MONDAY 16 JULY 2018

SEARCH   
Subscribe to News Review free now
  • SEND US NEWS
  • WAN AWARDS
  • ECOWAN
  • SECTOR NEWS
  • METRO NEWS
  • Tech Spot
  • News in Pictures News in Pictures
WAN Jobs
News Review
Podcasts
WAN Urban Challenge
WAN Awards

Making waves at Birmingham Uni

Lead News

Hufton+Crow 

Birmingham University’s award winning sports centre is a key component of the city’s successful bid for the 2022 Commonwealth Games

Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands’ (LDS) new sports centre for the University of Birmingham has been named as one of two National RIBA award winners in the West Midlands, marking it as one of this years finest buildings in the UK. The building, already a recipient of a Civic Trust Commendation and a West Midlands Property Award was formally opened by Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal in March. It was a key component of the city’s successful bid for the 2022 Commonwealth Games where it will host Commonwealth squash, alongside Commonwealth hockey on the neighbouring pitches. In its first year Sport and Fitness has attracted more than 10,000 members and welcomes more than 1,000 school children each week for swimming lessons. The judges citation concluded, ‘Since opening, the centre’s membership from both university and town h

... read more

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson launch Pittsburgh plans

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson launch Pittsburgh plans

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson (BCJ) has unveiled designs for two new buildings at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in  Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Both projects, ANSYS Hall and TCS Hall, are designed for collaborative research and maker-based learning. The buildings will be utilized by faculty, graduate and undergraduate students across multiple disciplines, and underscore university-corporate partnerships. ANSYS Hall is designed to be a 36,000-square-foot, four-story facility for CMU’s College of Engineering. Funded by a gift from engineering simulation software company ANSYS, the project creates a hub for student making and features an indoor-outdoor maker-court for conceptualization and manufacturing of large-scale, functional prototypes. The building will also house the ANSYS Simulation Lab and research space, allowing ANSYS to serve as a direct resource to students and contribute to the cross-pollination of ideas. The project is scheduled for completion in the summer of 2020. Funded in part by a gift from Tata Consultancy Services, a global IT and business solutions company, TCS Hall will serve as a gateway  for those entering the CMU campus from Forbes Avenue. The 90,000-square-foot building will create a new ‘Student Collaboration Porch’ and house laboratories for computer science and mechanical engineering, a drone high-bay, flexible makerspace, an outdoor robot yard, and offices for CMU faculty and the TCS Collaboration Center. Scheduled for completion in spring of 2020, TCS Hall will serve as a keystone for development in the north of Forbes district. Both projects are led by Design Principal Gregory Mottola, FAIA, and Principal in Charge Kent Suhrbier, AIA. Mottola and Suhrbier are alumni of CMU’s School of Architecture and have contributed to many BCJprojects, both nationally and in Pittsburgh. “Collaboration and making are essential to what we do as architects, so we’re always interested in designing buildings that allow for this type of creative exploration and prototyping,” said Mottola. “We look forward to seeing the students at work in these spaces, and the results of their design thinking.” The two buildings add to the firm’s growing list of works for CMU, which includes Stever House, the nation’s first LEED-certified residence hall; the award-winning Software Engineering Institute; and the celebrated Robert L. Preger Intelligent Workplace, known as a ‘living laboratory’ for the study of workplace technology, which opened in 1994 and remains an international center for the advancement of sustainable building technologies today. Other notable BCJ projects throughout the Pittsburgh region include the Heinz History Center, Braskem (formerly Aristech) Headquarters, both High Meadow and the Barn at Fallingwater, and the recently Living Building-certified Frick Environmental Center. “We’re excited to build upon our firm’s legacy with CMU and the region,” said Suhrbier. “Especially during this exciting time in Pittsburgh, as the city reinvents itself as a leader in technology and maker-based industry.” Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Bupa Place shines at MediaCityUK

Bupa Place shines at MediaCityUK

The cutting-edge Bupa Place office building designed by Chapman Taylor at MediaCityUK completes

