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TUESDAY 20 FEBRUARY 2018

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WAN Awards

Zaha Hadid’s One Thousand Museum tops out

Lead News

Zaha Hadid Architects 

Zaha Hadid’s first and final residential skyscraper in the Western Hemisphere takes a major step towards 2018 completion

Developers Louis Birdman, Gregg Covin, Kevin Venger and Regalia Group along with New York-based Plaza Construction announced this week that the highly anticipated One Thousand Museum by Zaha Hadid Architects has topped out. The 62-storey tower with 83 half and full-floor residences marks the late Pritzker Prize winner’s first and final residential skyscraper in the Western Hemisphere. This milestone is paired with a rendering release of the amenity spaces, revealing new architectural details and further insight into Zaha Hadid’s vision. The project is on track for an early completion in late 2018. The developers celebrated this accomplishment and topped-out the structure with an elegant private event on the rooftop of the recently completed Frost Science Museum, located in the adjacent Museum Park which offers a direct view of One Thousand Museum and the Downtown Miami skyli

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WAN Urban Challenge Awards

WAN AWARDS London Ceremony: Thursday 28 February

WAN AWARDS London Ceremony: Thursday 28 February

The inaugural WAN AWARDS ceremony is just over a week away and there’s still time to book tickets for this prestigious event

Architects, designers and clients responsible for some of the best projects created across the globe during 2017 will gather at the London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square on the evening of Wed 28th February 2018.  We are thrilled to announce that the ceremony will be presented by Suzannah Lipscomb, historian, author, broadcaster, and award-winning academic.  Join us for a three course dinner, exhibition of shortlisted work, awards presentation, and to celebrate the architectural work of the world’s most talented and influential firms. At the event all the winners will be interviewed and photographed for content to be used following the event. The trophy presentations to the winners and highlights from the evening will also be captured on video with winner’s receiving their own video clip. Following the evening content from the event will be shared online across the brand promoting the shortlist, the winners and the event. A sample of some of the architects attending the inaugural awards ceremony at the London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square include: Arup Barr Gazetas  Patel Taylor Perkins and Will  Hamonic + Masson Associes Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects  SimpsonHaugh  UNStudio  WATG  White Arkitekter We look forward to seeing you on 28th February 2018 for what promises to be a must attend event. Click here for more details and to buy tickets  Nick Myall News editor

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Lighting up Richmond’s arts district

Lighting up Richmond’s arts district

Designed by Steven Holl Architects, the ICA is a gateway between university and city, anchoring Richmond in the USA’s vibrant arts district

Opening on April 21, 2018, the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University, USA, will be the first contemporary museum in Richmond, anchoring one of the city’s busiest junctures and vibrant arts district. Designed by Steven Holl the ICA will bring a vital new dimension to the research university, also serving residents and the global arts community. Spanning 41,000 sq ft, the building comprises fluid exhibition and programming spaces across its three levels, and is capable of housing a wide range of multi-media installations. Keeping with Virginia Commonwealth University’s emphasis on sustainability, the building incorporates state-of-the-art green technologies. Integral features of the building include a 240-seat auditorium, café, four green roofs, classrooms, art storage facilities, a fabrication workshop, a terrace and catering kitchen. About the ICA’s Design The open design of the ICA features dynamic exhibition and programming spaces that can be creatively activated to support widely varied forms of contemporary art. The glass walls and windows create continuity between the interior and exterior spaces of the building. On the first floor, a 4,000-square-foot gallery and café, bar, and concept shop radiate from the ICA’s central forum and frame an outdoor garden, which Steven Holl describes as the “Thinking Field,” that will be used for social gatherings and public programs. The first floor also features a state-of-the-art 240-seat auditorium for film screenings, performances, lectures, and other programs. The second floor includes two forking galleries and an adaptable “learning lab” for interactive engagement. It also includes a publicly accessible terrace, featuring one of four green roofs. The third floor features a gallery with soaring, 33-foot-high walls and houses one of the administrative suites and the boardroom. Additional staff offices are located in the building’s lower level, which also includes a lobby for visitors, art storage and preparation facilities, a fabrication workshop, a green room, the catering kitchen, and general storage. “We designed the ICA to be a flexible, forward-looking instrument that will both illuminate and serve as a catalyst for the transformative possibilities of contemporary art,” said architect Steven Holl. “Like many contemporary artists working today, the ICA’s design does not draw distinctions between the visual and performing arts. The fluidity of the design allows for experimentation and will encourage new ways to display and present art that will capitalize on the ingenuity and creativity apparent throughout the VCU campus.”  In keeping with VCU’s master sustainability plan, the ICA’s design incorporates state-of-the-art technologies and environmentally conscious design elements, and makes use of numerous natural resources. The pre-weathered, satin-finish zinc exterior of the Markel Center, which houses the ICA, includes interspersed clear- and translucent-glass walls and skylights that infuse the building with natural light and lessen the reliance on nonrenewable energy. These include the use of geothermal wells to provide heating and cooling energy for the building, and four green roofs to absorb storm water, offset carbon emissions, and maximize insulation. Native plantings include wood oats, little bluestem, Pennsylvania sedge, and goldenrod. Building materials include Virginia bluestone and custom glass cavity walls, designed to exhaust heat in the summer and harness it in the winter. The project is designed to meet LEED Gold Certification standards. The WAN Awards Civic Buildings category is now open for entries  Click here for more details  or email wanawards@haymarket.com Nick Myall News editor

