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A new chapel for New Mexico

Lead News

Michael Jantzen 

The aesthetic and functional design of this unique chapel have been inspired by the mountainous landscape of New Mexico

A Chapel For New Mexico was designed by Michael Jantzen as a nondenominational place where people of any faith or spiritual philosophy could gather together in small numbers in New Mexico, for special ceremonies. The structure would be located near Santa Fe in New Mexico, USA where a large number of people are immersed in a wide variety of spiritual endeavors. The aesthetic and functional design of the structure was inspired by the mountainous landscape of New Mexico, and by the symbolism inherent in the ways in which the chapel is to be used. The painted steel, glass, and concrete structure consists of four large multilayered facades, each facing in a different direction, and reaching into the sky. This configuration is symbolically referring to chapel’s openness to all who will hopefully be inspired by its uplifting geometry. These facades are connected to the centre glass enclo

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Lift off for UK spaceports

Lift off for UK spaceports

A number of spaceport sites have been lined up for development in the UK

The A'Mhoine Peninsula in Sutherland in northern Scotland has been chosen as the most suitable place to locate the UK’s first spaceport. The UK Space Agency is giving Highlands and Islands Enterprise £2.5m towards the development of the facility from which rockets will be launched vertically to put satellites in orbit. According to the BBC, HIE will work closely with a consortium that includes the American aerospace giant Lockheed Martin. The goal would be to have launches as early as possible in the 2020s. The Scotland money is part of a package of grants to foster UK launch capability that was announced by UK Business Secretary Greg Clark at the Farnborough International Air Show. He told the event: "We are one of the best countries in the world for the research, development, manufacturing and application of satellites - big and small. And when we see the expansion that is taking place, and the requirement that these satellites need to be launched into orbit - there is an obvious opportunity here for the UK and it must be grasped." Mr Clark detailed a total of £33.5m in grants from a reserved pot of £50m to help drive forward proposals. Lockheed will get the lion's share at £23.5. The company wants to bring the Electron rocket to Scotland. Currently, this vehicle flies out of New Zealand. A British version of the vehicle would have a propulsion unit and satellite dispenser developed and built at Ampthill in Bedfordshire, Harwell in Oxfordshire, and in Reading. Patrick Wood is Lockheed Martin's senior executive in the UK. "As a country we've not invested in launch vehicles since 1971 and Black Arrow, which put up the Prospero satellite. I'm really proud to be working with the Lockheed Martin team and our partners in delivering the the first launch from British soil," he told BBC News. HIE will develop the launch complex at A'Mhoine, with Lockheed using one pad, and a second pad likely to go to Orbex. This is a new company that has been developing a 17m-tall rocket out of the public eye. On Monday, however, the firm was very forward in discussing its plans, which have now been backed through a UK Space Agency grant to the tune of £5.5m. "We will be putting a new factory into Scotland where we will be doing the main production and integration of the vehicles. The vehicles will then be transported to Sutherland," explained Orbex CEO, Chris Larmour. "Internally, I don't think we realised just how big today is because we've been focussed on technical tasks. But this morning at the show, I think we're beginning to realise just how big a moment this is." The UK government has been considering the idea of home spaceports for a decade now, and has updated the legislation that would make them possible. While the headline news focussed on Scotland and the launch of rockets from the ground, £2m has also been released to further investigations into the siting of a "horizontal launch" spaceport as well. This would see a modified aeroplane leave a British runway, climb to altitude somewhere out over the ocean and then release a rocket that can put the satellite in orbit. A number of such systems are presently in development. The UK government has announced a new £2 million development fund for horizontal launch spaceports across the UK at sites including Prestwick in Scotland, Newquay in Cornwall and LLanbedr in Wales. The UK space agency says the space flight market was potentially worth £3.8million to the British economy over the next decade. Nick Myall News editor

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Atkins supertall tower tops out

Atkins supertall tower tops out

The Atkins-designed Landmark 81 reaches full height in Vietnam as Ho Chi Minh City’s rapid development gathers pace