Construction work on Bupa Place in Manchester in the UK has completed. The new BREEAM Excellent Regional Operations Building for Bupa has been handed over to Bupa, with colleagues starting to move into the new space. The Chapman Taylor-designed building houses CAT B interior fit-out by ID:SR Sheppard Robson, delivered by a team which also included Morgan Sindall, Turner & Townsend and Colliers. Occupying a prominent waterside location adjacent to the award-winning MediaCityUK, the building is the largest single-occupancy building in Manchester, providing over 13,700m2 NIA of BCO Grade A office space over six floors. The new development brings together over 2,000 employees from three buildings in their first co-located environment. Chapman Taylor was commissioned by Peel Land & Property to design a bespoke office building for Bupa. Sustainability and wellbeing were at the core of the brief for Chapman Taylor’s building design and ID:SR’s CAT B fit-out, with fully glazed façades and a large central atrium and glazed rooflight above that creates light, open internal spaces and a vibrant working environment within. The central atrium, which is surrounded with collaboration and informal social space on each level, creates a connection between floors and is centred with a feature 5m-high Barringtonia tree. The building façade is designed to curve away from the waterfront, creating space for the high-quality external landscaping and waterside terraced areas and maximising views across the water. The design incorporates solar shading to the southern façades, creating a striking feature for the building. Chapman Taylor’s CAT A internal finishes included the central core areas, the feature atrium and the open-plan floorplates. ID:SR Sheppard Robson worked closely with the Bupa team for the CAT B interiors to develop a bespoke, biophilic design to help promote mental wellbeing – a palette of sustainable organic materials and recycled content has been employed throughout, helping to create a relaxing work environment. The ground floor provides flexible break-out workspace for use by employees and visiting clients, as well as a highly visible reception area, a 250-cover restaurant offering fantastic views over the Manchester Ship Canal, a café and facilities for cyclists. Circulation stairs are finished to a high standard and located in a prominent position on the façade to encourage employees to be active. The layout of work and social spaces also facilitates movement through the building, creating increased interaction and collaboration. The range of agile work settings and social spaces gives employees control over where and how they work. The majority of workspace is located on the upper floors, where open-plan offices are flooded with natural light, and which offer stunning views across the waterside. Client meeting rooms are positioned centrally to give views over the busy workspaces. There is also a wellbeing suite located on the fourth floor, containing a faith room, occupational health and a first aid room. The project was delivered by Main Contractor, Morgan Sindall. The professional team included Turner & Townsend, which provided pre and post-contract cost management and Employer’s Agent services for both the CAT A and CAT B works, and Colliers International, which acted as Development Manager, overseeing the various teams involved in the project on behalf of Bupa. Nick Myall News editor

... read more

A new chapel for New Mexico

A new chapel for New Mexico

The aesthetic and functional design of this unique chapel have been inspired by the mountainous landscape of New Mexico

A Chapel For New Mexico was designed by Michael Jantzen as a nondenominational place where people of any faith or spiritual philosophy could gather together in small numbers in New Mexico, for special ceremonies. The structure would be located near Santa Fe in New Mexico, USA where a large number of people are immersed in a wide variety of spiritual endeavors. The aesthetic and functional design of the structure was inspired by the mountainous landscape of New Mexico, and by the symbolism inherent in the ways in which the chapel is to be used. The painted steel, glass, and concrete structure consists of four large multilayered facades, each facing in a different direction, and reaching into the sky. This configuration is symbolically referring to chapel’s openness to all who will hopefully be inspired by its uplifting geometry. These facades are connected to the centre glass enclosed meeting space, with four large doors located at the centre of each of the glass walls. A large skylight is located at the centre of the roof of the enclosed space, with a circular chandelier hung below it. Attached to the floor of the chapel are eight benches that can accommodate up to 30 people. An elevated circular platform is located at the centre, which is used by a minister, priest, rabbi, or any other inspirational speaker. The designer of the Chapel For New Mexico hopes that its design will help to promote the idea of multiculturalism, inclusiveness, and tolerance.