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Dar lights up Old Street Circus

Dar lights up Old Street Circus

Old Street Circus would create another landmark circus and a useable space for Londoners

Dar has been longlisted for the prestigious redesign of the iconic Old Street Roundabout in London. Dar’s design is to create a diverse, vibrant landmark for London called Old Street Circus. The design reclaims the roundabout for the people of London to create a thriving, active, healthy, safe and inclusive urban community green space that draws in, connects and captivates, giving people good reasons to visit. Old Street Circus would create another landmark circus in London. The transformation into a genuinely useable public space creates scope for hosting a wide-range of public and commercial activities and services, generating revenue for reinvestment in the progressive enhancement of the space.  The outer circular screens allow information to be displayed dynamically, depending on time of day, season, and occasion, the inner screen can display separate information or imagery from the outer screen. The screen is flexible and can be used for community and arts events. A new station entrance will be celebrated as part of the proposals, while key views to Old Street are opened up and historic buildings are created and the illumination of the space creates a safer environment. A green heart of Old Street Circus with new trees and planting. Commenting on the designs Robyn Gilmour, Head of Marketing and Business Development for Dar, said: “We are thrilled to be longlisted for the prestigious redevelopment of Old Street Roundabout which focuses on delivering public space back to the people of this great city”. Nick MyallNews editor The WAN Awards Future Projects category is now open for entries  Click here for more details  or email wanawards@haymarket.com  

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IN BRIEF

David Chipperfield Architects Works 2018

An exhibition at the Basilica Palladiana, Vicenza, Italy. 12 May &ndas

Darling Associates expands leadership

Following the studio’s continued strong performance, Darling Ass

Woods Bagot Announces New China Head

Stephen Jones has been appointed Regional Executive Chair, China, for

EVENTS

22.02.2018 

Annual Architecture & Design Film Festival 
Annual Architecture & Design Film Festival Washington D.C. from February 2 

12.03.2018 

Facade Tectonics 
BEYOND THE DIALOGUE SKINS on Campus: Bridging industry and academia in pur 

20.03.2018 

Planning for High Density Housing 
The population of most of our major towns and cities is rising rapidly, put 

Reinventing an industrial past

Reinventing an industrial past

This new affordable housing scheme in Walthamstow pays homage to the area’s industrial past