The Atkins designed Landmark 81 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, has topped out at the height of 461.2 metres, marking a significant milestone for the tallest building in Vietnam and Southeast Asia.  It is also one of the tallest buildings in the world.  Bertil de Kleynen, Sector Director for Asia Pacific said: “It’s extremely exciting to see another award-winning design from Atkins become reality and define the emerging skyline of Ho Chi Minh City. It places this vibrant city on the world stage.  Landmark 81 also becomes a proud member of the Atkins family of city icons, such as Dubai’s Burj Al Arab, Bahrain’s World Trade Centre, Shenyang’s Pearl of the North and Mumbai’s Namaste Hotel.” Atkins’ project scope includes architecture and landscape design. The 81-storey development is located in Vinhomes Central Park - one of the most prime locations in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Its frontage faces the scenic Saigon River, and is conveniently connected via major road and water transportation. Featuring a modern and unique architecture design that symbolises the diversity and fast-emergence of Ho Chi Minh City, this mixed-use development involves space for hotel, serviced residential apartment and retail. At the base of this skyscraper is a contemporary shopping centre featuring luxury retailers under one roof for a top-class shopping experience. The 241,000m2 development will feature contemporary landscape design that merges natural beauty into the building. The supertall tower was crowned with the “World’s Best Architecture” award at the International Property Awards 2017 held in London. It also picked up the “Best International Residential High-rise Architecture” and “Best Residential High-rise Architecture Asia Pacific” awards,  and  “best residential high-rise development Asia Pacific” and “best international residential high-rise development” at the International Property Awards 2016. In addition to Landmark 81, a number of Atkins’ award-winning projects are completed or due to complete, including the Cocobay Twin Towers in Danang, the Ocean Empire in Xiamen, the Huarong Tower in Zhuhai and the Songjiang InterContinental Hotel, also known as the “Quarry Hotel”, in Shanghai. Nick Myall New editor

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Transparent and open

Transparent and open

This city hall in Holland is constructed out of circles which creates a unique dynamic

Together with construction team Laanbroek Schoeman adviseurs, SWINN and Galjema, Gortemaker Algra Feenstra is designing Albrandswaard’s new city hall in the Netherlands. For the most part, the programme takes place in a single transparent space. It’s an innovative concept that shows the process of democracy as soon as you enter. The concept of the House of Albrandswaard resulted from an idea of a welcoming building with maximum transparency and openness. It’s a building with which citizens and employees can identify themselves and of which they can be proud, a building in which approachability and accessibility are of the utmost importance. ‘The crossroads’ of Rhoon The location is essentially at ‘the crossroads’ of Rhoon, next to the metro station and the Groene Kruisweg, connecting to the overpass between the mall and the castle. To optimise the connection the building has been lifted to the level of the overpass. The entrance and all public amenities will be on this level. This leaves space on the ground level to provide not only a car parking facility, but the bicycle parking, facility rooms and technical rooms are situated there as well. A transparent staircase connects the ground floor with the entrance level and the roof level, which houses the office spaces for Stichting Welzijn Albrandswaard, the neighbourhood team, flex work stations and a rooftop terrace for the municipality. The current cafeteria at the side of the sports hall will be demolished and integrated into the new building on the first floor with a direct connection to the sports hall’s grandstand. Dynamic shapes The city hall is constructed out of circles. These circles have different radiuses, and because the centres of the circles are shifted relative to each other, this creates dynamics. They touch on one side, which creates space between the circular arches on the other side due to the difference in radius. As a result, this creates a covered outdoor area with a sheltered entrance as well as permanent awning on the south side. Nick Myall News editor  

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IN BRIEF

RedBook Agency offers clients a new way to source suitable architects and landscape designers

A new service linking architects and designers with potential clients

BDP APPOINTS THREE PRINCIPALS

BDP has appointed three new principals who will join the company&rsquo

First ever Architecture Apprenticeships approved

Foster + Partners has chaired a Trailblazer Group of 20 architectural

EVENTS

26.05.2018 

Collateral event of 16th International Architecture Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia 
La Biennale di Venezia - Hong Kong Exhibition 6 May – 25 November, 2018 

Blue is the colour in Utrecht

Blue is the colour in Utrecht

This new neighbourhood in Utrecht is inspired by a focus on mobility, healthy diet, community and meaningfulness & relaxation