... read more

IN BRIEF

RedBook Agency offers clients a new way to source suitable architects and landscape designers

A new service linking architects and designers with potential clients

BDP APPOINTS THREE PRINCIPALS

BDP has appointed three new principals who will join the company&rsquo

First ever Architecture Apprenticeships approved

Foster + Partners has chaired a Trailblazer Group of 20 architectural

EVENTS

26.05.2018 

Collateral event of 16th International Architecture Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia 
La Biennale di Venezia - Hong Kong Exhibition 6 May – 25 November, 2018 

Making a new connection in Amsterdam

Making a new connection in Amsterdam

UNStudio has designed the IJbaan Cable Car which will become Amsterdam's fast, green and future-proof public transport link

UNStudio has completed the designs for the IJbaan: Amsterdam’s future cable car, commissioned by the IJbaan Foundation (Stichting IJbaan). The IJbaan is a grassroots “Amsterdammer” citizens' initiative, snowballing from a crowdfunding campaign led by Bas Dekker and Willem Wessels started in 2015 and now supported by the Municipality of Amsterdam. Its goal is to create a new connection across the IJ by the 750th anniversary of Amsterdam in 2025. The one and a half km cable car line is a clean and quick public transport connection between two growing residential areas: Amsterdam-West and Amsterdam-Noord / NDSM. The design consists of three slender pylons and two stations: NDSM Marina on the North Bank and Minervahaven to the South. The cable car is designed flexibly, so that in the future the route can be expanded to include a third station, creating a connection to the Hemknoop, Sloterdijk Station or even Westergasfabriek and the Westerpark, depending on growth and need.  Unique Mobility The cable car track spans one and a half kilometers, and will take 4.6 minutes to complete a full journey at an average speed of 21.6 kilometers per hour. The passenger cabins have a capacity of 32 to 37 passengers, with additional bicycle cabins with space for 4 to 6 bikes. Commenting on the project Ben van Berkel said: “A cable car is an extremely sustainable public transport system. It is a very fast and green way of traveling, which is attractive for cyclists, commuters, students, residents and visitors. In Amsterdam you see a growing need for connections across the IJ, with the new metro and bridges. The city is growing enormously and such an 'air bridge' contributes to the development of the entire region. Transport by air also relieves the increasing pressure on traffic and the existing transport network on the ground. It is not only efficient but also fun. People are going to see and experience their city in a whole new way.”   Sculptural Masts To allow for large ships to pass along the IJ waterway, the towers vary in height, reaching 46 meters to 105 meters on either side of the water, and up to 136 meters in the middle. However, the towers are fully in line with the Dutch capital’s UNESCO World Heritage requirements. While enriching the Amsterdam skyline, the masts are not visible from the famous canal ring in Amsterdam’s city center.  The cable car’s three slender towers will allow the dense urban area of Amsterdam to expand, while being respectful of the city’s past. The form of the towers themselves directly reference Amsterdam’s robust industrial past of ports and ship cranes. Their sculptural form wading through the water strives to balance playfulness with elegance. Social Hubs The cable car stations are not only designed as transport hubs for pedestrians, cyclists and public transport streams to come together, but also as a destionation in themselves. The Minervastation is intended as a new meeting place for the growing Western neighborhood, creating a vibrant urban plaza on the water with resaurant and bar facilities. The NDSM Marine ststion on the opposite bank provides a transport hub for the blossoming cultural hotspot in the North, with a bus stop, bicycle parking and viewpoint. The cable car, as a form of transport, fits UNStudio's mission to develop architecture and urban design concepts that are future-proof, making the living environment healthier. The track also ties in with Amsterdam's ambition to be Europe's example for urban innovation, with a sustainable 'all electric' public transport system that is optimally linked to existing public transport modalities. Bas Dekker, founder of the IJbaan Foundation said: "It is expected that this fast and frequent connection between the West and North will not onyl have regular traffic, but will also have a positive effect on bicycle traffic as it connects existing networks on both sides of the IJ. The cable car provides an architecturally interesting addition to the city and the harbour view, contributing to the spread of tourism in the city." Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Big names gather for ‘Future Cities’ symposium

Big names gather for ‘Future Cities’ symposium

Southbank by Beulah has announced the ‘Future Cities’ symposium in Melbourne to unveil shortlisted designs for the $2 billion Southbank precinct project

