone elevations at its base. At ground floor, a number of new retail spaces are provided and new pedestrian routes linking Leadenhall Street to St Mary Axe and Bury Street. The proposals incorporate three new distinct public spaces, an open courtyard at the south entrance, new open space at the north entrance linking to the wider public realm network and reinstates the churchyard to the east of the adjoining Grade I listed St Andrew Undershaft, providing an additional 10,000 sf of public open space. In addition to the new public routes through the site, a double-height through-lobby is provided, allowing access from both north and south approaches. A separate entry provides direct access to a freely accessible viewing gallery that offers 360° views at Level 55 and a dramatic three storey view to the south, east and west at Level 56. The building will contribute to the continued development of the City as the world’s pre-eminent financial market and act as a catalyst for future growth. Commenting on the project Kent Jackson, Design Partner at SOM and WAN AWARDS judge: “The City of London is a unique combination of heritage assets with some of the most internationally recognised buildings of the 21st Century. SOM is proud to be a part of this architectural legacy. Our approach is sympathetic to this rich historic context whilst designing a building that combines our architecture, sustainability and structural engineering sensibilities into a landmark design.” Nick Myall News editor

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Aiming for zero carbon in Calgary

Aiming for zero carbon in Calgary

The University of Calgary’s MacKimmie Complex designed by DIALOG is part of the Canada Green Building Council net-zero carbon building initiative to bring community wellbeing and climate change conversations to campus

Universities across Canada are eagerly anticipating the summer break. For the University of Calgary, this means work on the MacKimmie Complex and Professional Faculties Building Project designed by DIALOG can officially reach new heights. Designed to be a high-performance net-zero carbon building, the new complex comprises a fully renovated tower and block and a brand-new link that connects the two buildings by an atrium, all connected by a redesigned outdoor gathering space. The multi-year, multi-phase project will enhance pedagogical and administrative environments, accommodate growth, and strengthen the sense of place and community in the heart of the University of Calgary’s main campus. “This is one of the largest construction projects in recent campus history, so we are thrilled to be able to reveal to the campus community how the heart of main campus is being transformed with this project,” says Boris Dragicevic, associate vice-president, Facilities Development, University of Calgary. To bring the University of Calgary’s “Eyes High” strategic vision to life, design firm DIALOG has been selected for design architecture, mechanical engineering, and landscape architecture. The program for the MacKimmie tower and the new block and link includes large classroom spaces, generous open student study areas, and small group study spaces, to encourage easier movement and social interaction and collaboration within the space. “To accommodate an environment for education we asked ourselves how we can use design to participate in modern-day teaching and learning in a way that will go beyond technology and programming,” says Robert Claiborne, design architect and principal at DIALOG. “As one example of many, we are proposing a building skin that makes its energy-modelling systems tactile, or visible to the eye, as a way to make climate change conversations a permanent fixture in life on campus.” The MacKimmie Complex is one of the first-ever projects designed for certification with Canada Green Building Council’s new Zero Carbon Building Standard, Canada’s first green building program to make carbon emissions the key indicator for building performance. It is one of two projects by DIALOG, also signed into the AIA2030 Commitment, participating in the initiative. Tower construction began in March and continues through the summer until September 2019. Construction on the new block and link will begin in fall 2019 and continue until summer 2022. Nick Myall News editor

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