The Cartesiusdriehoek in Utrecht in the Netherlands, a former marshalling yard of the Dutch Railways, is set to  be transformed into the first urban blue zone. The masterplan developed by Mecanoo for this new residential neighbourhood with 2,600 homes, a large central park, a school, a supermarket, catering and various other facilities is inspired by a scientific theory about areas around the world where people live longer, healthier and happier lives, the so-called blue zones. The area is set to become the most healthy, well-connected to public transport and bicycle-friendly neighbourhood in the Netherlands. Blue Zones  The blue zones are five areas around the world – Okinawa, Nicoya, Loma Linda, Sardinia and Ikaria – where many residents live exceptionally long and healthy lives. These zones attracted international attention when they were featured in a 2005 National Geographic article titled “The Secrets of a Long Life”, written by Dan Buettner. Investigations about the residents’ habits that had positive health effects found nine common characteristics. These nine healthy habits have been translated into four urban design themes for the new neighbourhood in Utrecht: mobility, healthy diet, community and meaningfulness & relaxation. CAB building as epicentre The eye-catcher and epicentre of the ‘Blue District’ neighbourhood will be the historic CAB building (1949). Its new infill will relate to the blue zone themes. A Food Hall with healthy catering facilities and restaurants traverses the CAB as a green street and forms a connection with the Cartesiuspark, the green heart of the neighbourhood. The diversity of functions in the transparent plinth activates the area on all sides of the building, making it an attractive meeting place for residents. On top of the CAB is a nine-storey apartment complex. With its undulating balconies it forms a striking contrast with the rectilinear substructure. Well-connected and bicycle-friendly  Blue District will become a lively urban neighbourhood with abundant greenery. All urban amenities will be easily accessible; walking and cycling will be the main modes of transport. Emphasis has been placed on sustainability, innovative energy solutions and sustainable (shared) mobility. The neighbourhood offers a variety of housing typologies for diverse target groups, with about a quarter of the units intended for rental social housing.  Nick Myall News editor

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100 Leadenhall heads for the heights

100 Leadenhall heads for the heights

The City of London’s third tallest tower is set to rise in the UK

The SOM designed 100 Leadenhall Street was awarded planning consent on 10th July. This leads on from the planning submission in January 2018, following SOM’s appointment in 2016 after a design competition between five renowned architectural teams.  At 263.4m AOD the building will be the third tallest in the City of London and falls within the City’s eastern cluster. Providing over 1.3M sf GEA of office-led development, the project is thought to be the last significant development opportunity in the cluster. The tower adopts a tapered form to ensure that the impact on significant views of St Paul’s Cathedral from Fleet Street and other key London views are respected and incorporates a richly articulated façade incorporating a diamond glazing pattern. The building places sustainability to the fore and targets BREEAM Excellent alongside other carbon and energy saving strategies. Leadenhall Street’s buildings are predominantly stone and the building embraces this with limestone elevations at its base. At ground floor, a number of new retail spaces are provided and new pedestrian routes linking Leadenhall Street to St Mary Axe and Bury Street. The proposals incorporate three new distinct public spaces, an open courtyard at the south entrance, new open space at the north entrance linking to the wider public realm network and reinstates the churchyard to the east of the adjoining Grade I listed St Andrew Undershaft, providing an additional 10,000 sf of public open space. In addition to the new public routes through the site, a double-height through-lobby is provided, allowing access from both north and south approaches. A separate entry provides direct access to a freely accessible viewing gallery that offers 360° views at Level 55 and a dramatic three storey view to the south, east and west at Level 56. The building will contribute to the continued development of the City as the world’s pre-eminent financial market and act as a catalyst for future growth. Commenting on the project Kent Jackson, Design Partner at SOM: “The City of London is a unique combination of heritage assets with some of the most internationally recognised buildings of the 21st Century. SOM is proud to be a part of this architectural legacy. Our approach is sympathetic to this rich historic context whilst designing a building that combines our architecture, sustainability and structural engineering sensibilities into a landmark design.” Nick Myall News editor

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Aiming for zero carbon in Calgary

Aiming for zero carbon in Calgary

The University of Calgary’s MacKimmie Complex designed by DIALOG is part of the Canada Green Building Council net-zero carbon building initiative to bring community wellbeing and climate change conversations to campus