As part of the Southbank by Beulah architecture competition, six teams comprising of the world’s leading architectural firms will present at the public ‘Future Cities’ symposium, to be held on Friday July 27 in Southbank, Melbourne, Australia. With record number of attendees expected, the symposium will be the first glimpse into the proposed designs for the $2 billion plus Southbank site, which will transform Southbank into a lifestyle precinct potentially comprising of residential, world class retail and department stores, a dedicated gourmet food & market precinct, a 5-star hotel, designated commercial spaces, and culture and public spaces – with hopes to attract global tech names such as Amazon, Google, Microsoft, Apple and Samsung to create an experiential technology hub. The six international firms to present include MAD Architects, MVRDV, OMA, UNStudio, Bjarke Ingels Group and Coop Himmelb(l)au alongside Australian firms, Fender Katsalidis Architects, Architectus, Elenberg Fraser, Woods Bagot, Cox Architecture and Conrad Gargett. The overarching theme of the symposium is ‘Future Cities.’ As the population grows and lifestyles change and evolve, so too does the need for considered development that is designed for current and future generations. A focus of the symposium will be discussing how architects, designers and engineers play an ever-important role in being able to shape communities and optimise lifestyles. Focusing on the six designs specific to the Southbank site, the symposium promises to be an engaging and insightful discussion, with crowds of 1,500 plus expected. Each of the six teams will have 20 minutes to present their concept to the audience as well as their vision and thoughts on ‘Future Cities’, with the winning design ultimately changing Melbourne’s skyline forever. Confirmed speakers to present include Brian Yang Partner of Bjarke Ingels Group, Wolf. D Prix co-founder of Coop Himmelb(l)au, Ma Yansong founder of MAD Architects, Winy Maas co-founder of MVRDV, David Gianotten Managing Partner-Architect of OMA and Caroline Bos co-founder of UNStudio. The ‘Future Cities’ Symposium will be held at 400 City Road Southbank in Melbourne from 1pm-4pm on Friday July 27 and alongside the speaker presentations, will include an immersive experience centred on Future Cities. Tickets are now available to purchase via www.southbankbybeulah.com The winning design will be announced in early August. Nick Myall News editor

... read more

A play between light and shadow

A play between light and shadow

The Keppel Cove Marina & Clubhouse project has recently been completed by UNStudio Asia