A new housing scheme on Sutherland Road in Walthamstow, north east London, has recently completed, providing 59 affordable homes, and features a shared communal garden and health centre. Developed by L&Q and designed by Levitt Bernstein, the project has transformed a derelict industrial site into a new residential community. The scheme takes the form of a courtyard, with larger, four or five storey buildings to the south and east, falling to smaller, two storey mews houses at the west and a two storey health centre to the north. The aesthetic takes its cue from the industrial setting.  The street elevation is wrapped in brick with a ‘random’ pattern of windows and balconies. Regular holes punched through give views of the courtyard, whilst the distinctive, irregular saw-toothed roof creates a sense of individuality. In contrast, the mews houses have a more traditional form, with steeply pitched roofs to reinforce the module of individual dwellings. This is offset by the chosen material: striking red corrugated metal cladding, again playing on the surrounding industrial context and giving these houses a strong identity. Notably, all homes, whether one or two bedroom apartments or three bedroom mews houses, are affordable and dual aspect. In order to future proof homes, roof spaces within the mews houses have been built with staircases and insulation already in place, allowing easy adaptation for the provision of additional bedrooms. Tony Harker, Sales and Customer Service Director at L&Q, said: “We are delighted with this scheme – not only does it provide much-needed, high quality, affordable homes for local people, but it is a striking addition to the streetscape that has been a catalyst for the wider regeneration of the area.” The landscape plays a crucial role in unifying the scheme.  The colour of the mews homes spreads through the central courtyard space through the use of innovative recycled glass paving units and red planting species such as scarlet tulips, red sedums and berrying shrubs. A variety of environments are provided for residents, from formal lawns to a toddler’s play area. This space is designed to encourage informal use, whilst responding to the site’s industrial heritage by featuring small timber trains sat on inlaid steel ‘tracks’. A three storey opening in the south western corner of one of the apartment buildings creates a communal terrace on the second floor, providing relaxed amenity space with immediate views over the courtyard and beyond to the reservoirs further west. This opening also allows light to penetrate deep into the site, meaning the courtyard benefits from sunlight even in the darkest winter months. Gary Tidmarsh, Chairman at Levitt Bernstein, said: “The aesthetic of the new homes on this small site deliberately challenges the traditional vernacular of those nearby, and by doing so, reinvigorates and makes a substantial contribution to the transformation of the area.” Nick MyallNews editor The WAN Awards Residential category is now open for entries  Click here for more details or email wanawards@haymarket.com    

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David Bernstein - 24 June 1937 - 21 January 2018

David Bernstein - 24 June 1937 - 21 January 2018

David Bernstein, a pioneer of high density social housing, has passed away aged 80

David Bernstein, who has died aged 80, was one of five assistants who worked for the architect Patrick Hodgkinson on the design of the Brunswick Centre, near St Pancras station, London. The project was the first large-scale scheme that proved that housing could be built at high densities without tall tower blocks. According to the Guardian, it was initially planned as luxury shops and flats; Bernstein’s task in 1966 was to adapt the flats as low-cost housing for the London borough of Camden, after the developer miscalculated the rental income. A fellow assistant was David Levitt and the two architects resolved to practise together. As an American who had arrived in London in 1964, he saw through fresh eyes the problems of neglected, overcrowded properties in the city. In the Notting Hill area the poor quality housing was the legacy of the local agent Peter Rachman and it had a major  impact on Notting Hill’s West Indian community. Bruce Kenrick had been similarly moved in 1963 to form the Notting Hill Housing Trust, whose chief executive, John Coward, encouraged Bernstein to contact another new charity, Shelter, launched at the moment when Ken Loach’s television play Cathy Come Home brought Britain’s housing crisis to public attention. Bernstein founded the Circle 33 Housing Association with Levitt and their wives in 1968, and used his architectural talents not to build eye-catching designs like the Brunswick Centre but to create good, cheap homes, mainly through conversion work following a grant from Shelter. For its first six years, the architectural practice Levitt Bernstein (also formed in 1968) concentrated on social housing for Circle 33. “We found there were too many clients between us and the people who were to live in the housing we were doing, and we wanted to get closer,” Bernstein explained in 1977. The Housing Subsidies Act of 1967 had made it slightly easier for housing associations to get government grants, and Bernstein and Levitt spent their time surveying and converting Victorian houses, and managing their rents. Bernstein’s beliefs owed something to Jane Jacobs, whose The Death and Life of Great American Cities in 1961 challenged the rebuilding of great cities with modern blocks (exemplified by the Brunswick Centre), and more to his experience of inner London, blighted by a planned motorway “box” or redeveloped with blocks that ignored their residents’ needs. The reaction to modernist orthodoxy reflected the radical zeitgeist of 1968. Circle became one of Britain’s largest housing associations, since 2016 part of the Clarion Housing Group. The Levitt Bernstein practice was a conventional partnership but profits were shared. In encouraging egalitarianism, Levitt and Bernstein recognised their own youth and inexperience and, explained Levitt, wanted to make it “a nice place to work”. Graduates arrived with portfolios of political tracts rather than drawings, but by 1977 they had 40 staff, including a high proportion of female architects. A scheme from that year was Hart Hill Lane, 33 sheltered flats for elderly people and 10 family homes in Luton. David was born in New York, the son of ambitious Jewish parents, Sol Bernstein, who worked for Miller Bros hats, and his wife, Diana. He read architecture at the University of Cincinnati before in 1962 he took Louis Kahn’s master class at the University of Pennsylvania. The same year he married Beverly Liden, an economist of Lutheran extraction whom he had known since high school. His parents were unhappy with the match and in 1964 the young couple determined on a fresh start and moved to London. They never returned. Both joined the staff of the Architectural Association, David to supplement his income working for William Whitfield and then Hodgkinson by teaching, while Beverly quickly rose to the rank of registrar and developed a new career as a planner. They were exceptionally close, with David retiring early to spend time with Beverly when in 2003 she was diagnosed with cancer. She died in 2012. He is survived by his brother, Edward, a niece, Lisa, and a grandniece, Aviva.