Universities across Canada are eagerly anticipating the summer break. For the University of Calgary, this means work on the MacKimmie Complex and Professional Faculties Building Project designed by DIALOG can officially reach new heights. Designed to be a high-performance net-zero carbon building, the new complex comprises a fully renovated tower and block and a brand-new link that connects the two buildings by an atrium, all connected by a redesigned outdoor gathering space. The multi-year, multi-phase project will enhance pedagogical and administrative environments, accommodate growth, and strengthen the sense of place and community in the heart of the University of Calgary’s main campus. “This is one of the largest construction projects in recent campus history, so we are thrilled to be able to reveal to the campus community how the heart of main campus is being transformed with this project,” says Boris Dragicevic, associate vice-president, Facilities Development, University of Calgary. To bring the University of Calgary’s “Eyes High” strategic vision to life, design firm DIALOG has been selected for design architecture, mechanical engineering, and landscape architecture. The program for the MacKimmie tower and the new block and link includes large classroom spaces, generous open student study areas, and small group study spaces, to encourage easier movement and social interaction and collaboration within the space. “To accommodate an environment for education we asked ourselves how we can use design to participate in modern-day teaching and learning in a way that will go beyond technology and programming,” says Robert Claiborne, design architect and principal at DIALOG. “As one example of many, we are proposing a building skin that makes its energy-modelling systems tactile, or visible to the eye, as a way to make climate change conversations a permanent fixture in life on campus.” The MacKimmie Complex is one of the first-ever projects designed for certification with Canada Green Building Council’s new Zero Carbon Building Standard, Canada’s first green building program to make carbon emissions the key indicator for building performance. It is one of two projects by DIALOG, also signed into the AIA2030 Commitment, participating in the initiative. Tower construction began in March and continues through the summer until September 2019. Construction on the new block and link will begin in fall 2019 and continue until summer 2022. Nick Myall News editor

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A new dawn for Spitalfields House

A new dawn for Spitalfields House

Spitalfields House is in a vibrant area of the City of London that is currently undergoing an exciting transformation

ODOS Architects and Groupwork + Amin Taha are set to  transform Spitalfields House in London. Seaforth Land, the London-focused commercial real estate investor and asset manager, has been granted planning permission by the City of London for the renovation of the building located at 110-114 Middlesex Street and 1-11 Widegate Street in London, E1. Working with ODOS Architects and Groupwork + Amin Taha, Seaforth Land will renovate and reposition the 47,555 sq ft building by improving the common areas, building services and the overall tenant experience in the property. Visitors and employees working in the building will benefit from new retail, receptions and café spaces at ground level. The office spaces and roof terraces will be renovated, and new basement bicycle storage and shower and locker facilities will be provided. The building exterior will also be refurbished. Spitalfields House was built in 1992 and provides five upper floors of office space along with a combination of retail and office space on the ground and lower-ground floors. The building is multi-let to eight different businesses. Spitalfields House is only 2 minutes’ walk to Liverpool Street Station and to Spitalfields Market and sits prominently at the entrance to the pedestrianized Widegate Street offering prominent exposure to Bishopsgate. Ed Sneddon, Head of Development, Seaforth Land, said: “Spitalfields House lies in an exciting area of the City that has undergone a vibrant transformation in recent years. We saw an opportunity to remodel and reposition the asset to appeal to the diverse range of creative businesses that are increasingly vying for space in this area. We can now move forward with our plans for this prominently located asset and work will start shortly. We are progressing rapidly with plans for all our assets with further milestones to come over the summer.” David O'Shea, Founder & Creative Director of ODOS Architects, said: "New reception areas have been designed to become welcoming spaces, not just to pass through, but to dwell, with seating areas and cafes. The material palate for these spaces has been carefully composed including patinated brass window frames, charred timber wall linings and newly exposed concrete soffits.”   Seaforth Land acquired Spitalfields House in 2017.   Nick Myall News editor

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Bohlin Cywinski Jackson launch Pittsburgh plans