Designed by UNStudio, the new Marina at Keppel Cove is located in Zhongshan, in the Guandong Province of China and is situated on the banks of the River Xi. The 50,000 sq m masterplan for the project comprises a marina with direct access to the Xi River, a service building, high-end residential villas and the supporting infrastructure, such as the CIQP building, a bridge, roads and surrounding external dykes. Keppel Cove Marina is the first and only marina with a private port of immigration in all of China. Clubhouse The Marina clubhouse is designed to resemble the experience of being on a yacht, or a luxury cruise. On the one hand it forms a retreat where people can disconnect from their busy daily lives and enjoy tranquillity and relaxation. On the other, it offers excitement and activity, alongside opportunities to escape and explore. The spatial and architectural concept for the clubhouse is to create a strong identity at the heart of the development. This is achieved by staging identity points from the entrance towards the river. The journey from the main entrance over the bridge towards the clubhouse and the visibility of the water and boats is designed to create an arc of suspense. The Marina at Keppel Cove from UNStudio on Vimeo. A contrasting approach to visual impact and the maritime notion of bridging land and sea was employed in the design. Whilst from the land side a sculptural landscape builds up gradually as you approach the clubhouse, from the water side a distinct and open facade welcomes seafarers while casting a shimmering reflection on the water. The shape of the building (and the surrounding landscape) was derived and developed based on the main access routes to the clubhouse, in combination with the most attractive view lines. In a smooth transition, spaces radiate outwards in an organic fan shape, away from the main infrastructure node at the base of the ‘stalk’ (the bridge). The design outcome of the fan shape is also a wide building frontage that takes maximum advantage of the marina view, while at the same time fluently guiding different user groups to their various destinations. The landscape surrounding the building is designed and organised with respect to views of the surrounding environment: there are plateaus from which to experience and enjoy the river Xi and view points that connect people with the soft landscape of Shenwan. The architecture allows for these views to also be enjoyed by the public without infringing upon the privacy of exclusive users or residents. Funnels Large, open ‘funnel’ spaces cut through the building, whilst simultaneously forming vertical connections by means of staircases which allow access and strolling between the levels. The Funnels change the typical notion of the building from an obstacle to the waterfront to a liquid space which allows for a seamless transition through the building’s volume. They form a permeable layer for walking from one side of the clubhouse to the other without interfering with the building’s programme and as such aid in the organisation of the interior spaces. The funnel spaces enable views through the entire building towards the nearby yachts and the water. Framing the sight of these picturesque spots is highly important as it enables vistas from each point inside the building to either the yachts or the hilly landscape to the North East of the site. In this way the funnel spaces create a strong inside-outside relationship for the building. In warmer periods the funnels enable a constant gentle breeze to cool the spaces by means of natural cross ventilation. Commenting on the project UNStudio’s Ben van Berkel said: “The way the wind is guided through the building in order to cool down the interior is also metaphorically articulated in the design. Within the internal wind funnels, it is almost as though you can see the wind swirling around within the architecture that surrounds you.” Natural light entering through a large skylight and the East and West openings creates a comfortable atmosphere and offers a constant play between light and shadow. In these spaces wood panelling finishes reference the luxury yachts that are moored nearby - where the deck in many cases functions as a soft material contrast to the hard carbon fibre body of the vessels. Facades Alluding to the colours, materials and the craftsmanship employed in the skins of contemporary speedboats and yachts, the facade of the clubhouse consists of bronze coloured aluminium panels. Often used in naval architecture, this bronze hue highlights the softness and fluidity of the building’s geometry. On the waterfront the entire facade is glazed and built up with glass fins for structural support. This facade includes several balconies that provide vista points and shading to the glazed areas. The undersides of the roof and the balconies are clad with mirror finishes which resemble sparkling reflections on the water’s surface.   Interior As a hub for maritime lifestyle activities, the marina offers various amenities for social interaction, for business, leisure and wellness, with the clubhouse building housing numerous restaurants, a members’ area, spa, gym, ktv and guestrooms. Bridge The bridge provides the main access route to the clubhouse and the waterfront. Pedestrian and vehicle routes are separated with a strong focus on the experience of the pedestrians. The walking level is located below the vehicular path and therefore sheltered from the view, fumes and noise of the cars. The bridge incorporates several platforms to rest or linger and above the dyke the handrail of the bridge transforms into a seating area - with the handrail of the vehicular path functioning as the canopy. Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Studio Gang unveils Canadian plans

Studio Gang unveils Canadian plans

One Delisle will bring new urban improvements to the Yonge and St. Clair community in Toronto