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Finding Nirvana at home

Finding Nirvana at home

The international design firm AGi architects have created a home on a grand scale in Kuwait

There are no words to define the concept of Nirvana, a mental state with effects in the physical and spiritual planes. This makes it difficult to explain and only those who practice meditation can understand how far they are from reaching it. These thoughts led AGi architects to name this project Nirvana. Words like “house”, “villa”, or “palace” fail to represent the scale of the building, its materialisation, or its spatial order. The architects prefer the term “home”. The features of a home are not physical, but rather emotional and affective, and Nirvana Home has been designed and built to satisfy the needs of the inhabitants in these terms. This home is also a reflection of the culture within which it is developed. In this sense, its point of contact with the location at ground level is a public floor dedicated to socialisation, for the gathering of family and friends. With this purpose in mind, the spaces were designed to look at one another, detached from the surroundings and interconnected through a series of courtyards. The series of geometric voids in grey polished marble contrasts with the exterior's white rough ceramic finish. The duality of textures is similar to that found in a marble quarry, where the polished geometric voids contrast with the natural mountain terrain. Inside Nirvana Home, little by little, step by step, the horizon and the sea begin to dominate and the building is marked by a formidable diagonal that displaces matter so as to reach maximum transparency, allowing rooms on different façades to look towards the sea. This strategy generates a string of empty spaces that become three-dimensional courtyards holding gardens at different heights and acting as shared spaces for parents and children. The last floor of Nirvana Home is where the private spaces are found, for the exclusive use of the parents who, from this privileged position, are able to preside over the indoor activities of the home without losing sight of the sea and the horizon. Nick Myall News editor

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Amphitheatre meets bridge on Kalix River

Amphitheatre meets bridge on Kalix River

Described by the architects as "a hybrid between an amphitheatre and a bridge” this structure will be a transport link as well as a place to watch the river flow...

The Swedish Traffic Administration has commissioned Erik Andersson Architects to design a proposal for a new bridge over Kalix River in Sweden. More than a mere crossing, the proposed bridge introduces a new public space where people can enjoy the sun and get closer to the water. It will also provide shelter from the elements thanks to a protected walkway. KBClip 08_000 from Erik Andersson on Vimeo.  The existing bridge over Kalix River will be replaced by a new one in 2019. As part of the initial design process, The Swedish Traffic Administration wanted to look into the possibility of introducing new features to the upcoming bridge, making it a central gathering place for the residents of Kalix. As a solution, Erik Andersson Architects came up with a proposal offering separate routes for vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists, as well as creating public spaces such as viewing platforms and seating areas. "The idea behind the bridge is to turn a simple crossing of the river into an experience and create a warm atmosphere. We also wanted to make it possible for people to get near the water surface and enjoy the view, while at the same time giving protection from the weather which can get harsh in this part of the country,” says Erik Andersson. "The bridge is a hybrid of an amphitheatre and a bridge. You can use it as you wish; sit down and watch the river and the view, pass under it by boat or simply cross it by foot or bicycle.” KBClip 04_000 from Erik Andersson on Vimeo. In the design, car and cycle lanes running on top of the bridge are separated from pedestrians below. The walkway is placed under the driveway, using the top as a roof and facing south in order capture the warmth of the sun.  This is Erik Andersson’s first project in Kalix, a municipality located in Norrbotten County in northern Sweden. The firm has previously designed bridges in Norrköping, Hammarby Sjöstad and Nynäshamn, and is currently working on a new bridge in Hagastaden, Stockholm, Sweden. "Kalix is a fantastic place, with a stunning archipelago and of course the best fish roe on Earth, the Kalix löjrom,” Andersson says. ”I’m hoping this bridge could become a new landmark project for the municipality and add to its unique character.” KBClip 01_000 from Erik Andersson on Vimeo. Nick MyallNews editor The WAN Awards Future Projects category is now open for entries  Click here for more details  or email wanawards@haymarket.com    