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson launch Pittsburgh plans

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson (BCJ) has unveiled designs for two new buildings at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in  Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Both projects, ANSYS Hall and TCS Hall, are designed for collaborative research and maker-based learning. The buildings will be utilized by faculty, graduate and undergraduate students across multiple disciplines, and underscore university-corporate partnerships. ANSYS Hall is designed to be a 36,000-square-foot, four-story facility for CMU’s College of Engineering. Funded by a gift from engineering simulation software company ANSYS, the project creates a hub for student making and features an indoor-outdoor maker-court for conceptualization and manufacturing of large-scale, functional prototypes. The building will also house the ANSYS Simulation Lab and research space, allowing ANSYS to serve as a direct resource to students and contribute to the cross-pollination of ideas. The project is scheduled for completion in the summer of 2020. Funded in part by a gift from Tata Consultancy Services, a global IT and business solutions company, TCS Hall will serve as a gateway  for those entering the CMU campus from Forbes Avenue. The 90,000-square-foot building will create a new ‘Student Collaboration Porch’ and house laboratories for computer science and mechanical engineering, a drone high-bay, flexible makerspace, an outdoor robot yard, and offices for CMU faculty and the TCS Collaboration Center. Scheduled for completion in spring of 2020, TCS Hall will serve as a keystone for development in the north of Forbes district. Both projects are led by Design Principal Gregory Mottola, FAIA, and Principal in Charge Kent Suhrbier, AIA. Mottola and Suhrbier are alumni of CMU’s School of Architecture and have contributed to many BCJprojects, both nationally and in Pittsburgh. “Collaboration and making are essential to what we do as architects, so we’re always interested in designing buildings that allow for this type of creative exploration and prototyping,” said Mottola. “We look forward to seeing the students at work in these spaces, and the results of their design thinking.” The two buildings add to the firm’s growing list of works for CMU, which includes Stever House, the nation’s first LEED-certified residence hall; the award-winning Software Engineering Institute; and the celebrated Robert L. Preger Intelligent Workplace, known as a ‘living laboratory’ for the study of workplace technology, which opened in 1994 and remains an international center for the advancement of sustainable building technologies today. Other notable BCJ projects throughout the Pittsburgh region include the Heinz History Center, Braskem (formerly Aristech) Headquarters, both High Meadow and the Barn at Fallingwater, and the recently Living Building-certified Frick Environmental Center. “We’re excited to build upon our firm’s legacy with CMU and the region,” said Suhrbier. “Especially during this exciting time in Pittsburgh, as the city reinvents itself as a leader in technology and maker-based industry.” Nick Myall News editor

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Bupa Place shines at MediaCityUK

Bupa Place shines at MediaCityUK

The cutting-edge Bupa Place office building designed by Chapman Taylor at MediaCityUK completes

Construction work on Bupa Place in Manchester in the UK has completed. The new BREEAM Excellent Regional Operations Building for Bupa has been handed over to Bupa, with colleagues starting to move into the new space. The Chapman Taylor-designed building houses CAT B interior fit-out by ID:SR Sheppard Robson, delivered by a team which also included Morgan Sindall, Turner & Townsend and Colliers. Occupying a prominent waterside location adjacent to the award-winning MediaCityUK, the building is the largest single-occupancy building in Manchester, providing over 13,700m2 NIA of BCO Grade A office space over six floors. The new development brings together over 2,000 employees from three buildings in their first co-located environment. Chapman Taylor was commissioned by Peel Land & Property to design a bespoke office building for Bupa. Sustainability and wellbeing were at the core of the brief for Chapman Taylor’s building design and ID:SR’s CAT B fit-out, with fully glazed façades and a large central atrium and glazed rooflight above that creates light, open internal spaces and a vibrant working environment within. The central atrium, which is surrounded with collaboration and informal social space on each level, creates a connection between floors and is centred with a feature 5m-high Barringtonia tree. The building façade is designed to curve away from the waterfront, creating space for the high-quality external landscaping and waterside terraced areas and maximising views across the water. The design incorporates solar shading to the southern façades, creating a striking feature for the building. Chapman Taylor’s CAT A internal finishes included the central core areas, the feature atrium and the open-plan floorplates. ID:SR Sheppard Robson worked closely with the Bupa team for the CAT B interiors to develop a bespoke, biophilic design to help promote mental wellbeing – a palette of sustainable organic materials and recycled content has been employed throughout, helping to create a relaxing work environment. The ground floor provides flexible break-out workspace for use by employees and visiting clients, as well as a highly visible reception area, a 250-cover restaurant offering fantastic views over the Manchester Ship Canal, a café and facilities for cyclists. Circulation stairs are finished to a high standard and located in a prominent position on the façade to encourage employees to be active. The layout of work and social spaces also facilitates movement through the building, creating increased interaction and collaboration. The range of agile work settings and social spaces gives employees control over where and how they work. The majority of workspace is located on the upper floors, where open-plan offices are flooded with natural light, and which offer stunning views across the waterside. Client meeting rooms are positioned centrally to give views over the busy workspaces. There is also a wellbeing suite located on the fourth floor, containing a faith room, occupational health and a first aid room. The project was delivered by Main Contractor, Morgan Sindall. The professional team included Turner & Townsend, which provided pre and post-contract cost management and Employer’s Agent services for both the CAT A and CAT B works, and Colliers International, which acted as Development Manager, overseeing the various teams involved in the project on behalf of Bupa. Nick Myall News editor

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