Slate Asset Management has introduced Studio Gang’s design for a new block plan and mixed-used tower at the southwest corner of Yonge and Delisle in Toronto during a community consultation session at 55 St. Clair Avenue West. Jeanne Gang, Founding Principal of Studio Gang, presented the vision to local stakeholders, including members of the Deer Park Residents Group, Yonge & St. Clair BIA and the broader community. WZMH Architects are also collaborating with Studio Gang on the project and are the architects of record. Conceived as a new model for sustainable urban growth, One Delisle will bring broad-based urban improvements to the Yonge and St. Clair community through the infusion of new residential and retail uses. Located at an important transit node in midtown Toronto, the project aligns with Slate’s long-term vision to re-establish Yonge and St. Clair as a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly neighbourhood with thriving retail, welcoming open spaces and world-class architecture. "The proposed building at One Delisle is only one component of this project. Because of our holdings in the area, we’re in a unique position to take a holistic city building approach,” says Brandon Donnelly, Vice President of Development at Slate Asset Management. Slate has been acquiring property in the midtown neighbourhood since 2013 and currently holds ten properties, including all four corners at the intersection of Yonge Street and St. Clair Avenue. “One Delisle introduces a new approach to tower design in Toronto. We’ve brought the kind of outdoor spaces you usually find in mid-rise architecture to high-rise design,” adds Donnelly. “The building’s form was driven by two main considerations: a desire to respond to the local context and a desire to create comfortable and expansive outdoor space that can work in Toronto. Every residence in this building will have a generous terrace or balcony.” Rooted in the existing architecture of the neighbourhood, One Delisle aligns with the city grid at its base, as well as with storefronts along Yonge Street. The proposed design also retains elements of 1498 Yonge Street, preserving the community’s main street character. The generous setbacks on both Yonge Street and Delisle Avenue allow for wider sidewalks, increased sunlight at street level, and new fine-grained retail—all of which will create a more enjoyable pedestrian experience. Moving upward from its rectilinear base, the building gently transforms into a compact, sixteen-sided tower that dramatically reduces shadows on the surrounding streets and neighbourhood. This transition also responds to the site’s grade change and the bend along Yonge Street, which makes the location of One Delisle a view terminus and an ideal gateway to the Yonge and St. Clair community from the north and from other neighbourhoods in the city. The tower is designed as a series of eight-storey elements, which nest together as they spiral up the façade. The angled, alternating geometry allows for variously sized floor plates that result in unique conditions within the units, bringing a diversity of residential options to the mixed-use neighbourhood. Tuned to Toronto’s climate, generous planted terraces atop these elements and protected balconies within them extend outdoor living into the shoulder seasons. “The geometry of the façade, and the self-shading it provides, allows each living space to stay cool in summer, while also optimizing winter light,” says Jeanne Gang. “This gentle pitch frames indoor-outdoor connections on the balconies and terraces that spiral up the building in an organization inspired by organic growth and form.” Based in Chicago, New York, and San Francisco, Studio Gang is widely recognized for architecture that elevates the urban environment while cultivating beneficial connections among people and with their natural and urban environments. This ethos is visible throughout Studio Gang’s diverse portfolio, which includes Aqua Tower in Chicago, Folsom Bay Tower in San Francisco, and 40 Tenth Avenue along the High Line in New York—each of which emphasizes connections between people, the city and nature. One Delisle will be Studio Gang’s first tower in Canada and Slate’s first ground-up development in the area, signalling a unique collaboration that combines global experience and high design with a significant, long-term investment in the Yonge and St. Clair neighbourhood. As part of ongoing efforts at Yonge and St. Clair, Slate has sought out opportunities to improve the public realm in a variety of ways, from commissioning an eight-storey mural by a British street artist in 2016 to introducing the new Gensler-designed ravine bench along Yonge Street last summer. One Delisle presents an opportunity to continue this legacy: in parallel with the project, Slate is revitalizing and expanding the Delisle-St. Clair Parkette, in collaboration with Janet Rosenberg Studio, through the incorporation of existing surface parking in the area. “Community and city input is always a powerful tool in the design and planning process,” says Donnelly. “The proposed design has been influenced by some of the early discussions we had with city staff and the local Councillor, and we’re excited to begin a more public discussion of the project.” After debuting the design to the community, Slate will be making an official submission to City Planning. “We feel we’ve put forward a design that not only elevates the architecture discussion in this city but also maximizes community and public benefits. Now it’s time to talk about that publicly.” Nick Myall News editor

... read more

Doubling up in Sydney

Doubling up in Sydney

A youthful yet sophisticated contemporary family dwelling on the Sydney Harbour shore in Australia