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Skipping from level to level

Skipping from level to level

A unique ‘skip floor plan’ gives this home in South Korea a distinctive look while making the most of a relatively small plot

From the architects… Designed by KDDH, the ‘Slow House’ is located in Ulsan, South Korea.  It is situated on a rectangular site facing the foot of Mt. Hwangbang. Since it is expected that there will be a lot of traffic and mountain climbers in the area, it was necessary to design a building which protects user privacy. Therefore, the design was started with the intention of separating a private area from a public area. First, the shape of the mass was decided as a form wrapping the space and embracing the nearby mountain. The lower part of the plot is used as a buffer zone where the private area and the public areas are separated. The inner space of this house is roughly separated into three hierarchies: a family area, children’s area, and a parent’s area. The staircase was used in order to clarify and connect these hierarchies. The family area located in the lowest part of the house includes a kitchen, dining room, and other elements for the purpose of family activity. In order to embrace various programs in a compact area, a ‘skip floor plan’ that is dislocated every half storey was planned instead of a traditional method that separates spaces using walls and furnitures. Using the skip floor plan a large volume of space compared to the size of the area could be obtained. Light flooding the centre of the building was utilised to fill the space. On the second floor, a study room and the first buffer area are found.  Through this study room a space where it is possible to look down the living room and communicate with each other was created. Also, it was planned that the children can pass through the family area by arranging the bedroom where such a formation can be seen. Each room has a small size, but, has a different shape of a ceiling to form a unique feeling of space. Again, the staircase leads you half story up to the second buffer area. The low corridor divides the space for parents and children, and it is also used as an approaching area for a bathroom. This area for the husband and wife is separated from other spaces at the highest location, but it is possible to access the children and family areas easily. In addition, an attic is located at the end of the staircase. The large-sized attic can be used as a separate space for children and guests.  The WAN Awards Residential category is now open for entries  Click here for more details or email wanawards@haymarket.com  

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Zigzag rooftops pierce the sky

Zigzag rooftops pierce the sky

This Canadian home sets itself apart with the striking contours of its angular rooftop

Negotiating the steep topography of a lake-side site, this holiday house, designed by Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster consists of two volumes stacked on one another. The lower volume nestles into the landscape so that it is barely visible as one first approaches the house. The upper volume rests on the lower one and on a concrete pier to form both a bridge and a cantilever. This massing strategy allows for increased access and permeability of the site and emphasizes the charged relationship between the building and the ground. The upper volume contains living spaces and opens up towards the lake while the lower volume is more enclosed and houses bedrooms. Responding to the need for accessibility for guests with disabilities, as well as thinking of the clients’ ability to use the building far into the future, a study/bedroom and accessible bathroom are provided on the main level. The roof of the lower bar becomes a terrace allowing elevated views and a direct connection to the living spaces. The factory-inspired skylights are rotated to admit north light without heat gain while orienting the solar panels due south so the house can generate all of its own power. The combination of vertical skylights and a fully glazed south-facing facade result in a generously daylit interior. A covered walkway shades the main wall of glass from summer sun while admitting lower winter sun to passively heat the dark-dyed concrete floor. Simple, low-maintenance, long-life materials are used on the facade, including a reflective standing seam metal roof and a lapped heat-treated (petrified) wood cladding, while the interior is lined with formaldehyde-free plywood. Playful elements are placed throughout from a glazed brick socle for the wood stove, to scattered colourful coat-hooks and a custom undercroft swing-bench. [Source V2com] Nick MyallNews editor The WAN Awards Residential category is now open for entries  Click here for more details or email wanawards@haymarket.com  

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WIN Ceremony

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