Designed by SAOTA and set in a north-facing cove in Sydney’s vast natural harbour, the site borders a park and a public pier which juts out into the bay. This element forms one axis for the site whilst a pristine beach, directly in front of the site, forms another. From the principle park elevation that the new building appears as a collection of planes; a play on space, privacy and threshold. Graphite grey sail screens (made from “Kaynemaile,” a polycarbonate chainmail developed in New Zealand for the Lord of the Rings movies) are rigged just off the house providing privacy from the road. Timber cladding, plastered mass walls, a wood-clad soffit and the exaggerated cill of a bay window punched through the sail screens, are layered into further planes. This game creates depth in an otherwise linear façade and provides privacy whilst maximising light and views to the park. Set into this façade the stairwell is fully glazed; but wrapped protectively in a cloak of timber louvres. This gently curved outline contrasts with the surrounding crystalline box and mediates between the formal entrance and bedrooms above. Entry is at 90 degrees to the Bay, off the park. A ramp, edged by water, slopes gently up to the front door; the little rise adding to the sense of arrival. Here the “U” shaped plan of the house becomes clear; the entrance is a link between two wings, separated by an internal garden which, like an internal harbour, allows views through the spaces to the bay beyond. Seen from the courtyard a massive blank wall of the upper storey seems to weigh on the glazed levity of the ground floor, amplifying the bay view beneath it. The bayside wing of the house is one open plan space. Stairs, rather than walls, delineate the raised kitchen and family dining from more formal areas. These stairs extend seawards into the garden forming a line of axis drawing the eye out to the view and providing privacy from the public road alongside. The garden is raised above the towpath to provide additional privacy from the beach and to dissolve the distinction between the garden and bay from within. This is emphasised in the pool whose orientation and extension towards the water makes a clear connection between the two. An oversailing timber roof canopy connects the street side to the garden and the beach. It permeates the interior, presenting itself at odd moments, it protects and defines the collection of internal and external spaces composed beneath. From the water it is a defining motif; expressive of lightness, reflective of the sea and the canopies of the trees. From the street and bay view, the other predominant elevation of the house, the largely glazed lower story is lost below crisp white walls, black framed window boxes and sail screens. A large Lilly-Pilly tree was preserved and frames the street side of the elevation. Materials were carefully chosen to site the house; the use of wood, white walls and travertine floors reflect the seaside setting. Off-shutter concrete is used as a playful accent which, like the rendered walls, appears almost soft and textured in contrast to crisp folds of screen and aluminium. Architects, SAOTA, displayed their South African signature in this design with its sharp lines, light forms and the lush integration of nature which all combine to make the design feel at home in this special site. A playful character, the calculated blurring of boundaries and the fresh, layered composition bring into balance the domestic needs of a young family and the wow factor that this phenomenal site deserves. SAOTA’s sister company, the interior studio ARRCC, developed a refined décor palette to suit the home and complement the client’s artworks. As architects in association, TKD worked closely with the client, ensuring that SAOTA’s detailed design was delivered and a dream home realized. Their creativity, perseverance and commitment to design excellence was a key success factor. Lighting design by Point Of View and landscaping by Wyer & Co. combined with the dedication of main contractor, Horizon, to deliver a quality home with an exceptionally high level of finish. Nick Myall News editor

... read more

At one with Hilversum’s industrial past

At one with Hilversum’s industrial past

Mecanoo were inspired by the industrial heritage of this site in Holland and asa a result the area has a recognisable identity once again

With its characteristic industrial buildings, the former site of the Regional Energy Supply Company in Hilversum in the Netherlands has always had its own identity. The gasworks site was originally situated outside the city perimeter, but gradually became enclosed by residential developments. With the relocation of the gasworks, the opportunity arose to redevelop the site and give it a new name: Villa Industria.  Mecanoo created a masterplan for 357 homes – partly affordable housing, partly owner-occupied, small-scale businesses and sporting facilities. Inspired by the industrial heritage of the site, the area has a recognisable identity once again. Green environment The urban plan prioritises public space for pedestrians and cyclists. Recessed parking throughout the site frees up space for a green environment with water features and a centrally located park.  An eye-catching ensemble of three cylindrical residential buildings refers to the old gasometers which once stood on the site. The existing swimming pool has been reclad in brick, steel and glass, so it fits the aesthetics of the new building. Robust steel columns support a new sports hall and fitness centre which has been built on top of the swimming pool.  Modern homes with semi-circular roofs are situated on the site of a former warehouse with a similar shape. The buildings at the perimeter of Villa Industria have the same height as the surrounding residential area. The courtyards consist of private gardens with an intimate character. Coherence and diversity The architecture of Villa Industria has a harmonious materialisation, a sculptural design language, and industrial detailing. Cool materials, such as steel and glass are combined with warm materials like red to red-brown bricks with subtle relief.  The application of the same bricks for each building creates coherence, whilst variations in the brick sizes and masonry techniques, ornaments and special objects provide diversity. The details of each building refer to the particular history of the gasworks site and contribute to the industrial character of the new neighbourhood. Nick Myall News editor

... read more
Tenderstream
WORLD INTERIORS NEWS WAN URBAN CHALLENGE WORLD CITIES NETWORK

Sign up to News Review

Weekly news and features direct to your inbox

Thank you
for subscribing to
WAN News Review